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PC Agenda Packet 2022-05-25AGENDA PLANNING COMMISSION Held Virtually: https://www.cityofpa.us/984/Live-Virtual-Meetings May 25, 2022 6:00 p.m. I.CALL TO ORDER II.ROLL CALL III.PUBLIC COMMENT IV.APPROVAL OF MINUTES. Minutes of May 11, 2022 V.DISCUSSION AND POTENTIAL ACTION 1.Action: PZ 22-35 Comprehensive Plan Amendment Continued Public Hearing Continued public hearing for the adoption of the draft Climate Resiliency Plan and inclusion into the 2022 Comprehensive Plan Amendment VI.STAFF UPDATES VII.REPORTS OF COMMISSION MEMBERS VIII.ADJOURNMENT MINUTES PLANNING COMMISSION Held Virtually Port Angeles, Washington 98362 May 11, 2022, 6:00 p.m. REGULAR MEETING Chair Stanley opened the regular meeting at 6:02 p.m. ROLL CALL Commissioners Present: Ben Stanley (Chair), Steve Luxton, Colin Young, Richie Ahuja, Andrew Schwab, Marolee Smith, and Tammy Dziadek Commissioners Absent: Colin Young – Excused City Staff Present: Emma Bolin (Interim Director of CED) Ben Braudrick (Associate Planner) Nathan Docherty (Assistant Planner) Holden Fleming (Housing Coordinator) Public Present: Adrian Hoban, Brian Mattuch, Sean Halberg, Bob Vreeland, Brian Grad, Ian Miller, Jesse Waknitz, Sean Halberg, Susan Schlicher, Tony Billera, Ed Chad PUBLIC COMMENT: Chair Stanley opened the general public comment period: Brian Grad S poke to the importance of local or i entation to the climate resiliency effort. Asked what we are willing to relinquish due to the effects of climate change. Ed Chad S poke on the difficulty of using Webex and would like there to be an easier way to access meetings. Chair Stanley closed public comment at 6:13 pm. A PPROVAL OF MINUTES: April 13th, 2022, and April 27th, 2022. Planning Commission Minutes May 11, 2022 Page 2 ACTION ITEM 1. Climate Resiliency Plan Public Hearing Planner Braudrick presented the staff report for the Draft Climate Resiliency Plan Chair Stanley outlined the process for the public hearing and opened the hearing to public comment. Bob Vreeland Saw that the plan addresses sea level rise but wondered about forest fire vulnerability. Voiced concern about developments that are near forested areas at the edge of the city. He also voiced concern over the language to disincentivize development not including forest fire vulnerability. Wondered if there would be an appendix of actions that were not used but were considered. Asked to consider a carbon tax. Brian Grad Defined psychological resilience. Resilience means there is something to bounce back from. Felt that it wasn’t five minutes to midnight, but instead five minutes after midnight due to methane releases from the arctic permafrost regions. Concerned about the lack of power available from local sources. How are we going to have capable capacity for local resources and basic law and order. Things are changing rapidly. Brian M Pointed out that the document was listed in the metadata as Vancouver. Pointed out that people from Vancouver and the consultants will not have to live with the consequences of this plan. Referenced the terminologies “managed retreat”, “disincentivize development”, and “add filing to property record”. Voiced concern about the implication of this language and the Planning Commission approving a document they hadn’t read fully. Ed Chad Made it clear that the document wasn’t from Vancouver, that it was just a template. Reiterated staff’s presentation regarding the timeline for the process, the opportunity for public input, and the amount of input that is represented in the plan. Agreed with prior comments about the hard times for the community ahead and the importance of having a strong climate action plan. Every tenth of a degree of increased average temperature has a great deal of impact on the severity of storms, wildfires, drought, ocean acidification, and the death of our salmon population. We have to do our part, no matter how small, to decrease suffering. Acting now will save money later. State grants might soon require this plan be adopted. Ian Miller Had three comments on the plan: Wanted to know why some items were earmarked to be included in the Comprehensive Plan and others weren’t; to be able to see the multicriteria analysis results and how the actions were ranked; and to know why the description for the Planning Commission Minutes May 11, 2022 Page 3 action to retrofit buildings for vulnerability was much broader than the title. He also found the action suggesting shoreline protection at bluff crests confusing. Tony Billera Even with the pledges we see today there is still a projected 4.3 degrees of increased