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2021-07-28 PC Agenda PacketAGENDA PLANNING COMMISSION Meeting to be Held Virtually Attend Virtually Here: https://www.cityofpa.us/984/Live-Virtual-Meetings July 28, 2021 6:00 p.m. I.CALL TO ORDER II.ROLL CALL III.PUBLIC COMMENT IV.APPROVAL OF MINUTES Minutes of July 14, 2021 V.ACTION/DISCUSSION/WORK SESSION 1.Work Session: Climate Resiliency Plan, Draft Public Outreach and Participation Plan Review and discuss proposed Public Outreach and Participation Plan and provide feedback. 2. Work Session: Climate Resiliency Plan Task 4 Preparation Discussion of SWOT analysis synthesis. VI.STAFF UPDATES VII.REPORTS OF COMMISSION MEMBERS VIII.ADJOURNMENT MINUTES PLANNING COMMISSION Held Virtually July 14, 2021 6:00 p.m. REGULAR MEETING PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE Chair Schwab opened the regular meeting at 6:15 p.m. ROLL CALL Commissioners Present: Andrew Schwab (Chair), Richie Ahuja, Steve Luxton, Steven Switzer City Staff Present: Emma Bolin (Manager) Ben Braudrick (Associate Planner) Chris Cowgill (Assistant City Attorney) Public Present: Bob Vreeland PUBLIC COMMENT: Bob Vreeland, City Resident Commented that he was under the impression that the Council had already accepted the Public Outreach and Participation Plan for the Climate Resiliency planning effort. Chair Schwab closed public comments APPROVAL OF MINUTES: Commissioner Switzer moved to accept the minutes from the June 23rd, 2021 meeting. Commissioner Luxton seconded, all were in approval ACTION ITEMS 1. Work Session: Climate Resiliency Plan Task 4 Preparation Commissioner Switzer presented is SWOT analysis of the Industrial and Open Space sections of the Land Use Element in the Comprehensive Plan. Discussion followed. 2. Work Session: Climate Resiliency Plan Draft Public Outreach and Participation Plan The Commission came to consensus that they would table this item for the next meeting when more Commissioners were available to provide input. Commissioner Luxton asked if the Commission could add an item to the agenda or a future agenda related to lot width requirements. Staff responded that the major code update to the zoning, subdivision, building, and growth management titles would include this review and were scheduled for the Planning Commission’s August 25th meeting. The Chair agreed that it should be integrated into the agenda for the August 25th meeting. July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 1 Planning Commission Minutes July 28, 2021 Page 2 S TAFF UPDATES Manager Bolin updated the Commission on the recent City partial reopening and the new appointment system that the City is using to meeting with staff either in person or virtually. She mentioned the Code Update workshop that had occurred the night before and encouraged the Commissioners to take the survey related to the update. Council has proposed going to a hybrid meeting style by the end of August. She reminded the Commission that they would be following the Council’s lead and canceling the first meeting in August as a break. Planner Braudrick updated the Commission on the Chamber of Commerce led workshop on a 10-year plan for the downtown. It was attended by upwards of 60 people in the Vern Burton. They will hold another meeting focusing on the City’s major commercial corridors at the end of July. REPORTS OF COMMISSION MEMBERS None. ADJOURNMENT The meeting adjourned at 6:45 p.m. Ben Braudrick, Secretary Andrew Schwab, Chair PREPARED BY: Ben Braudrick, Secretary July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 2 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PARTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN JUNE 2021 CASCADIA CONSULTING GROUP, INC. July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 3 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 2 Table of Contents Table of Contents ____________________________________________________________________ 2 Public Outreach and Participation Plan ___________________________________________________ 3 Background ___________________________________________________________________________ 3 Project team ________________________________________________________________________ 4 Goals and Objectives ____________________________________________________________________ 5 Key Engagement Strategies _______________________________________________________________ 6 Roles ______________________________________________________________________________ 6 Approach Overview ___________________________________________________________________ 8 Detailed Methods ___________________________________________________________________ 10 Anticipated Concerns_________________________________________________________________ 15 Timeline and Budget ___________________________________________________________________ 17 Budget ____________________________________________________________________________ 17 Timeline ___________________________________________________________________________ 20 Appendix A. Key Messages to Support Engagement ________________________________________ 22 Appendix B. Community Demographics and Key Audiences __________________________________ 24 Port Angeles Community Context _________________________________________________________ 24 Language needs _____________________________________________________________________ 25 Health Disparities Map _______________________________________________________________ 26 Key Audiences ________________________________________________________________________ 26 July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 4 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 3 Public Outreach and Participation Plan BACKGROUND The City and community of Port Angeles is developing a Climate Resiliency Plan to inventory and reduce its community and municipal greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions while building resilience to climate change impacts and related stressors. The City wants to achieve carbon neutrality by 2030, which exceeds WA State GHG Emissions reduction goals, established in E2SHB 2311 and RCW 70A.45.020. The Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan will build on current and prior work and identify new opportunities for ambitious, feasible, and equitable climate action that reduces Port Angeles’ GHG emissions and builds readiness for climate impacts like sea level rise and increased flooding. This current and previous work includes, but is not limited to: •2019 Resiliency Plan: Recommendations Addressing Climate Change for City of Port Angeles •2015 Climate Change Preparedness Plan for the North Olympic Peninsula •Clallam Transit’s Comprehensive Operational Analysis •EPA Decision Integration for Strong Communities (DISC) Application •2019 Planning Report •Shoreline Master Plan •2009 Sustainable Design Assessment Team Report Economic Development Plan •Transportation Plan •Capital Facilities Plan •Hazard Mitigation Plan •Previous Engagement Work conducted by the Climate Action Planning Group •Other relevant standards, ordinances, & policies Public outreach and participation are essential to this process, and the City is committed to centering equity and respect for all community members. This will lead to a Climate Resiliency Plan that reflects the communities’ priorities and values, builds capacity and interest in sustainable behavioral change from residents, and increases the community buy-in that is important for successful long-term implementation of the Resiliency Plan. This Public Outreach and Participation Plan (Plan) has been developed to: •Create a strategic framework for an inclusive and robust public engagement process for the development of the Climate Resiliency Plan. •Delineate key roles for the City, the CAPG, and Cascadia Consulting Group (the consultant hired to support development of the Resiliency Plan) in the public engagement process. This includes a detailed workplan that operationalizes the roles described herein. •Provide clear and consistent key messaging about the Climate Resiliency Plan, with the understanding that additional messages may need to be developed as the process progresses. This Plan includes: •Outreach & participation goals, objectives, strategies and roles •Budget and timeline •Appendices with supporting details o A. Key messages to support engagement o B. Community demographics and key audiences July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 5 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 4 Project team Project Managers: Ben Braudrick (City of Port Angeles), P.J. Tillmann (Cascadia) City Staff: Emma Bolin Planning Committee: Ben Stanley, Richie Ahuja Community Volunteers: Climate Action Planning Group1 Cascadia Outreach Support: Andrea Martin, Mike Chang, Tristan Smit, Aaron Tam 1 Members of the Climate Action Planning Group (CAPG) are listed in Appendix B. July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 6 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 5 GOALS AND OBJECTIVES Vision: Develop and implement a people-centered Public Outreach and Participation Plan that foments sustainable behavioral change from residents, builds public support for climate resiliency actions, and ensures the long-term success of the Climate Resiliency Plan. Goal A Communicate and empower residents in the climate resiliency planning process by educating and energizing Port Angeles’ residents about climate change and the process. Objective 1: Equip residents with a baseline level of knowledge of climate resiliency and sustainability concepts and practices, including the urgency of the climate crisis, and convey how the climate resiliency planning process relates to and supports the interests and values of all audiences within the community. Objective 2: Educate residents, businesses, and leaders about the co-benefits of climate resiliency planning that leads to long-term behavioral and systemic change for community-wide resiliency for climate change. Objective 3: Increase understanding of the urgency of the climate crisis in a way that helps motivate and inspire sustainable and climate-smart behavior change for Port Angeles residents and households. Goal B Build and inspire communitywide support for the Climate Resiliency Plan through a transparent, inclusive, and accessible process that is responsive to community concerns. Objective 1: Reduce barriers to participation for all audiences, ensuring that the community knows when, how, and why they can participate in the Climate Resiliency Plan process. Objective 2: Center the perspectives, needs, and priorities of the Port Angeles community—with a focus on frontline communities such as non-English speaking households, elders, youth, and people of color—by using relevant, in-language methods for different audiences across ages, industries, cultures, and locations. Objective 3: Have an open and public process that builds trust between the City and its communities by providing multiple engagement opportunities and ensuring transparency in how community input shapes the final Climate Resiliency Plan. Objective 4: Integrate community feedback at multiple touchpoints and ensure that the Climate Resiliency Plan is reflective of the communities’ priorities, values, and goals. Goal C Support the cohesive and self-sustaining CAPG ready to move forward with plan objectives and future planning efforts. Objective 1: Work collaboratively with the CAPG to further define clear roles, responsibilities, and decision-making processes for Resiliency Plan implementation. Objective 2: Provide resources to support the CAPG as ambassadors for community resiliency to climate change. Objective 3: Ensure that the CAPG is equipped with tools and methods for long-term community engagement and implementation after the conclusion of the planning process that is likely to be successful and consistent with other initiatives. July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 7 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 6 KEY ENGAGEMENT STRATEGIES Successful engagement requires tailored approaches to meet the assorted needs and priorities of key audiences and partners. We acknowledge that individuals and organizations within the key audience groups will vary in their understanding of climate change and climate impacts and their level of support for climate action. To that end, we will use several core engagement strategies to connect with audiences around their priorities and concerns—meeting audiences where they are at. Our approach is designed to engage a representation of the public across these spectra by reaching out to the following groups who are critical to implementing Climate Resiliency Plan strategies, will be most affected by Climate Resiliency Plan actions, and/or are typically harder-to-reach populations. This engagement plan will be implemented by the following groups: •Port Angeles City Staff (City). The City will be in charge of leading public engagement at pop-up events and through social media and online presence. They will also be leading engagement with City boards, commissions, and City Council. •Climate Action Planning Group (CAPG). The CAPG will be leading public engagement at pop-up events and at three (3) community meetings, where they can broadly engage with community members and key stakeholder groups. These meetings are in addition to the meetings and workshops that Cascadia will be leading. CAPG members will also lead disseminating information online (e.g., via social media, email, etc.), act as a key advisor in strategy and action development, and act as an accountability mechanism for the City and Cascadia. •Cascadia Consulting Group (Cascadia). Cascadia will be leading the development of communications collateral, two (2) public workshops, one (1) public survey, and support facilitation of the CAPG. Cascadia will also support the CAPG and City with their public and stakeholder engagement events, as needed and budget allows. Roles Engagement Strategy Lead Support Communications collateral Cascadia, CAPG, City Cascadia, as needed Two (2) public workshop Cascadia City, CAPG One (1) public survey Cascadia CAPG Three (3) community meetings CAPG Cascadia Pop-up events City, CAPG — Engagement meetings with key implementation partners City CAPG, Cascadia Facilitation of the CAPG Cascadia — July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 8 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 7 Engagement Strategy Lead Support Briefings at public meetings and City boards/commissions City Cascadia City website updates, newsletters, social media, and other communication channels City, CAPG Cascadia July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 9 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 8 Approach Overview Below is our approach overview, which includes the roles in parentheses. Subsequent sections in this Plan will provide details on bolded strategies. See Appendix B for a detailed list of stakeholders. Goal A: Communicate and empower residents in climate resiliency planning process Goal B: Build and inspire communitywide support Goal C: Support the cohesive and self- sustaining community group Ongoing strategies Internal Stakeholders Decisionmakers – City Council City leaders whose decisions drive investment and policy ✓Council meetings (City)✓Email updates & one-on-one meetings, as needed (City) Implementation Leads – City Staff City staff who are responsible for directing Resiliency Plan implementation. ✓Meetings, emails, or briefings, as needed (City) Guides and Analysts City commission or committee members who inform policy ✓Planning Commission meetings, emails, or briefings as needed (City and CAPG) ✓Planning Commissioners participation on the CAPG (CAPG) External Stakeholders Advocates Supportive and willing to put in effort to support Resiliency Plan process ✓Communications collateral (Cascadia and CAPG) ✓Community meetings (CAPG) ✓Stakeholder and partner engagement meetings (City) ✓Two (2) public workshops (Cascadia) ✓Facilitation of the CAPG (Cascadia) ✓City webpage (City) ✓Email listserv (City) ✓Social media (City) ✓City newsletter (City) Critical Perspectives Groups frequently not reached but critical to equitable outcomes Implementation Partners Conduct operations that affect the success of Resiliency Plan implementation July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 10 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 9 Goal A: Communicate and empower residents in climate resiliency planning process Goal B: Build and inspire communitywide support Goal C: Support the cohesive and self- sustaining community group Ongoing strategies General Public Resiliency Plan strategies and implementation affect day-to-day lives ✓ Public survey (Cascadia) ✓ Pop-up events and community meetings (CAPG) July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 11 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 10 Detailed Methods In the following sections, we detail our key methods for the following engagement strategies: • Communications collateral • Public workshops • Public survey • Community meetings • Pop-up events • Stakeholder engagement meetings • Facilitation of the CAPG • Briefings at public meetings • City website updates, newsletters, social media, and other communication channels COMMUNICATIONS COLLATERAL In order to support the wide variety of engagement strategies and key audiences, Cascadia will develop six (6) different key communications and outreach collateral with project messaging, visually rich and catchy graphics and images, and recommendations to inspire individual and community-wide climate action. Key engagement materials could include: • Visually rich factsheets that could provide an overview of the Climate Resiliency process, GHG emissions, sustainability practices, the need for urgent action from individual community members, client resiliency, and key reduction opportunities, and how to get involved. • Postcards that can be handed out community events (i.e., farmers markets) that raise awareness about the Climate Resiliency Plan process, and drive participants to sign up for updates and workshops. • Messaging templates to be used for media, social media, and other communications by the City and CAPG. • Informational presentation to be used by outreach partners and volunteers at various community events. • Content for information displays at popular destinations. As budget allows and as necessary, outreach collateral can be translated into Spanish and additional materials can be developed. The following materials will be provided to anyone conducting outreach and all available online. In addition to the six communication materials that Cascadia will develop, the CAPG and the City will also lead development of their own outreach materials as needed and relevant (e.g., the City may want to have an article they want to draft for a local ad or newsletter; the CAPG may want to have tailored collateral for a K-12 audience). These efforts will be mutually exclusive. In these instances, Cascadia will help support them both in communications development. Key deliverables include: • Six (6) communication materials led by Cascadia. • Additional communication materials led by the City and the CAPG, with support from Cascadia, as needed. July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 12 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 11 VIRTUAL OR IN-PERSON PUBLIC WORKSHOPS Interactive workshops are productive ways to get specific and actionable feedback from key stakeholders, concerned residents, and other interested community members. For the Climate Resiliency Planning process, Cascadia will host and facilitate two public engagement workshops. These workshops will be held at key points of the Climate Resiliency Planning process, listed below. • Workshop #1 will focus on action development to be included in the Climate Resiliency Plan. • Workshop #2 will focus on reviewing the draft of the Climate Resiliency Plan. Each workshop will be 1.5-hours. Virtual or in-person workshops will be based on the City’s most recent COVID-19 protocols. Cascadia will work with the City and CAPG on promoting these workshops to the broader public, key organizations, community leaders, and community members—with an emphasis on recruiting historically underserved community groups—through a variety of channels, which could include: • Updates on the City website • Email listserv updates • Social media posts • City-wide newsletters • Posters at key community places—such as stores, community centers, schools, and libraries • Radio announcements Key deliverables for each workshop—which will be led by Cascadia—are anticipated to include: • Workshop agendas o Provide copy for upcoming events in the form of event descriptions for the project webpage, blog posts, social media posts, and newsletter content. • Workshop materials such as discussion guides, presentations, etc.2 o Provided translated materials, if necessary. • Brief summaries of each workshop, with a focus on key input to the Climate Resiliency Plan 2 For virtual workshops, physical materials can be mailed to community members or groups without reliant access to broadband, if requested. While we will adhere to COVID-19 protocols, we have outlined some of the pros and cons of virtual and in-person workshops. Pros Cons Virtual workshop • Can lower barriers of participation for individuals – especially those who have typically not engaged (e.g., working parents, non- English speakers). • Can facilitate more feedback via chat functions or other virtual facilitation platforms. • Can be recorded for future reference. • Technological barriers for people who don’t have computers, reliable internet bandwidth, or unfamiliar with virtual workshop technology platforms. • If participants have cameras off, it can be harder to connect with other workshop participants. • Potential for “Zoom bombing”. In-person workshop • Easier for people to access who don’t have technology access at home. • Can facilitate more group collaboration because of in-person nature of events. • Travel to a physical location can be a barrier of participation – especially those unable to drive or travel, working parents, or youth. • Typically more expensive, because of venue, printing, food, and travel costs. July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 13 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 12 PUBLIC SURVEYS Public surveys can be used to gather feedback from the broader community. It allows for the flexibility for community members to provide feedback on their own timeline, which can be a benefit for those that might have conflicts with workshop dates or times. Cascadia will lead the development and analysis of one (1) public survey, hosted on a survey platform such as SurveyMonkey, focusing on gathering feedback and review of the draft Climate Resiliency Plan. However, because there is only one survey, Cascadia can repurpose the survey objective if needed. The City and the CAPG will provide revisions to the survey and help support distributing surveys via the following methods: • Updates on the City website • Email listserv updates • Social media posts • City-wide newsletters • Posters at key community places—such as stores, community centers, schools, and libraries • Radio announcements The public survey will be open for approximately one (1) month. Key deliverables will include: • One 15 to 20 question public survey • Distribution of survey via communication channels • 3-5 page memo detailing public survey results COMMUNITY MEETINGS Having community-run meetings can be a powerful to engage the broader community by meeting them where they are at—such as schools, community centers, or businesses. The CAPG, with support from Cascadia, will lead up to three (3) community meetings. The CAPG will focus on facilitating these meetings, with meeting objectives to be determined between CAPG and Cascadia. Likely objectives include: • Educating the community on climate change impacts, climate adaptation, climate mitigation, and the urgency of the climate crisis • Informing the community on the Climate Resiliency Plan • Informing the community about additional engagement opportunities • Gathering feedback from the community about what they want to see in the Climate Resiliency Plan, especially on individual actions—or actions that community members are willing to do (e.g., transition to electric vehicles, install energy efficient appliances) • Educating the community on what they can do to reduce their GHG footprint and help progress climate action Considerations to run successful meetings include but are not limited to: • Recruit local experts, such as Ian Miller from Washington Sea Grant, to present at these meetings. • Determine clear roles, responsibilities, and timing for those who are planning and staff meetings. This includes identifying facilitators, notetakers, marketing and event promotion, people to staff welcome tables, and any other meeting roles. To support note-taking, which can July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 14 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 13 help ensure transparency in the Climate Resilieny Plan’s process and ensure that the community sees their feedback integrated into the final Climate Resiliency Plan. Cascadia will develop a meeting summary template. •Provide CAPG members with resources to discuss climate change with community members. In particular, resources for those who may be opposed to climate action will be helpful. Additional information is provided below. •Set expectations for participants, which includes setting community guidelines and agreements to create a welcoming and inclusive space for all. Additionally, Cascadia can help support the CAPG in providing mechanisms to address community participants that may be opposed to climate action. While there are multiple resources to leverage (see: Climate Reality Project’s “Starting the Conversation – Five Tips on How to Talk to Climate Deniers in Your Family”; Yale Climate Communication’s “An expert’s advice on talking to the climate skeptic in your life”; California Governor’s Office of Planning and Research’s “Who are the Deniers?”; and the New York Times’ “So You Want to Convince a Climate Change Skeptic: Here are some strategies for a hard conversation”.), some potential ways to respond to climate action opponents include: •Center values, not facts. Many climate skeptics may dispute the credibility of scientific facts. Research has shown that arguing on the credibility of climate science can alienate climate skeptics even further. Focusing on values—such as economic resilience, patriotism, religion & faith, defending the purity of nature, or community well-being—can be effective ways to find common ground.3 o However, come prepared with some evidence, but know when to back off. Most people are open to hearing contrasting opinions. If someone is skeptical of climate change, ask them: 1) what might convince you to believe in climate change or the need for climate action?; 2) Where are the areas you feel uncertain or skeptical about? While some people are hardline climate deniers, they are a small percentage of people in the U.S. (approximately 13%). •Listen and ask questions. Like stated before, many people are climate skeptics because of values. Active listening and asking open questions, especially without prejudice, can make people feel like they are being heard. Asking questions invites people to ask themselves how they came to believe what they do and why they still do, while keeping the door open for changing their own mind themselves. o If people are being disruptive during a public community meeting, listening to them, asking questions, and acknowledging you are recording their comments is a powerful tool to de-escalate disruption. Oftentimes, people just want to be heard. As a meeting host, you can make sure that their opinion matters—even if it is counter to the group majority. •Share personal stories. People may not believe the credibility of climate science, but if you are a trusted person, sharing your stories can make the issue of climate change real and tangible for them. •Be flexible and acknowledge the work will continue to happen. For some people, being skeptical of climate change has been a learned opinion. A single conversation often will not be 3 Wolsko et al. (2016). Red, White, and Blue Enough to be Green: Effects of Moral Framing on Climate Change Attitudes and Conservation Behaviors. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. DOI: 10.1016/j.jesp.2016.02.005. July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 15 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 14 sufficient to change someone’s mind, but continuous empathetic conversations can gradually bring them into the conversation for urgent climate action. Cascadia will support the CAPG in developing meeting materials. This can include: • Meeting agendas • PowerPoint presentations • Handouts • Meeting summary templates POP-UP EVENTS Pop-up events at community events can be an ad-hoc way to promote upcoming engagement events and increase public awareness of the Climate Resiliency Plan to a broad range of community members. Typically, pop-up events can happen at farmers markets, open houses, festivals, or fairs. The CAPG and the City will lead pop-up events. Communication collateral, which will be developed by Cascadia, should be used at these pop-up events. ENGAGEMENT MEETINGS WITH KEY IMPLEMENTATION PARTNERS Engaging key implementation partners will be important to do, especially as we develop strategies, actions, and implementation plans for the Climate Resiliency Plan. There will likely be a set of actions that will require partnerships between the City and these other external groups. The City will lead all meetings with key implementation partners, including: • Port of Port Angeles • National Park Service, including Olympic National Park and Olympic National Forest • U.S. Coast Guard • Clallam County • Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce • Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe Cascadia and the CAPG will support the City in identifying meeting objectives, desired meeting outcomes, and attend on as-needed basis. FACILITATE THE CLIMATE ACTION PLANNING GROUP (CAPG) The City of Port Angeles already has an active community volunteer group—the CAPG—that has developed a list of climate action strategies, engaged with the broader Port Angeles community pre-COVID, and continued to stay politically involved in the process to develop the Climate Resiliency Plan. Cascadia will support the CAPG by attending and facilitating up to three (3) meetings, in addition to the kick-off meeting. These meetings include: • A Meet and Greet between Cascadia and the CAPG and identify goals for the Climate Resiliency Plan and the engagement approach. • A meeting to: o Foundation setting: Share initial results of the GHG analysis, approve the engagement plan, and develop vision, goals and priorities. July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 16 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 15 o Initial action development: Identify and narrow potential actions from an initial list Cascadia prepares based on the 2019 action list developed by the CAPG. Use this meeting to identify and refine initial actions and prioritize action evaluation criteria. o Draft plan review: Evaluate and vet the draft priority list of actions for the draft Climate Resiliency Plan. o Finalize plan: Confirm the feedback received and approve the final plan prior for public release. In addition to these meetings, Cascadia will communicate updates on the Climate Resiliency Plan’s progress to the CAPG. Key deliverables—led by Cascadia—include: • Meeting agendas • Meeting summaries BRIEFINGS AT PUBLIC MEETINGS The City will lead meetings with key City staff and leaders, such as City Council and the Planning Commission. These meetings can: 1) ensure that key governmental partners are continuously informed about the Climate Resiliency Plan and its status and 2) ensure that the process is open, transparent, and compliant with the Open Public Meetings Act. Cascadia can help prepare or attend these meetings, as budget allows. Key deliverables—led by the City with support from Cascadia as capacity allows—include: • Development of presentations and other materials tailored to the public meetings. • Presentation of Climate Resiliency Plan updates at key milestones. CITY WEBSITE UPDATES, NEWSLETTERS, SOCIAL MEDIA, AND OTHER COMMUNICATION CHANNELS The City currently has a website for the Climate Resiliency Plan (https://www.cityofpa.us/1010/Climate- Resiliency-Plan). The City will lead all updates to the website. Additionally, the City will lead social media and newsletter coordination. The City will lead the development of any communication collateral not already developed by Cascadia. While not expected, the CAPG can also lead the development of social media posts to promote engagement events and opportunities, write articles about the Climate Resiliency Plan, and conduct additional communications (e.g., radio interviews) that they are comfortable with. Anticipated Concerns Understanding guiding principles and potential concerns can inform our engagement approach and how strategies can be successful in achieving our goals. Below, we outline our anticipated concerns for community engagement and ways we will address these concerns. The list of options to address concerns is not exhaustive and is intended to be a starting point for conversations with CAPG and the City. July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 17 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 16 Anticipated Concerns Options and Approaches to Address Concerns • Unexpected challenges relating to data collection, which will affect the GHG Emissions Inventory timeline. • Cascadia will ensure an accurate and timely GHG emissions inventory by proactively communicating with key CAPG members and City staff to identify GHG inventory data and adhering to current best practices and best available science, as outlined by ICLEI GHG Inventorying protocol. Cascadia, City staff, and CAPG may discuss the use of default factors as indicated by the protocol, with the ability to update when information is available. In the original project timeline, there was a 3-month buffer that we can utilize if needed. Furthermore, Cascadia can work with CAPG and the City to condense other parts of the process to meet the final deadline for the Climate Resiliency Plan in summer 2022. • Distrust in government by the communities that we are trying to reach. • Cascadia will ensure that there will be detailed summaries and notes of each engagement event (e.g., workshops, meetings, surveys) to ensure transparency and build trust in the process. • Community support and capacity dependent on other top-level community priorities and concerns, such as COVID-19, equity, affordable housing, transportation, etc. • At every opportunity, the City, CAPG, and Cascadia will ensure that the Climate Resiliency Plan will integrate considerations of other topics. We will also take advantage of other ongoing public processes to cross-pollinate climate change with other topics. • Both staff and the public are overwhelmed by amount of time spent in virtual spaces. • The City, CAPG, and the Community will use a combination of engagement approaches – including in-person events and paper/online surveys – to reduce overwhelm of being in remote and virtual meetings. July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 18 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 17 Anticipated Concerns Options and Approaches to Address Concerns • Long term use and importance of the Plan – want to build a Plan that is relevant, real and evolves to meet the needs of the community as time progresses. • The City, CAPG, and Cascadia will build in a robust and actionable implementation plan, which can include key implementers, partners, estimated cost to implement, and timeline of implementation. • Community leaders are concerned about City staff capacity to fulfill their commitments. The CAPG will need to hold them accountable for this Climate Resiliency Plan. • In working collaboratively, the City, CAPG, and Cascadia can act as checks and balances on each other to ensure that each groups fulfills their role in this Public Outreach and Participation Plan. • There may be some hesitancy from some community members to not implement individual climate action. • In addition to building a transparent process, we will ensure that some of our engagement efforts—such as developing communication collateral, leading public workshops, or leading community meetings—will include opportunities for Port Angeles residents to take initiative and leadership on climate action. TIMELINE AND BUDGET Budget The table below describes how the community engagement budget will be spent and key assumptions about the responsibilities of City staff and the Cascadia team. Engagement Approach Frequency Consultant Budget or Level of Capacity Communications Collateral 6+ Cascadia will lead the development of 6 communication materials. The City and CAPG will develop any additional tailored materials, with Cascadia support, as needed. $4,410 Virtual or In-person Public Workshops 2 Cascadia will lead the development and facilitation of two (2) 1.5-hour workshops. This $17,369 July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 19 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 18 Engagement Approach Frequency Consultant Budget or Level of Capacity budget includes materials development, summary, consultant attendance, marketing and logistics Public Surveys 1 Cascadia will lead the development, analysis, and summary of one (1) 15-20 question public survey. $6,238 Community Meetings 3 The CAPG will lead up to three (3) community meetings with the support of Cascadia. Cascadia will support development of meeting agendas, presentations, and materials. The CAPG will host and facilitate these community meetings. CAPG capacity to host and facilitate meetings $1,200 Pop-up Events As many as capacity allows The City and CAPG will lead communication of the Climate Resiliency Plan at pop-up events, such as fairs or farmers markets. Will use the communications collateral developed by Cascadia. City staff and CAPG capacity to lead attendance at pop-up events Engagements Meetings with Key Implementation Partners Ongoing The City will lead all meetings with key implementation partners and stakeholders. Cascadia and CAPG will help support the City by identifying objectives, desired outcomes, and attend on an as-needed basis. City staff capacity to lead CAPG capacity $1,000 Facilitate the CAPG Up to 3 meetings Cascadia will lead and facilitate up to three (3) meetings with the CAPG. Cascadia will be in charge of meeting agendas and summaries. CAPG capacity to attend meetings $6,710 Briefings at Public Meetings Ongoing The City will lead the briefings at public meetings with key City staff and leaders (e.g., City Council and Planning Commission). Cascadia will support as budget allows. City staff capacity to lead Cascadia will support as budget allows July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 20 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 19 Engagement Approach Frequency Consultant Budget or Level of Capacity City Website Updates, Newsletters, Social Media, and Other Communication Ongoing The City will lead and coordinate communication updates via the website, newsletters, social media, and other communication channels. The CAPG will also help support communications development and dissemination as capacity allows. City staff capacity to lead CAPG to support as capacity allows Cascadia will support as budget allows Total $36,927 July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 21 