temperatures in this century. The current policies get us to 3.1 degrees if the policies are effective. Another four to five degrees in 70 years leaves us with an unsustainable planet. It would be a terrible outcome for human civilization. There is a lot we can do for our small community. A focus on adaption is critical for success. Bob Vreeland Thanks staff and Planning Commission for the work that has been done. What has been presented is a pretty good start to outline what needs to be done. Felt that resiliency is defined on page six of the plan. Developers might not like words like “disincentivize”, but the city needs to protect itself. There are legal consequences that the city could face from climate-related weather and disaster events that destroy property. Adrian Hogan Agreed that getting on the meeting was difficult. Chair Stanley ended the public comment period. He opened a period of deliberation for Commissions and a potential motion. Commissioner Smith asked how the plan could be implemented if all City Departments are not working together. Chair Stanley agreed that lack of communication was one of the main issues that derails any type of sustainability plan. Planner Braudrick explained that the City Council will be adopting this plan, and that the Plan will guide Council action. The Council can direct City Staff, including directors to implement the plan. How that happens is up to them. We built this plan to be a guide. This is why getting the initial actions related to climate action in the Comprehensive Plan was so important and led to the inclusion of climate action in the Council’s strategic planning efforts. The next step is implementation. Vice Chair Schwab opined that he would like to see the motion to continue the public hearing to May 25th in order to allow for more public comment due to the difficulties with the Webex platform that have been expressed by the public. Chair Stanley expressed his general disappointment that the public process was entirely virtual due to the Covid pandemic. He would have liked to extend the process to include in-person meetings and increase the attendance and input. Commissioners Dziadek mentioned her fresh perspective to Plan being new to the Commission. She was impressed with the time and energy that has gone into it. The issues we are facing are very complex and difficult to solve. Chair Stanley referenced both the written and verbal comments made about insurance, financing, and other things involving properties on the shoreline. He had some concerns about the language as well. He doesn’t want the plan to discourage development on the Planning Commission Minutes May 11, 2022 Page 4 waterfront. Its been documented that Port Angeles may not see as much impact from sea level rise as other communities on the Peninsula. Commissioner Smith commented on the realities of insurance rates being affected by events on a national scale. Chair Stanley recommended that the language be changed on the actions related to insurance. He also wanted clarification on language brought up by Ian Miller about shoreline armoring and bluff armoring. Planner Braudrick read the actions 46 and 47 that Chair Stanley was referring to. Chair Stanley recognized that a lot of the plan that was presented was crafted with our community in mind, but that Cascadia has worked with many communities and the plan did start with some boilerplate language that apply to municipalities across Western Washington. He felt that the plan could address issues less broadly and be more specific about different regions within the City. He asked for a motion. Commissioner Smith agreed that the public comment period should be continued, if not just for the Webex issues. Commissioners Dziadek and Ahuja agreed. Commissioner Ahuja felt that implementation was missing from the plan and that five or six actions should be provided for immediate implementation. Chair Stanley agreed. Commissioner Smith made a motion to continue the Climate Resiliency plan until the May 25th meeting Commissioner Schwab seconded the motion, and all were in approval. 