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 20 Timeline Below is the public outreach and engagement timeline (see Task 2), framed within the overall project timeline. Project Timeline 2021 2022 With Tasks and Deliverables (✦) JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL Task 1. Kick-off Meeting & Project Management Kick-off meeting, project work plan + schedule ✦ Task 2. Public Outreach & Participation Plan Public Outreach & Participation Plan ✦ Communications Collateral ✦ Virtual or In-person Public Workshops (2) ✦ ✦ Public Surveys (1) ✦ Community Meetings (Up to 3) Pop-up Events (Ongoing) Engagement Meetings with Key Implementation Partners (Ongoing) Facilitate the CAPG (Kickoff Meeting + 3 additional meetings) a ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ City Website Updates, Newsletters, Social Media, and other Communication (Ongoing) a While there are 5 Cascadia-led CAPG meetings scheduled, there is budget for at least three (4) of these meetings. The kick-off Meet and Greet has already happened in March 2021. There is a possibility that our budget will accommodate a 5th meeting with the CAPG. July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 22 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 21 Project Timeline 2021 2022 With Tasks and Deliverables (✦) JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL Task 3. Community & Municipal Greenhouse Gas Inventory Data collection checklist ✦ GHG Report for Community & Municipal Inventories ✦ Staff trainings ✦ Task 4. Climate Resiliency Plan Draft for City Review ✦ Draft for Public Review ✦ Draft for incorporation into the Comprehensive Plan cycle ✦ Final Submission to the WSDOC ✦ July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 23 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 22 Appendix A. Key Messages to Support Engagement Why should I participate in this process? • The City of Port Angeles is building on prior work conducted by the Climate Action Planning Group (CAPG) and the North Olympic Resource Conservation and Development Council to integrate an ambitious Climate Resiliency Plan in its Comprehensive Plan update. Because of this, this is an important opportunity to shape the vision and direction of the City’s resiliency planning efforts and comes at a crucial juncture in our city’s and broader society’s history. Your input will influence the solutions selected to do our part in global climate action and also influence broader City decisions around housing, land use, transportation, parks and green space, and more. • This is an ongoing opportunity to tell us your priorities and concerns when it comes to resilient City and community practices and policies enacted to help address climate change. By participating, you have an opportunity to help guide the development of the City’s climate resiliency strategies. • This is an opportunity to learn what you can do to help create a vibrant and sustainable Port Angeles for years to come. • The City Port Angeles’ Climate Resiliency Plan is not just a guidance document, it will be integrated into the City’s Comprehensive Plan to support the City and community in creating climate solutions through public investments, individual actions for change, and sustainable business strategies and opportunities . • We are also in a time where we are addressing multiple global issues such as climate change, racial justice, and COVID-19 recovery. Given the City’s limited resources and many competing demands, your input helps us be as responsive as possible to the community ’s shared priorities and needs, and to generate win-win strategies. A Climate Resiliency Plan can help bring about community benefits in the form of financial benefits through reduced utility costs and business incentives, improved health, housing security and anti-displacement efforts, food security, and education. How will my feedback be used? • Public input will be an essential part of this resiliency planning process. All public input will be heard and considered along with input from City staff, City leaders, a volunteer community group (the CAPG), and other partners throughout the planning process. • All communications will be documented and shared out publicly. • The feedback received from our community engagement—in complement with prior work from the CAPG—will inform the vision, goals, strategies, actions, and implementation of Port Angeles’ Climate Resiliency Plan. Actions or issues that cannot be addressed through this planning process will be listed as suggested actions suitable or complementary to other projects , programs, or services as deemed appropriate. What is a climate resiliency plan? • Greenhouse gas emissions from transportation, energy use, land use change, and other sources are changing our climate in ways that already put the community at risk. Projected changes in temperature, July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 24 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 23 snowpack, severe storms, sea-level rise, and wildfire risk could threaten City infrastructure, natural resources, and public health. •A climate resiliency plan is a plan to reduce a City’s greenhouse gas emissions and prepare for the impacts of climate change that are unavoidable. By taking action to reduce the City’s emissions and prepare for climate risks, the City will position itself to be ahead of the curve and protect the health and well-being of our residents and economy. •In addition, this climate resiliency plan will help support and ensure the resiliency and self-sufficiency of Port Angeles’ residents in extreme circumstances and events—such as loss of transportation routes due to earthquakes or tsunamis—allowing the community to continue to respond and sustain itself. July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 25 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 24 Appendix B. Community Demographics and Key Audiences PORT ANGELES COMMUNITY CONTEXT The City of Port Angeles is vibrant and prospering, nurturing a balance of innovation and tradition to create an environmentally, economically, and fiscally sustainable community, accepting and cherishing its social diversity, small-town character and natural setting. Specifically, the goal is participation across diverse socio- economic, geographic, occupational, racial, and ethnic backgrounds to foster understanding of the climate resiliency planning process, education about sustainability practices, and inspire community buy-in. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the City of Port Angeles has an estimated population of approximately 19,832 persons in 2019. This demographic information can help inform public engagement, such as tailoring key messages, identifying priority audiences, and support an inclusive engagement process (e.g., translating materials to different languages). For example: • Since almost 20% of Port Angeles’ households do not have reliable internet access, ensuring that there are in-person opportunities to engage is important. • Additionally, knowing that about half of Port Angeles’ population owns their home, tailoring actions and strategies for homeowners may lead to higher impact. • Since almost three-quarters of the populations drives alone, tailoring actions that reduce single- occupancy vehicle trips can also lead to a higher impact. Other recent demographics are summarized as follows, based on the 2019 American Community Survey: Race White alone 86.9% American Indian and Alaska Native 2.8% Asian alone 2.5% Black or African American alone 1.5% Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander 0% Other race alone 1.1% Two or more races 5.2% Hispanic or Latino of any race 6.6% Age Under 5 years 6.4% 5-19 years 17.1% 20-44 years 32.2% 45-64 years 23.1% 65 and over 21.3% July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 26 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 25 Residents’ Place of Birth U.S. 96.3% Born outside the U.S.* 3.8% *Regardless of citizenship status Educational Attainment High school or equivalent 26.1% Some college, no degree 27.5% Associates degree 10.5% Bachelor’s degree 15.0% Graduate or professional degree 11.1% Languages English only 94.9% Language spoken at home other than English 5.1% •Spanish 2.2% •Other Indo-European languages 0.9% •Asian and Pacific Island languages 1.8% •Other languages 0.2% Housing Types Own 53.1% Rent 46.9% Computer and Internet Use Households with a computer4 86.6% Households with broadband internet connection5 81.7% Means of Transportation Drive alone 73.6% Carpool 11.9% Public Transportation 2% Walk 4.3% Bike 0.5% Mean travel time to work 19.8 minutes Language needs It is recommended that all project materials be translated into any languages spoken by more than 5% of a population. As Port Angeles’ population does not meet the 5% threshold for any language, we would 4 This statistic is not inclusive of smart phone ownership. 5 This is below the county average. In Clallam County, 87.3% of households have broadband internet connection. July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 27 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 26 recommend translations into Spanish or other Asian languages. Materials in other languages can be made available upon request. Health Disparities Map Below is a map from the Washington State Department of Health showing environmental health disparities based on the census tracts of Port Angeles. Environmental health disparities are measured by the cumulation of environmental exposures (diesel emissions, toxic releases from facilities, populations near heavy traffic roadways), environmental effects (lead risk from housing, proximity to hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facilities, wastewater discharge), socioeconomic factors (limited English proficiency, education, race and ethnicity, unaffordable housing, unemployment) and sensitive populations (death from cardiovascular disease, low birth weight). Darker blue colors indicate less pronounced health disparities. KEY AUDIENCES The following list includes key audiences to engage regarding the Climate Resiliency Plan’s development process. This is not an exhaustive list and will serve as a guide during outreach. The levels of engagement are a helpful tool to strategize who, how, and when partners can actively be brought into the climate resiliency planning process. It is easier to gear up for additional levels of engagement with stakeholders; scaling back in levels of engagement can reduce trust in the process and is not recommended. July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 28 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 27 LEVELS OF ENGAGEMENT 1 Inform 2 Consult 3 Involve 4 Collaborate Educate members of the group about the rationale for the project or decision; how it fits with City goals and policies; issues being considered, areas of choice or where input is needed. Gather information and ask for feedback from group to better inform the City’s work on the project. Work directly and consistently with group to ensure their concerns are understood and considered in the City’s planning process. Create a partnership to work along with groups and give them meaningful ownership developing and implementing the planning process or project. Example Activities • Social Media • Emails/Newsletters • Open houses • Presentations • Factsheets • Online surveys/polls • Public comment • Focus groups • Interactive workshops • Community forums • Resident advisory committees • MOUs with community- based organizations Internal Audiences Audience & Description Groups Engagement Goal Decision-makers City and County leaders who make decisions that drive investment and policy ▪ City Council ▪ Clallam County Consult and update for decision-making. Implementation Leads City staff who are responsible for directing resiliency plan implementation in departments ▪ Department heads and staff, specifically: o Planning o Community & Economic Development o Finance o Public Works o Legal o Fire Consult to gather feedback on potential strategies, align with priorities and processes, and garner support. Guides and Analysts City commission/committee members whose support and direction are important for community engagement, resiliency plan development, and implementation ▪ Planning Commission ▪ Climate Action Planning Group (CAPG) ▪ Washington State University Extension Involve, as appropriate, to gather feedback on engagement opportunities and CAP strategies. Members of the CAPG include: ▪ Aaron Lee ▪ Allyce Miller ▪ Ann Soule ▪ Barb Maynes ▪ Benji Astrachan ▪ David Large ▪ David Clark ▪ David Mattern ▪ Duane Morris ▪ Ed Chadd ▪ Jesse Waknitz ▪ Justin Plavet ▪ Justin Vendettuoli ▪ Karen Weaver ▪ Kenton Hotsko ▪ Mindy Gelder ▪ Nina Sarmiento ▪ Noah Glaude ▪ Pamela Hastings ▪ Pam Wilder July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 29 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 28 ▪ Bill Atkinson ▪ Bill Baccus ▪ Bob Vreeland ▪ Brian Phillips ▪ Bruce Pape ▪ Christeal Milburn ▪ Christy Cox ▪ Cindy J ▪ Elliot Bays ▪ Erin Shield ▪ Evelyn Simpson ▪ George Stratton ▪ Ian Miller ▪ Ian Nickel ▪ Janet Atkinson ▪ Janet Marx ▪ Kristina Holtrop ▪ Marilyn Eash ▪ Mark Ozias II ▪ Mel Messineo ▪ Melissa Williams ▪ Michael Clemens ▪ Miguel Reabold ▪ Mike Doherty ▪ Pat Milliren ▪ Pat Nachreiner ▪ Rich Meier ▪ Robert Knapp ▪ Ryan Qualls ▪ Sharah Truett ▪ Sissi Bruch ▪ Tera Dummitt External Audiences Audience & Description Groups Engagement Goal Advocates Very supportive of climate action and willing to put in effort to support the climate resiliency planning process. Environmental community-based organizations ▪ Olympic Discovery Trail ▪ North Olympic Development Council (NODC) ▪ North Olympic Peninsula Environment Group ▪ North Olympic Land Trust ▪ North Olympic Group – Sierra Club ▪ Clallam Conservation District Involve with to spread the word about the climate strategy; Involve in strategy development Community Groups and Critical Perspectives Community groups in Port Angeles that should be reached during public processes. Some of these groups have historically been hard to reach and are critical to equitable outcomes from climate strategy implementation Education ▪ Peninsula College ▪ Port Angeles School District ▪ Nature Bridge ▪ Tribal Schools ▪ Queen of Angels Catholic Schools ▪ Children’s Montessori School ▪ College Success Foundation Consult through tailored outreach to create accessible opportunities to participate in climate strategy planning process and build/strengthen relationships with community groups or individuals for long-term engagement around sustainability and climate issues Historically marginalized groups ▪ Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe ▪ The Answer for Youth ▪ Northwest Justice Project Port Angeles Office ▪ Center for Inclusive Entrepreneurship Faith-based communities ▪ First Baptist Church ▪ Calvary Chapel Port Angeles ▪ First Presbyterian Church of Port Angeles ▪ Independent Bible Church ▪ Lighthouse Christian Center ▪ St. Matthew Lutheran Church ▪ First United Methodist Church ▪ Port Angeles Seventh – day Adventist Church ▪ Clallam County Interfaith Earthcare Coalition ▪ St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church ▪ Holy Trinity Lutheran Church ▪ Queen of Angels Catholic Church July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 30 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 29 Audience & Description Groups Engagement Goal Housing ▪ Habitat for Humanity of Clallam County ▪ Serenity House of Clallam County ▪ Peninsula Housing Authority Other ▪ Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula ▪ Olympic Peninsula YMCA ▪ United Way of Clallam County ▪ Port Angeles Future Riders ▪ Interfaith Community Clallam County ▪ Clallam County Compassion Implementation Partners Conduct operations that affect the success of climate strategy implementation. Utilities ▪ Clallam County PUD Inform about overall process; consult with to gather feedback Transit Agencies ▪ Clallam Transit Contracted Services ▪ Waste Connections Inc. Other public entities ▪ Port of Port Angeles ▪ U.S. Coast Guard Other service providers ▪ Olympic Medical Center ▪ North Olympic Healthcare Network ▪ Peninsula Behavioral Health – Horizon Center ▪ Port Angeles Food Bank ▪ Healthy Families of Clallam County ▪ First Step Family Support Center ▪ Olympic Community Action Programs ▪ Sea Mar ▪ Catholic Community Services ▪ Soroptimist Club ▪ Rotary Club Business community ▪ Port Angeles Business Association ▪ Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce ▪ Economic Development Council (EDC) ▪ McKinley Papermill ▪ Olympic National Park Westport Yachts ▪ Port Angeles Downtown Association ▪ Port Angeles Small Business Development Center ▪ Port Angeles Association of Realtors Developers ▪ North Olympic Builders Association ▪ North Peninsula Building Association ▪ Washington Multifamily Housing Association July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 31 PUBLIC OUTREACH & PA RTICIPATION PLAN PORT ANGELES CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN | JUNE 2021 | 30 Audience & Description Groups Engagement Goal General Public Climate strategies and implementation affect day-to-day lives. ▪ Young families ▪ Various groups and communities, e.g., those representing major employers, schools, and social/gathering places Inform throughout the process and consult on strategies and the draft CAP report July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 32 Date: July 28, 2021 To: Planning Commission From: Ben Braudrick, Associate Planner Subject: Synthesis of Planning Commission Performed Climate Resiliency SWOT Analysis of the 2019 Comprehensive Plan Background: On November 17, 2020 City Council directed staff to enter into a contract with Cascadia Consulting with a Scope of Work including four tasks: Task 1 – Kick-Off Meeting & Project Management Task 2 – Public Outreach & Participation Plan Task 3 – Community & Municipal Greenhouse Gas Inventory Task 4 – Climate Resiliency Plan In preparation for the completion of the Task 4 - Climate Resiliency Plan objectives, City Staff has worked with Cascadia and the Port Angeles Planning Commission to evaluate the City’s most recent adopted Comprehensive Plan using a Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) Analysis. A SWOT analysis identifies internal and external factors that could influence a goal or project. It can be used in planning processes, as a risk assessment tool, or an evaluation method. Typically, the “SW” applies to internal or current strategies and policies whereas the “OT” applies to external or future potential. The four evaluative methods asked the following questions of Planning Commissioners: • Strengths Assets and Resources: Where are areas in the Comp Plan that highlight actions that can support Port Angeles' Climate Resiliency Plan? • Weaknesses, Limitations, Restrictions, and Challenges: What are the ways that climate change and resiliency are missing in the Comp Plan? • Opportunities: What are some opportunities to leverage and increase climate resiliency considerations in the Comp Plan? • Threats: What could negatively impact the ability to integrate and make climate-informed decisions in the Comp Plan? Using the above questions as a baseline, on February 10, 2021 the Planning Commission began their discussion of how to approach the SWOT analysis. Through consensus it was decided each Planning Commissioner would be assigned with 1-3 individual elements of the plan (splitting up the Land Use Element into its four distinct land use types) to evaluate. Commissioners would submit their SWOT to staff to be placed in the Planning Commission Packet and present their findings to the Planning Commission at the Public Meeting for feedback. The Plan Elements were split up and presented in the following way: July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 33 Element Reviewing Commissioner Date Presented Growth Management ................. Richie Ahuja 05/12/21 Land Use – Residential .............. Ben Stanley 04/28/21 Land Use – Commercial ............ Ben Stanley 04/28/21 Land Use – Industrial ................. Steve Luxton Steven Switzer 07/14/21 Land Use – Open Space ............. Steve Luxton Steven Switzer 07/14/21 Transportation ............................ Colin Young 04/14/21 Utilities and Public Services ...... Richie Ahuja 05/12/21 Housing ...................................... Marolee Smith 03/24/21 Conservation .............................. Ben Stanley 02/24/21 Capital Facilities ........................ Andrew Schwab 05/12/21 Economic Development ............. Andrew Schwab 05/12/21 Parks and Recreation .................. Colin Young 04/14/21 Overall Planning Commission SWOT Consensus: As Planning Commissioners presented each Element’s SWOT analysis thematic similarities emerged throughout the Comprehensive Plan. By highlighting these themes, a more strategic update and review of the Comprehensive Plan can be performed using the guidance of the Climate Resiliency Plan. The following themes are in no specific order: Strengths: • Concurrent Development Practices: Concurrent development protects loss of open space and the costs involved in constructing and maintaining City infrastructure. A reduction in the need to maintain “leapfrog” infrastructure (where new development is disjointed from the existing) allows more funding towards resiliency-centric upgrades to already existing facilities. • Walkability and Transportation Equity: The Plan promotes urban design and development encouraging walkability and equity in the community. The more diverse a transportation system is, the more resilient it is. Some features include grid patterned streets, neighborhood-centric development, and higher density. • Affordable Housing: Housing affordability and accessibility are essential to community resiliency. Many of the Plan’s elements focus on integrating housing equity through affordability and accessibility, but do not provide requirements to ensure its creation and maintenance. • Environmental Stewardship: The Plan places an emphasis throughout on the importance of environmental stewardship, but it may not provide enough standards or direction related to resiliency. • Infill Development: Infill development protects open space, allows for resiliency-centric upgrades to existing facilities, fills in critical gaps to facilities, and if done correctly, creates neighborhood vibrancy. • Preservation of Open Space: Open space is a critical element of climate resiliency. Due to the City’s location between the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the Olympic Mountain Range, open space is an endangered land use within the City. The Plan consistently supports its protection and integration into development. • Green Infrastructure: The plan actively promotes green infrastructure, which is essential to a modern resilient community. • July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 34 Weaknesses: •No Mention of Climate Resiliency: Many of the Plan’s Elements do not directly reference climate resiliency in either their goals or policies. Another method of climate resiliency recognition could be creation of a new “Climate Resiliency” Element in the Plan. •Vague Policies and Unclear Direction: Many of the policies throughout the Plan use active terminology such as “encourage”, “consider”, and “promote”. These terms do not provide minimum standards and bright lines related to resiliency. Using terminology such as “shall”, “require", “reduce”, and “do not” or “no” can enforce minimum development standards that support resiliency. Providing examples of specific aspects of a goal’s climate resiliency creates clearer direction. Specific examples can be drawn from existing situations in Port Angeles, the North Olympic Peninsula, or Washington State and beyond. These examples will direct proper climate resilient efforts. •No Connection or Only Indirect Reference to Municipal Code: Relating goals and policies back to the Port Angeles Municipal Code it directly influences or directs will strengthen a goal’s relationship to the enforcement of climate resiliency. •Confusing Language: For the Plan to be successful goals and policies must be succinct, approachable, and operational. Every goal and policy must direct action, and that action should relate in some way to furthering resiliency. •Does Not Discourage Bad Design: Although the Plan encourages proper resilient design, it does not actively discourage or prohibit design that threatens resiliency. •Does Not Recognize Risk: More emphasis must be made to demonstrate the consequence of our community failing to become more resilient. Opportunities •Prioritize Climate Resilience: The current vision for Port Angeles revolves around our community becoming more resilient. More can be done in each element to reinforce the importance of resiliency by realizing our 20-year vision. •Focus on Density and Mixed Uses: As Port Angeles continues to grow, more emphasis on density and the mixing of uses and facilities will help continue to build resiliency. •Mention Changes Already Made: Reevaluation must occur to celebrate what has already been done to achieve Port Angeles’ vision of resiliency. •Connecting Transportation to Land Use: Transportation and land use are strongly connected through a relationship of location and access. More can be done to reinforce their relationship and the importance of this relationship for climate resiliency. •Partnerships: As a community with limited resources, the creation and maintenance of partnerships with other public agencies, not-for-profits, and local organizations will build vision, strength, and greater resiliency. As an isolated area, the North Olympic Peninsula also needs to partner together to protect our environmental, economic, and recreational assets regionally. •Greater Land Use Specificity: More emphasis could be placed on certain aspects of the City’s land uses in order to better understand their relationship to building resiliency. •Raising Environmental Protection Standards: Although the plan mentions the importance of environmental protection, more can be done to actively enforce and require protection. •Upgrading Existing Facilities: Focus on upgrading our existing facilities to become more efficient and inclusive is the most effective path forward in Port Angeles’ climate resiliency efforts. July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 35 • Diversity: Diversity is resiliency. Each element requires a goal directing and supporting diversity and inclusion both culturally, and through land use