2. Staff Presentation on Commissioner Luxton’s Draft Letter and Continued Discussion. Interim Director Bolin presented staff’s feasibility analysis for the three individual requests presented in a letter Commissioner Luxton drafted on behalf of the Planning Commission. Planning Commission and staff discussion followed. Commissioner Luxton made a motion to formally forward the letter as written to the City Council for inclusion into their packet.as a discussion item. Commissioner Ahuja seconded the motion. Discussion followed. Commissioner Ahuja offered a friendly amendment to the motion. The motion states: Noting urgency of situation of homelessness in PA and recognizing that low cost housing is the urgent need of the hour, the Planning Commission offers the attached letter from Commissioner Luxton for consideration. We urge the Council to identify a pathway that would immediately address including homelessness in the City and to develop a better long-term plan to support housing. The Commission stands ready to work with the Council as required to work on this. We recognize the staff has shared their perspective and process required to address this issue. We find incumbent on us to recognize the urgency to take immediate action and Planning Commission Minutes May 11, 2022 Page 5 act upon this. The motion passed 5-1, with Commissioner Schwab dissenting due to the length of the motion. STAFF UPDATES Interim Director Bolin introduced Holden Fleming the City’s new Housing Coordinator and detailed his job responsibilities. Coordinator Fleming thanked the Planning Commission for their time. Planner Braudrick thanked everyone of the conversations that were held on the Climate Resiliency Plan and reminded that it was “Bike Everywhere Month”. REPORTS OF COMMISSION MEMBERS Vice Chair Schwab and Co mmissioners Ahuja, Smith, and Luxton provided the Planning Co mmission with reports. ADJOURNMENT Commissioner Smith moved to adjourn the meeting. Commissioner Ahuja seconded the motion, all were in approval. The meeting adjourned at 8:46 p.m. Ben Braudrick, Secretary Ben Stanley, Chair PREPARED BY: Ben Braudrick, Secretary TO: Planning Commission FROM: Ben Braudrick, Associate Planner MEETING DATE: May 25, 2022 RE: 2022 Comprehensive Plan Amendment Application No. 22-35 APPLICANT: City of Port Angeles Department of Community and Economic Development LOCATION: Citywide REQUEST: Annual amendment process to the City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan to meet the requirements of the Washington State Growth Management Act. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND BACKGROUND The City of Port Angeles performs an annual amendment cycle for the Comprehensive Plan. All proposed amendments to the Comprehensive Plan are considered concurrently on an annual basis from July 1st through June 30th and can be adopted no more than once during this period, except those amendments conforming to the GMA may also be adopted whenever an emergency exists. Comprehensive Plan amendment proposals must be submitted no later than March 31st. The City did not receive any amendment proposals from the public. In Fall of 2018, City Council finalized a two-year strategic plan outlining priority projects for the next two years. A priority during that process was based on equity of distribution of workflow among departments. Numerous projects were identified for the Community and Economic Development Department, but housing related items became the primary focus of the 2019/2020 work effort. As a result, the Climate Action Plan was assigned to the Fire Department for completion in 2019. In November the Fire Department in conjunction with the ad hoc Climate Action Planning Group (CAPG) put a series of recommendations to City Council that resulted in the follow up work being assigned to the Planning Commission. The Planning Commission formed a subcommittee which regularly met for one hour twice per month prior to the regular planning commission meeting. Between December 2019 and February 2020 the city facilitated four open public subcommittee meetings. With staff facilitation, the subcommittee recommended a workplan for Planning Commission consideration, drafted a list of suggested volunteer tasks and objectives, and collected a list of potential volunteers. P&Z Application No. 22-35 | City-Wide 2 |Staff Report Due to issues that arose related to the Public Records and Open Public Meetings Acts during the Planning Commission subcommittee led greenhouse gas inventory and climate action plan, planning staff requested that City Council allocate funding in order to produce a request for proposal and contract with a private consultant to assist in producing a greenhouse gas study and Climate Resiliency Plan. In February of 2020 City Council directed staff to pursue a consultant to complete the City’s climate resiliency planning effort and in November of 2020 City Council approved the selection of Cascadia Consulting to complete four tasks: (1) Kick-Off Meeting & Project Management, (2) Public Outreach & Participation Plan, (3) Community & Municipal Greenhouse Gas Inventory, and (4) Climate Resiliency Plan. A project