and community development. • Direct Connection Linking Regulation to Planning: In an effort to educate the community about climate resiliency, direct connections could be made to local, county, and state regulations that enforce or reinforce its importance. Relationships can be drawn between those regulations and our Plan’s goals and policies. • Connecting Environmental Standards and Climate Resiliency: Continuing to connect the dots between our community’s relationship to environmental degradation and current efforts towards reconciliation and mitigation will help educate the community about the importance climate resiliency. Threats • Continued Single Occupancy Vehicle-Centric Development: Promoting transportation equity and diversity is not the same as discouraging or continuing harmful land use patterns that contribute to the proliferation and necessity of the single-occupancy-vehicle. More must be done to diminish the focus on single occupancy vehicles and the immense land use they require to operate. • Clarity: Without a more defined climate resiliency-related vision, goals, and objectives, the Plan will fail to achieve its efforts towards improvements and efficiencies. • Weak Direction: The plan must define an active strategic baseline for future community development. • Lack of Vision and Scenarios: The plan lacks the understanding that the future is full of uncertainty due to climate change. As climate change drives increasing event severity and outcome uncertainty, more must be done to prepare. Designing select scenarios will help community leaders better understand the mitigation efforts required to change critical decision paths moving forward. July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 36 Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis First Review: July 14th | 1 SWOT Analysis A SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities & Threats) analysis identifies internal and external factors that could influence a goal or project. It can be used in planning processes, as a risk assessment tool, or an evaluation method. Typically, the “SW” applies to internal or current strategies and policies whereas the “OT” applies to external or future potential. The following is an example SWOT analysis template for the Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan. •What could negatively impact the ability to integrate and make climate-informed decisions in the Comp Plan? •What are some opportunities to leverage and increase climate resiliency considerations in the Comp Plan? •What are the ways that climate change and resiliency are missing the Comp Plan? •Where are areas in the Comp Plan that highlight actions that can support Port Angeles' Climate Resiliency Plan? Strengths, Assets & Resources Weaknesses, Limitations, Restrictions & Challenges ThreatsOpportunities July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 37 Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis First Review: July 14th | 2 SWOT Analysis A SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities & Threats) analysis identifies internal and external factors that could influence a goal or project. It can be used in planning processes, as a risk assessment tool, or an evaluation method. Typically, the “SW” applies to internal or current strategies and policies whereas the “OT” applies to external or future potential. The following is an example SWOT analysis template for the Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan. •What could negatively impact the ability to integrate and make climate-informed decisions in the Comp Plan? •What are some opportunities to leverage and increase climate resiliency considerations in the Comp Plan? •What are the ways that climate change and resiliency are missing the Comp Plan? •Where are areas in the Comp Plan that highlight actions that can support Port Angeles' Climate Resiliency Plan? Strengths, Assets & Resources Weaknesses, Limitations, Restrictions & Challenges ThreatsOpportunities July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 38 Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis First Review: July 14th | 3 Growth Management Chapter Key Objectives: Evaluate the Conservation chapter on how well it integrates climate change and resiliency. Identify additional opportunities and risks of integrating climate change in future iterations of the Growth Management chapter. Strengths Weaknesses • Open language from GMA that can be interpreted to support integration of climate and DEIJ into planning activities (P-2A- 01) • sets minimum standards for services (eg energy, transport, waste management, storm water management, etc (P-2A. 09 – 11) and for provision of community facilities • Requires demonstration of financial capability for continuous operations for any new facility • Seeks to integrate and maintain consistency of services between City, PAUGA, County. • limits annexation of land outside the PAUGA, and constrains land use within PAUGA (P-2B.01-03) • Requires that standards be maintained for for services such as waste, storm water management, energy delivery, etc in case there is additional land annexed from within the PAUGA boundary • Chapter does not explicitly take cognizance of climate resilience and climate risks. This can have repercussions on how the guidance in the plan is written and interpreted by the various stakeholders that rely on the document. Opportunities Threats • Add explicit language prioritizing climate resilience and management of climate risks while meeting the state compliance requirements under GMA. This could be added as Goal 2B. • Absence of specific guidance around climate risk and resilience could lead to continuation of business as usual and promulgation of new policies and investments detrimental to long term social, economic, and environmental stability of the city and the region. July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 39 Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis First Review: July 14th | 4 Land Use - Residential Chapter Key Objectives: Evaluate the Conservation chapter on how well it integrates climate change and resiliency. Identify additional opportunities and risks of integrating climate change in future iterations of the - Land Use - Residential - chapter. Strengths Weaknesses • Low impact development cited as framework for all land use (P- 3A.02) • P-3B.05 – Encouragement of grid-planned urban design is congruent with resilience efforts promoting walkable, diverse urban environments • P-3B.06 – Encouragement of site specific design is congruent with climate change resiliency and could be expanded upon • Goal 3C, emphasizing neighborhood-centric development, is congruent with sustainable urban development best practices • P-3C.05 – Encouragement of high density affordable housing in CBD is fully in line with sustainable development • Goal 3B needs to define “environment” more explicitly to reference climate change and sustainability (and needs to insert comma after environment) • P-3B.01 – reference to “urban services” in land use element is not relevant; reference to Capital Facilities element is unnecessary • P-3B.02 – reference to “reasonable shape” of single family lots is vague. Emphasis on shape of lots is restrictive of alternative residential uses and the flexibility required to address sustainable housing. Plan should explicitly allow irregular shaped and smaller lot development • P-3B.03 – Confusing language – should be edited down to reflect general acceptance and promotion of higher densities • P-3B.04 – The goal of promoting fire safety needs to be balanced with goals of promoting walkable urban environments. Compromise is necessary between suburban width roads previously seen as best practices for fire safety and with urban design goals promoting density (which aids climate change efforts by concentrating building in middle of existing urban area) • P-3B.05 – Cul-de-sacs and other auto-centric urban street designs should be actively discouraged, not supported conditionally • P-3C.02 – Specific focus on street sizes and auto access to higher density housing, under notion of traffic management, should be eliminated and replaced with understanding that higher density housing does not need to be paired with auto infrastructure. Apartment housing should be equally or predominantly paired with pedestrian infrastructure. Also the connection between larger streets and less traffic has been proven false (induced travel demand from larger streets has been proven true). Any July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 40 Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis First Review: July 14th | 5 auto-dominant infrastructure paired with housing requirements should specify bare minimum standards (simple auto access, no parking or street width requirements) Opportunities Threats • P-3C.04 – Pairing manufactured home and other home construction standards with zoning regulations – this can be rephrased and reworked to allow tremendous flexibility in higher density residential construction in the city rather than used as a restriction • There is a larger opportunity in this section to completely disconnect desired housing types and densities from automobile and street considerations and replace them with a connection between housing and pedestrian/bike/transit connections • There is an opportunity to build much deeper housing flexibility into this section, in conjunction with zoning code changes. For example, explicit allowance of micro lot platting and development; allowance of incremental housing and modular housing; etc. • The city’s full approval of duplex development without conditional review should be inserted into this section to show the larger priority behind that code change • There is an opportunity to insert language encouraging the City to take steps to encourage higher density housing development (such as purchasing and assembling vacant lots for development; creating a fund for subsidizing new housing construction; etc.) • There is an opportunity to explicitly support “green” housing development features such as renewable energy, energy efficiency, onsite water and food production, etc. • There is the threat of continued automobile dominant housing and neighborhoods due to the embedded language throughout this section. • There is a threat that this chapter will be incongruent or not matched sufficiently with the building and zoning codes that determine possible densities and green building improvements July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 41 Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis First Review: July 14th | 6 Land Use - Commercial- Chapter Key Objectives: Evaluate the Conservation chapter on how well it integrates climate change and resiliency. Identify additional opportunities and risks of integrating climate change in future iterations of the - Land Use - Commercial- chapter. Strengths Weaknesses • G-3E – Goal specifically mentions environmental goals alongside safety and compatibility when discussing commercial shopping • Goal 3F, emphasizing traditional downtown environment, is congruent with sustainable urban development – and could be expanded with specifics • P-3E.02 – Notion of separating pedestrian, bike, and vehicle traffic needs to be clarified to avoid the 20th century focus on separation of uses. Mixed use environments should be encouraged and pedestrian/bike areas need to be considered equal to traffic concerns • P-3E.03 – Pairing of shopping center location and traffic concerns should be eliminated. Traffic and roads do not need to be cited alongside commercial districts, especially because the possible locations of commercial development are already specified by the land use map Opportunities Threats • Emphasis on environmental goals alongside public safety and land use planning when discussing commercial shopping could be greatly clarified and expanded to reflect explicit climate change resiliency goals • Explicit mention of bicycle infrastructure, such as bike racks, could be paired with commercial development to improve multi- modal access • Much more specific mention of how higher density, diverse, multi-modal urban commercial environments are directly related to climate change resiliency (decreased transport/building emissions, decreased development of undeveloped natural areas, increased social cohesion and efficiencies) could be inserted • The main threat is that commercial land use regulations will continue to follow the suburban-inspired status quo from the 20th century July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 42 Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan SWOT Analysis | Combined Chapters 4/7/2021 | 7 Land Use - Industrial- Chapter Key Objectives: Evaluate the Conservation chapter on how well it integrates climate change and resiliency. Identify additional opportunities and risks of integrating climate change in future iterations of the - Land Use - Industrial- chapter. Strengths Weaknesses •Goal G-3H prioritizes the minimal impacts on the natural environment and effective use of the community’s natural resources •P-3H.03 mitigates nuisances and hazardous characteristics such as noise, air, water, odor, pollution •P-3H.04 does not permit petroleum, liquefied natural gas, and non-clean energy