kick-off meeting (See Appendix C) took place in January of 2021 with City Staff, City Council Climate Action Subcommittee members, Planning Commission CAPG members, a volunteer member of the CAPG, and the Clallam County Internal Climate Taskforce Leader. A Greenhouse Gas Inventory (See Appendix B) and Public Outreach Plan (See Appendix D) were adopted in coordination with city staff, Planning Commission, the Council Climate Action Subcommittee, and CAPG volunteer input. Staff also led the Planning Commission in a Climate Action SWOT analysis of each Comprehensive Plan element (See Appendix E). These initial planning efforts helped to guide the creation of the Climate Resiliency Plan. Two virtual community workshops took place at integral steps in the plan’s development. The first, on November 17th workshop focused on the goals and priorities of the plan (See Appendix F). The second workshop, held on March 16th focused on the Plan’s strategies, actions, and multicriteria analysis (See Appendix G). Each step was initiated by staff and the consultant and was reviewed by the CAPG volunteers, Planning Commission, and Council Climate Action Subcommittee. Each of these processes informed the next step and engagement opportunities and the collective result of all aforementioned individual efforts is the Draft Climate Resiliency Plan that is provided as Appendix A of this staff report. PROPOSED PLAN ELEMENTS The plan is built to mirror the planning and public engagement process that was detailed in the executive summary. It introduces the purpose and background of the plan, details the process and results of the greenhouse gas inventory, describes the goals strategies and actions, and outlines the planned next steps for an implementation process that is scheduled to begin in June 2022. Greenhouse Gas Study The greenhouse gas study is broken into both municipal government and community-wide inventories and categorizes emissions into several sectors, including: P&Z Application No. 22-35 | City-Wide 3 |Staff Report Municipal Government Emissions • Buildings & Facilities • Streetlights & Traffic Signals • Vehicle Fleet • Solid Waste Facilities • Water & Wastewater Treatment Facilities Community Emissions • Commercial Energy • Industrial Energy • Process & Fugitive Emissions • Residential Energy • Solid Waste • Transportation • Upstream Impacts of Activities • Water & Wastewater The Resiliency Plan itself is broken down into five sectors. The sectors include: • Community Health and Wellbeing; • Ecosystem Health; • Transportation; • Buildings and Energy; and • Consumption and Waste Each sector includes goals that focus on the broad interest of the sector, city progress, and community-wide progress. The first public workshop served to direct what goals should be included and what goals didn’t fit Port Angeles’ unique circumstances. Two strategies defining the success of the plan are included in each sector and actions are provided that define how that success will be achieved. In all, 70 actions are included in the plan, 40 of which went through a multicriteria analysis (MCA) to evaluate the actions relative performance based upon impact, equity, affordability, feasibility, community support, and co-benefits. The MCA process is new to the City’s comprehensive planning efforts. The process is designed to assess a representative set of priority actions as well as actions that may be controversial or need additional refinement. It is very important to note that this means that some of the most promising actions were intentionally excluded from the MCA, due of a high confidence each would be included in the Plan. Conversely, less promising actions (e.g., less impactful, more controversial) were included in the MCA, to gather more data on whether they were appropriate for Port Angeles P&Z Application No. 22-35 | City-Wide 4 |Staff Report to pursue. Whether or not an action was evaluated with the MCA is not an indicator of its overall level of priority, impact, or importance—all actions in the Plan are recommended for implementation. Finally, indicators are provided that serve to measure the relative success various strategies and actions developed during the outreach process achieve in meeting the goals within that element. The indicators provide a metric for the relative success of the Plan’s strategies and actions that serve to improve each sector and, as an outcome, quality of life in the City of Port Angeles. PROCEDURE: On April 22, 2022 the Planning Division submitted its 60 day notice of intent to amend the City’s Comprehensive Plan to the Washington State Department of Commerce (WSDOC). In accordance Port Angeles Municipal Code Chapter 18.04.040 states that Planning Commission will conduct a public hearing on the Amendment prior to or during May and City Council public hearings will be conducted prior to or during June. City Council’s decision shall be rendered no later than June 30. This meets the requirements of the Washington State Department of Commerce. Notice of the application was provided on the following dates and in the following manner: 1. 4/22/22: Notice to WSDOC of Intent to Amend the Comprehensive Plan 2. 5/5/22: City of Port Angeles Website 3. 5/6/22: City Hall, Notice Board 4. 5/7/22: Peninsula Daily News, Circulation COMMENTS: The public comment period is 14 days, closing on May 21, 2022. No public comment has yet been submitted associated with this public comment period. The Director requested that Planning Commission review and provide feedback and suggested changes to Draft Climate Resiliency Plan. FINDINGS OF FACT & STAFF ANALYSIS Analysis and findings of fact from Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED) Staff are based on the entirety of the application materials, Port Angeles Municipal Code (PAMC), standards, plans, public comment, and all other materials available during the review period. Collectively the information contained in the staff report is the record of the review. The findings and analysis section this report are a summary of the DCED Staff completed review. Port Angeles Municipal Code Section 18.04.040 - Annual amendment cycle. All proposed amendments to the Comprehensive Plan shall be considered concurrently on an annual basis from July 1st through June 30th and shall be adopted no more than once during said period, except that amendments conforming to the GMA may also be adopted whenever an P&Z Application No. 22-35 | City-Wide 5 |Staff Report emergency exists. Amendment proposals should be submitted, public hearings will be conducted, and action shall be taken, in accordance with the following schedule: A. Comprehensive Plan amendment proposals shall be submitted no later than March 31st; Staff Analysis: The Comprehensive Plan amendment proposal was submitted as a part of the 2022 City of Port Angeles work plan. B. The Washington State Department of Community, Trade and Economic Development (CTED) shall be notified of Comprehensive Plan amendment proposals no later than May 1st; Staff Analysis: The Planning Commission provided notice to the Washington State Department of Commerce on April 22, 2022. C. Planning Commission hearings will be conducted prior to or during May; Staff Analysis: A Planning Commission public hearing is scheduled for May 11, 2022. D. City Council hearings will be conducted prior to or during June; Staff Analysis: A City Council public hearing is scheduled for June 7, 2022 E. The City Council's decision shall be rendered no later than June 30th and shall be transmitted to CTED within ten days after final adoption. The proposed amendments meet the requirements of the Washington State Department of Commerce for periodic updating of the Comprehensive Plan. The requirements of the Washington State Department of Ecology to modify the City's approach to stormwater management have been incorporated into the Comprehensive Plan. Staff Analysis: A City Council Decision is scheduled for June 21, 2022. Section 18.04.060 - Comprehensive Plan amendment elements. Comprehensive Plan amendments shall address the following elements: A. Demonstration of why existing Comprehensive Plan provision(s) should not continue in effect; Staff Analysis: The proposed amendment is adding a Climate Resiliency Plan to the Comprehensive Plan as an associated document. The proposal is integrating new policy that does not directly replace or conflict with existing goals and policies. B. Demonstration of how the amendment complies with the Growth Management Act's goals and specific requirements; Staff Analysis: Proposed changes are not in conflict with the Plan’s current compliance with the Growth Management Act, as they are meant to make the current Plan reflect current issues facing the City of Port Angeles over the next 20 years. C. Demonstration of how the amendment complies with the County-wide planning policies; P&Z Application No. 22-35 | City-Wide 6 |Staff Report Staff Analysis: Proposed changes are not in conflict with the Plan’s current compliance with the Clallam County-Wide Planning Policies as they are proposing municipal and citywide practices that are more sustainable, reduce environmental impacts, reduce waste, and promote regional economic and environmental resilience. D. Demonstration