facilities outside heavy industrial use area •P-3H.07 considers the climate change impacts of new industrial activity or expansion before any approval •G-3I facilitates reuse of large vacant or isolated industrial areas no longer in operation •G-3H vague at defining “minimal impact on the natural environment” -no mention of impervious surfaces, waste collection, effects of increased energy use etc. •G-3I lacks additional policies on assessing levels of contamination and no standards on evaluating cleanup options on sites •G-3I no implementation plan/guidelines for ensuring successful reuse of vacant sites. •Overall no delineation between Industrial Land Usages Opportunities Threats •Collaborate with Washington State’s Department of Ecology’s Voluntary Cleanup Program (VCP) to facilitate industrial site cleanups •Define subgroups of Industrial uses (Industrial-Light, Industrial- Heavy, and Industrial-Transit) •Prioritize the public availability of environmental impacts of local industries •Industrial development can impede/promote community’s future fiscal viability and job growth •Anthropogenic land use presents rivalling challenges to biodiversity than climate change alone •Market realities threaten the availability of usable industrial land July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 43 Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan SWOT Analysis | Combined Chapters 4/7/2021 | 8 Land Use – Open Space- Chapter Key Objectives: Evaluate the Conservation chapter on how well it integrates climate change and resiliency. Identify additional opportunities and risks of integrating climate change in future iterations of the - Land Use – Open Space - chapter. Strengths Weaknesses • G-3J retains natural landscapes, preserves fish and wildlife habitats, and provides natural corridors connecting wildlife habitats • P-3J.01 Preserve unique or major physical features such as marine shorelines, bluffs, ravines, streams, wetlands, wildlife habitat and other environmentally sensitive areas • P-3J.02 Promotes the preservation of wildlife habitat • P-3J.03 Regulates access to natural areas open spaces so as to avoid degrading areas • G-3K no clear guidelines for successful open space development/ usage (e.g., only using indigenous plants/restricting invasive plant use in landscaping) • G-3J Without clear direction creating open space in the urban landscape can promote more non-places across the city hindering public use and health under the guise of a green landscape Opportunities Threats • Implement stormwater gardens in place of existing water management so water can be filtered naturally back into the ground • Activating and beautifying underutilized alleys (particularly downtown) to increase usable public space • Support/ Promote urban orchards in conjunction P-3J.04 to allow public access to fresh fruits and promote stewardship • Extend free wifi to applicable open spaces/ city parks as an incentive to promote the value and prevent the underutilization of urban nature areas • Resource protection, damage to sensitive areas are constant threats to the quality of open spaces • Stewardship of areas can decline without lasting partnerships and continued public education • Planning for climate change (more heat, stronger storms, droughts, etc.) will increase and threaten parks • Burden property owners/ city on maintaining upkeep of open spaces July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 44 Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan SWOT Analysis | Combined Chapters 4/7/2021 | 9 Transportation Chapter Key Objectives: Evaluate the Transportation chapter on how well it integrates climate change and resiliency. Identify additional opportunities and risks of integrating climate change in future iterations of the Transportation chapter. Strengths Weaknesses • There is a policy that specifically mentions development of low carbon impact transportation. o P-4A.04 • Policy P-4B.14 explicitly mentions climate change. • Even when climate change isn’t mentioned, there are many climate-relevant or adjacent vocabulary that suggests that climate resiliency is prioritized in this chapter. o P-4A.01 o P-4A.02 o P-4A.03 • None of the goals have explicit mention of climate change or climate resiliency. Opportunities Threats • Opportunities to promote alternate modes of transportation that directly affect climate change. • Identify ways to make pedestrian and bike travel safer, easier, and more pleasurable through routes that users want to take. o Connect pedestrian and bike paths from west side of town to east side of town and downtown. o Create paths away from traffic over Valley Creek and Tumwater Creek to connect Lincoln Park to waterfront. • If “climate change” or other similar vocabulary isn’t explicitly included, there is the risk that climate change and resiliency will be overlooked in the implementation of the Comp Plan. • Policy P-4B.09 is not consistent with the rest of the chapter because it describes requiring off street parking. This encourages driving by ensuring excess parking infrastructure increases vehicle use and traffic. Multi-modal transportation reduces need for parking. o Remove this policy. July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 45 Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan SWOT Analysis | Combined Chapters 4/7/2021 | 10 Utilities and Public Services Chapter Key Objectives: Evaluate the Conservation chapter on how well it integrates climate change and resiliency. Identify additional opportunities and risks of integrating climate change in future iterations of the Utilities and Public Services chapter. Strengths Weaknesses • Goals may be interpreted to include climate mitigation and adaptation. • Goals and policies support DEIJ considerations (eg P5A-01/04/05) • Transportation, energy, and energy efficiency are three areas where significant opportunities exist for climate mitigation while delivering economic (reduced energy and transport costs) and other environmental benefits (eg reduction in other criteria pollutants) to the citizens . All three are promoted under Goal G- 5D. • no explicit mention climate risk and resilience to guide actions. • weak language (eg. G5D-05 uses “promote”) around climate friendly interventions Opportunities Threats • the chapter would benefit from some language the encourages development of “Climate Smart” infrastructure. (example – amend P5D.09 to reflect “climate smart” infrastructure; • explicit language and guidance to account for climate risk and resilience opens the door to reorienting current and future investments and support for various programs – for example P5B- 02 city’s financial support could then be contingent upon also including climate considerations in the feasibility studies and investment plans. • use stronger language for including climate considerations in decision making- • Where no regrets actions are clear (eg. energy efficiency, public transport, etc) use strong language in the document to prioritize • The chapter would benefit from some language the encourages development of “Climate Smart” infrastructure. (example – amend P5D.09 to reflect “climate smart” infrastructure; • Explicit language and guidance to account for climate risk and resilience opens the door to reorienting current and future investments and support for various programs – for example P5B- 02 city’s financial support could then be contingent upon also including climate considerations in the feasibility studies and investment plans. • Use stronger language for including climate considerations in decision making- • Where no regrets actions are clear (eg. energy efficiency, public transport, etc) use strong language in the document to prioritize July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 46 Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis | Housing chapter First Review: March 24, 2021 | 11 Housing Chapter Key Objectives: Evaluate the Conservation chapter on how well it integrates climate change and resiliency. Identify additional opportunities and risks of integrating climate change in future iterations of the Housing chapter. Strengths Weaknesses • City has a housing fund that could be used for grants to pay for developer fees for desirable projects. • The comprehensive plan should address the city’s dedicated “affordable housing finances” even though there is money set aside for these purposes. • Tree canopy cover tied to individual city lots – could promote tree and landscape requirements, to encourage (and/or reward) more trees in our community. Trees are necessary because of their ecological benefits, and the quality of life and desirability of a community. • P-6A.01 Weakness in Definition: what is a “housing opportunity”. Tents and RVs are opportunities if one is underhoused or unhoused and there are no other choices. So, does housing opportunity include temporary, makeshift, low-barrier entry. • P-6A.03 Encourage retention and development of safe and attractive mobile home parks. Weakness: the size requirements (several acres) of the existing mobile home requirements leaves very little space in city where a new park can occur. • P-6A.05 “promote acceptance” is vague, and nonsense. Opportunities Threats • P-6A.03 The city could make a distinction between mobile homes and “tiny homes” (stick built, not on trailers) to allow for regular city lots to accommodate such a development (with adequate parking, and not overload sewer/water/power). A city lot could have several tiny homes. • P-6A.03 The city could allow for several attractive tiny homes on trailers to create a mini-mobile home park with hookups, and landscape requirements. • “target household limits” could address definitions for: low, medium, or high income and tie to AMI area median income. • City could address Elder housing, as that will be the largest growing segment of our city population – to make better decisions regarding housing stock and needs. • Language is not clear. P-6A.02 Residential in all non-industrial zones “in situations where a limited work/live environment is found to be compatible” does not address the Port’s use of a warehouse for high-density homeless Covid housing. In that instance, was not subordinate to the industrial use element, and intent of industrial was not maintained. This needs clarification. • P-6A.07 “consider the effect of impact fees” Fees are the greatest impact on development. City must find ways to partner with developers, not gouge them for fees. • P-6A.12 ‘green building’ while desirable, also raises costs to build. Just as the G-5D Goal says “utility services in an efficient and cost- effective manner” is vague and prohibitive. Whose viewpoint is considered? Aspirational Analysis of Chapter: • I am looking at the comprehensive plan Housing with the goals and policies supporting climate. July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 47 Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis | Housing chapter First Review: March 24, 2021 | 12 • One thing I would like to point out that is in May 2011 there was a tree canopy assessment done for the city by Davey Resource Group. At the time, they found that we had 27.3% canopy cover our city, but mostly in private (not public) areas, and oddly enough the RS7 had only 17.8% canopy, which was lower than RHD at 18.9%. High density housing had better tree canopy, than our most common residential lots. • Since 2011 we have lost a LOT MORE canopy... besides our city cutting trees (Peabody, the big Sequoia dubbed "hope", the trees at Lincoln Park, 2016 removing all 38 downtown trees, etc) we have lost a great number of trees from private city lots, and with development projects that never had any standards on what kind of canopy cover should exist. We even lost the famous Madrona because of sidewalk and road changes which disrupted the root systems. • I don't even know if current redesign goals for arterials include trees. (But I know that from improper pruning we have had great tree loss on the greenbelts). In 2018, we developed a "tree board' to try and get an Arbor Day classification for TreeCityUSA, something I have heard nothing about over the last four years. In 2019, it was reported in the PDN that the tree board was disbanded. • We have a lip-service ordinance that is mostly for electric service street tree pruning. • Our tree ordinance, is MOSTLY about city owned trees, however I have NOT seen the reality of "13.010(2) When street tree(s) are removed, trees greater than six inches in diameter at breast height whall be replaced at a ratio of two new trees per removed tree, all trees less than six inches in diameter shall be replaced at a ratio of one new tree per removed tree." • And, for things like the tree fund at Lincoln Park, all funds were diverted to Civic Field (loudspeaker system) and, I do not know where the "Community Forester Fund" exists. Our ordinance also makes note of a "community forrester" to be appointed by city manager but, does this exist? • We have lost too many trees... • At 2011 levels our canopy cover is comparable to current Seattle (28%) canopy but THEY have a goal of increasing their canopy to 30% by 2037. • We have no such goal anywhere in the Comprehensive Plan. • Through the natural process of photosynthesis, trees absorb CO2 and other pollutant particulates, then store