of how the amendment is consistent with the Capital Facilities Plan and the comprehensive services and facilities plans; Staff Analysis: Proposed changes may instigate the revision of some of the Capital Facilities Plan projects. The Climate Resiliency Plan is not directive it is a policy document that includes goals to reduce the city’s carbon footprint using greenhouse gas emissions as a metric. The Plan’s policies include draft indicators that will assist in measuring the success of the Plan’s implementation. The Plan poses no conflict. It does propose changes to city operations and capital projects to be more sustainable, cost effective, consider long range effects, reduce environmental impacts, reduce waste, and promote regional and environmental resilience. E. Demonstration of how the amendment is in the public interest and is consistent with the public health, safety and welfare; Staff Analysis: Proposed changes continue support of the public interest and seek to improve public health, safety, and welfare by providing policy guidance to reduce cost of City services promote sustainability, consider long range planning and economic decision-making, reduce environmental impacts, reduce waste, and promote regional and environmental resilience. F. Consideration of the cumulative effect of all proposed Comprehensive Plan amendments. Staff Analysis: The cumulative effect of the proposed amendment is a Plan that better prioritizes sustainable City development and better directs the City Council in its efforts to improve the City of Port Angeles for the benefit of all its residents and the environment. 18.04.080 - Comprehensive Plan amendment public hearings and notice. A. Public hearings on Comprehensive Plan amendments shall be conducted by the Planning Commission and the City Council in accordance with the schedule set forth in PAMC 18.04.040. Staff Analysis: Public Hearings will be held on May 11, 2022 for the Planning Commission and June 4, 2019 for the City Council. B. Notice of public hearings on Comprehensive Plan amendments shall be provided in the same manner as set forth in PAMC 17.96.140 for public hearings required pursuant to the Zoning Code. Staff Analysis: Notice has been provided via the City Website on May 5, 2022, City Notice board on May 6, 2022, and Peninsula Daily News legal advertisement on May 7, 2022. P&Z Application No. 22-35 | City-Wide 7 |Staff Report 18.04.090 - Comprehensive Plan amendment decisions. A. The Planning Commission shall make a recommendation to the City Council on all Comprehensive Plan amendments. Staff Analysis: Staff has incorporated suggested edits from the Planning Commission and has recommended that the Planning Commission recommend approval of the 2022 Comprehensive Plan Amendments on either May 11, 2022 or May 25, 2022 with a continued public hearing. B. The City Council shall make the final decision on all Comprehensive Plan amendments. The Council's decision shall be supported by written findings and conclusions, which shall address the elements set forth in PAMC 18.04.060. Staff Analysis: City Council will make a final decision on the 2022 Comprehensive Plan Amendment on June 21, 2022. Environmental Review The City has issued a Determination of Non-Significance (No. 1448) for this proposed action on May 7, 2022, per WAC 197-11-340. Consistency In preparation and submission of a Comprehensive Plan Amendment application, City Staff has demonstrated that all standards will be met in accordance with the Port Angeles Municipal Code and RCW 36.70a. Recommendation The Planning Division proposes the Planning Commission recommend adoption of the Climate Resiliency Plan and approval of the 2022 Annual Comprehensive Plan Amendment (Application No. 22-35) citing 3 conclusions in support of that action. DECISION, CONCLUSIONS, & CONDITIONS Having reviewed and considered the staff report, application materials, public comment, and all the information presented, the Planning Division is providing the following two alternative recommendations to the Planning Commission: 1. Provide any final suggested changes to the Comprehensive Plan to be included in the recommendation to City Council with any minor changes based upon continued public comment and staff input; or 2. Recommend approval of the 2022 Annual Comprehensive Plan Amendment (Application No. 22-35) to City Council with any minor changes based upon continued public comment and staff input, citing: a. Appendix A – Climate Resiliency Plan; b. Appendix B – Greenhouse Gas Inventory Council Memo; P&Z Application No. 22-35 | City-Wide 8 |Staff Report c. Appendix C – Climate