the carbon and emit pure oxygen. It is a simple concept that could go far to not only make our community more attractive, but, also, fight climate change. Trees also increase a neighborhood's "desirability" but offer other tangible benefits. • The 2011 Davey Resource Group conclusion recommended increasing our tree canopy to 47.9%. • Taking into consideration that the City of Port Angeles includes 2,453 surface acres of open water, mostly in the harbor, the assessment found an overall average tree canopy cover of 27.3% over land areas. Rough estimatesof potential planting areassuggest that Port Angeles may be able to support an overall tree canopy cover of 47.9%.Establishing policies now that conserveand increase the overall net canopy and thebenefit stream from this important resource will ensure that it is preserved for current residentsand wildlifeas well as for future generations. • They identified goals that were recommended to the City of Port Angeles a decade ago. These goals,still desirable today, were: July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 48 Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis | Housing chapter First Review: March 24, 2021 | 13 • Preserve and expand overall net canopy. Considering that Port Angeles' current overall canopy cover is 27.3% (excluding areas of surface water) and the general recommendation for communities in the Pacific Northwest is 40% (American Forests), preserving the current overall net canopy cover is important. • • Protect existing trees where possible, maximize the stocking level for street trees, and increase canopy in parks and open spaces.Set canopy goals. Canopy goals can be broad based, or specific to land use. When determining canopy goals, consider the importance of trees and forests to meeting the environmental and quality of life goals of the community. Ideally, tree canopy goals should be adopted as a component of the Urban Forest Master Plan along with the City's Comprehensive Plan. • Promote trees and tree canopy as an efficient solution to stormwater management. Integrate current and evolving design standards that reduce stormwater runoff and support urban tree growth, including pervious pavement, suspended pavement, linear tree pits, and forested bioswales. • Augment tree canopy cover to maximize the capture and reuse of stormwater management areas, thereby reducing runoff and pollution into surface waters and the Strait. • Promote community outreach. Develop materials, presentations, and press releases that promote the importance and value of trees and canopy to the community, especially for reducing wind velocity and stormwater management. • Consider providing an annual report to detail the state of the urban forest, including canopy loss and/or gain. Identify areas for new tree planting. Identify locations where forestlands compliment community design and scenic views. • Increase new tree planting to replace canopy lost to development or redesign. • Encourage and facilitate partnerships and collaborations. Work with developers and homeowner associations to identify and preserve conservation areas and potential forest tracts. Promote clustered developments, preservation of existing trees and tree planting projects that compliment views, while reducing wind velocity and providing opportunities for passive recreation. Collaborate with volunteer groups to assist with Tree planting projects. • Tree ordinances are just starting to show up across the country. A tree ordinance establishes authorization and standards for addressing a wide range of issues regarding trees. They should be developed and implemented as part of a broader effort to identify and address a community’s tree-related goals. • full Davey report: ftp://ftp.austintexas.gov/GIS- Data/Community_Forestry/Alan_Halter/H/Accuracy_Assessment_Canopy2010/References/Port%20Angeles%20accuracy%20assessmen t.pdf • USFS report about importance of tree canopy: https://www.fs.fed.us/nrs/pubs/jrnl/2018/nrs_2018_nowak_005.pdf • Guidelines for developing tree ordinances: https://conservationtools.org/library_items/597 • There are also resources on how to develop a community tree inventory. July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 49 Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis | Housing chapter First Review: March 24, 2021 | 14 Conservation Chapter Key Objectives: Evaluate the Conservation chapter on how well it integrates climate change and resiliency. Identify additional opportunities and risks of integrating climate change in future iterations of the Conservation chapter. Strengths Weaknesses • Place-based development in harmony with local environment is important for resilience (7A.01, 7A.02, 7A.03) • Reference to climate change in numerous plan elements (7A.10, etc.) • Focus on conservation of wetlands, riparian areas, and other natural areas, along with explicit support for tree cover, is in line with climate change mitigation • Reference to reducing greenhouse gas emissions (7B.18, 7B.19) • Explicit focus on community education surrounding environmental resources is a direct endorsement of community organizing for climate change mitigation (7C) • Vague statements are hard to implement with concrete policy measures (7A.04 – “natural constraints” is not defined) • Policies that have already been implemented should be removed or revised to reflect future goals (7A.05 – minimum development standards; 7A.06) • The overall number of policies should be reduced through combination or elimination to make future goals and policies more clear and simple for policymakers – there are many redundancies (ex – 7B.01 and 7B.03) • Reference to regulations impacting policies should include links to exact sections of municipal code, for reference and review (ex – 7B.07 has been enacted through stormwater investments – these should be linked so that progress in area is known; 7D – should link to Shoreline Master Plan and should avoid redundancy) • References to climate change are often indirect and not clear about the distinct causes and effects of climate change (ex – 7B.06) Opportunities Threats • There is an opportunity to streamline the number of goals and policies to make the entire document most easily understandable without sacrificing the content of policies suggested • Explicit mention of both climate change adaptation and climate change mitigation could be included to link together the importance of different policies (such as policies suggesting riparian conservation and policies suggesting shoreline conservation) in a larger climate framework • Too many goals/policies, including many which are redundant, threaten to confuse policymakers and citizens when trying to apply the plan • Unclear definitions of key terms, and vague reference to “climate change”, threatens a lack of coordination among community members in addressing issues • More explicit mention of development goals than climate change goals could lead to prioritization of development over conservation. July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 50 Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis | Housing chapter First Review: March 24, 2021 | 15 •There is an opportunity to make the linkages between the plan’s goals/policies and the underlying laws/legal standards that impact them (municipal code, state law, federal law, etc.) much more clear and easily accessible, creating a single resource to be used by policymakers and citizens where all relevant information is included in one place alongside recommended policies and actions •Lack of envisioning possible futures – such as drastic sea level rise, drought and water scarcity, climate migration amid housing shortage – in explicit terms in the plan threatens to leave the city unprepared for the larger variety of future possibilities under a changing climate. July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 51 Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis | Capital Facilities First Review: March 24, 2021 | 16 Capital Facilities - Chapter 8 Key Objectives: Evaluate the Conservation chapter on how well it integrates climate change and resiliency. Identify additional opportunities and risks of integrating climate change in future iterations of the Capital Facilities chapter. Strengths Weaknesses • Multiple Policies directly and indirectly relate to climate resiliency. • The chapter references several other Plans, Programs, Documents, Policies, and Acts that directly and indirectly relate to climate resiliency. (County-Wide Planning Policy, State Growth Management Act, Capital Facilities Plan, Parks and Recreation Plan, Urban Forestry Program) • The chapter directly states a goal of "consider[ing] projected climate change impacts and adaptation strategies to determine whether adequate services can be provided into the future, prior to approving any development." P-8A.22 • The chapter directly references developing Green Infrastructure and Low Impact Development P-8D.02 • Multiple policies could easily have a climate resiliency component, but it's not mentioned. • Goal G-8B is focused on streets and utilities. With the exception of one policy referencing stormwater run-off, nothing is related to climate resiliency. Opportunities Threats • Add a reference to climate resiliency where applicable to current goals and policies when not already directly referenced. Example: P-8D.02 The City should invest in Green Infrastructure, Low Impact Development (LID), and similar technologies to maintain and enhance environmental quality and climate resiliency. • Several goals and policies referencing working and cooperating with other agencies (School district, the State, the County, and others). However, the other agencies may have different or nonexistent climate change and resiliency plans making it more difficult to cooperate. • No matter how inclusive or thorough climate resiliency objectives are integrated into the Comp Plan, it's up to the City Council to implement them. Different Council members have different focuses. Goals and Policies Supporting Climate Resiliency: • P-8A.11 Adopt a Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Plan consistent with the Comprehensive Plan and the Growth Management Act as an Element of the Comprehensive Plan. July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 52 Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis | Capital Facilities First Review: March 24, 2021 | 17 • P-8A.12 Require should use permeable materials where feasible. • P-8A.13 Develop and implement an Urban Forestry Program. • P-8A.15 Consider climatic change impacts and adaptation strategies in planning and designing capital facilities. • P-8A.17 Deny any development that will not be served at or greater than a citywide level of service standard of 10 acres of parks per 1,000 population within six years from the time of development. • P-8B.09 Develop a Capital Facilities Plan list, with public input, for prioritizing pedestrian walkway needs. • G-8D To reduce the amount of impervious surface created by new developments and thereby reduce stormwater management costs and environmental impacts to the City and its natural resources, reduce development costs to private property owners, and provide safe and more attractive streets through traffic calming, safe pedestrian amenities, and improved street edge landscaping. • P-8D.02 The City should invest in Green Infrastructure, Low Impact Development (LID), and similar technologies to maintain and enhance environmental quality. July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 53 Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan SWOT Analysis | Parks and Recreation chapter 4/7/2021 | 18 Parks and Recreation – Chapter 10 Key Objectives: Evaluate the Parks and Recreation chapter on how well it integrates climate change and resiliency. Identify additional opportunities and risks of integrating climate change in future iterations of the Parks and Recreation chapter. Strengths Weaknesses •Parks and Recreation promotes outdoor engagement. More outdoor use heightens people’s sensitivity to climate change. o Promoting walking and biking has potential to reduce vehicle use. •One policy reflects climate change goals: o P-10D.01 •There is no explicit wording related to climate change in this chapter. •No examples of resiliency Opportunities Threats •There are opportunities to increase park use and enjoyment as climate changes: o Increase sheltering like overhangs and trees if precipitation increases. o Increase sheltering like overhangs and trees if precipitation decreases. o Re-enforce shoreline to protect against rising sea levels •Allow rain gardens where appropriate land exists. Streets create huge amounts of run off. City could use its assets to its advantage. Parks are not typically in use when it is raining anyway. Bring in more birds to parks. Small depressions on edges of parks can provide more attractive features with native vegetation. •Parks and Recreation is concerned with the interaction of individuals with the outdoor environment. Climate change directly impacts this. •If “climate change” or other similar vocabulary isn’t explicitly included, there is the risk that climate change and resiliency will be overlooked in the implementation of the Comp Plan. July 28, 2021 Planning Commission Agenda Packet pg. 54