Resiliency Plan Kickoff Notes; d. Appendix D – Climate Resiliency Plan Public Outreach Plan; e. Appendix E – Comprehensive Plan SWOT Analysis; f. Appendix F & G – Public Workshop synopses; g. Appendix H – MCA Approach; h. Appendix I – MCA Matrix; i. Appendix J – CAPG MCA Results; j. Appendix K – Public Comment Matrix, and the following 3 conclusions in support of that action: 1. The proposed amendments to the Comprehensive Plan are in compliance with the State’s requirements for updating the Comprehensive Plan under the Growth Management Act and with Section 18.04.040 of the Port Angeles Municipal Code. 2. The Comprehensive Plan amendments are not in conflict with the City’s development regulations or Capital Facilities Plan and will not reduce the level of service required by the Comprehensive Plan for those urban services necessary to serve development projects. 3. The Comprehensive Plan was last thoroughly reviewed and amended in 2019. This 2022 amendment is a part of a City recognized annual amendment cycle. APPENDICES A – Draft Climate Resiliency Plan B – Greenhouse Gas Inventory Council Memo C – Kick Off Meeting Notes D – Public Outreach Plan E – Planning Commission Comprehensive Plan SWOT Analysis F – November 19 Workshop Results G – March 16 Workshop Results CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS Port Angeles CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN DRAFT | MAY 6, 2022 Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN WELCOME MAY 6 , 2022 | 1 Welcome On behalf of the City Council, I am proud to introduce the City of Port Angeles’ Climate Resiliency Plan. Port Angeles residents, elected and appointed officials, and staff place a priority on sustainable land use and building practices, resilience of our natural systems, and a focus on reducing the City’s carbon footprint as a way to measure our independence, self-reliance, and quality of life. This is a community-initiated plan that began when Olympic Climate Action requested inclusion of climate action related goals and policies during the 2016 Comprehensive Plan Periodic Update. This direction became a catalyst for City Council to add climate action to our 2019-2020 Strategic Plan. In November 2019 the recently formed community Climate Action Planning Group (CAPG) provided the Council with recommendations that laid the path for the plan in front of you. This path included one of the most robust public participation and engagement processes that the City of Port Angeles has ever undertaken, which is especially remarkable given a necessary transition to virtual engagement during the COVID-19 pandemic. The CAPG has remained a sounding board for the plan’s various elements and iterations and the community’s input has provided invaluable guidance that has shaped and prioritized the vision, goals, policies, and actions within the Plan. This plan is the first of its kind for Port Angeles and will assist in directing measurable action supporting system-wide waste and energy/water use reductions, sustainable land use, transportation and economic development, and social and environmental health and equity that celebrates our community’s diversity. This plan shifts the City’s focus recognizing the importance of contributing to sustainability through public projects that connect trails and transit, encouraging commercial development that provides jobs and services to neighborhoods, and supporting innovative Low Impact Development stormwater and building practices. If the community is to make a significant difference in their impact on local and global systems, however, it will be because of individual, household, and business choices. Resilience is not exclusively about self-reliance. This plan recognizes the need for local and regional partnerships that will strengthen and support sustainability across the North Olympic Peninsula. These connections will empower our region’s adaptation to sea-level rise, natural disasters such as drought, flooding and wildfire, and global supply chain unpredictability. We want to thank all of you who contributed to the formation and success of this planning process. This Climate Resiliency Plan provides the city with the direction for how to best prepare for radical changes so that future generations will be able to enjoy the same quality of life, natural beauty, and clean air and water that we do today. Kate Dexter, Mayor City of Port Angeles Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN THANK YOU MAY 6 , 2022 | 2 Thank You The City of Port Angeles is grateful to the following individuals and organizations for their contributions to develop the Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan. City of Port Angeles Allyson Brekke, Community & Economic Development Ben Braudrick, Community & Economic Development Brian Coburn, Public Works Equipment Services Division Brian Smith, Police Department Bruce Dorcy, Public Works Solid Waste Collection Division Cody Romero, Public Works Street Division Emma Bolin, Community & Economic Development Gregg King, Public Works Power Systems Division Jeff Groves, Public Works Water Ken Dubuc, Fire Department Meggan Uecker, Public Works Solid Waste Collection Division Micah Rose, Financial Analyst Sarina Carrizosa, Finance Department Thomas Hunter, Public Works Timothy Amiot, Public Works Electric Operations Division William Bloor, Legal Climate Action Planning Group Barb Maynes Benji Astrachan Bill Atkinson Bill Baccus Brian Phillips Bob Vreeland Bruce Pape Carol Scholl Christeal Milburn Cindy Jayne David Clark David Mattern Duane Morris Ed Chadd Elliot Bays Erin Shield Ian Miller Ian Nickel Janet Marx Jesse Waknitz Justin Plavet Justin Vendettuoli Karen Weaver Kenton Hotsko Mark Ozias II Mel Messineo Melissa Williams Michael Clemens Miguel Reabold Mike Doherty Mindy Gelder Nina Sarmiento Noah Glaude Pamela Hastings Pam Wilder Pat Milliren Pat Nachreiner Rich Meier Robert Knapp Ryan Qualls Sharah Truett Sissi Bruch Tim Abbe Tony Billera Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN THANK YOU MAY 6 , 2022 | 3 City Council Kate Dexter, Mayor Navarra Carr,* Deputy Mayor Brenda Mayer, Council Member Charlie McCaughan, Council Member LaTrisha Suggs,* Council Member Lindsey Schromen-Wawrin,* Council Member Mike French, Council Member *Denotes participation in the Climate Change Subcommittee Group. Planning Commission Andrew Schwab, Chair Ben Stanley,* Vice-Chair Colin Young,* Position 5 Marolee Smith, Position 1 Richie Ahuja,* Position 6 Steve Luxton, Position 7 Steven Switzer, Position 4 Tammy Dziadek, Position 4 *Denotes participation in the Climate Action Planning Group. Tribal Government Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe Other Stakeholders and Community Groups Black Ball Ferry Line Clallam County Clallam County Marine Resources Committee Clallam PUD Clallam Transit North Olympic Land Trust Olympic Climate Action Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Olympic National Park & Forest Port of Port Angeles Strait Ecosystem Recovery Network Consultant Team P.J. Tillmann, Cascadia Consulting Group Mike Chang, Cascadia Consulting Group Tristan Smit, Cascadia Consulting Group Mary Ann Rozance, Cascadia Consulting Group Megan Lee, Cascadia Consulting Group Kristina Zeynalova, Cascadia Consulting Group Julie Stein, Cascadia Consulting Group Andrea MacClellan, Herrera Environmental Consultants Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN THANK YOU MAY 6 , 2022 | 4 Table of Contents Welcome ____________________________________________________________________________ 1 Thank You ___________________________________________________________________________ 2 Our Resiliency Plan, at a Glance __________________________________________________________ 5 Why We’re Taking Action _______________________________________________________________ 7 Plan Development Process ________________________________________________________________ 8 Our Carbon Footprint __________________________________________________________________ 9 Our Resiliency Solutions _______________________________________________________________ 12 How to Read the Strategies and Actions _____________________________________________________ 13 Community Resilience & Wellbeing ________________________________________________________ 15 Ecosystem Health ______________________________________________________________________ 23 Transportation _________________________________________________________________________ 30 Buildings & Energy ______________________________________________________________________ 35 Consumption & Waste __________________________________________________________________ 40 Getting Started ______________________________________________________________________ 45 Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY PLAN, AT A GLANCE MAY 6 , 2022 | 5 Our Resiliency Plan, at a Glance The Port Angeles community has long prided itself on embracing a self-sufficient way of life. To continue to rely on ourselves and protect our residents, economy, and infrastructure, we must now plan for our current and future resiliency. With the development and implementation of the Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan (Resiliency Plan or Plan), the City of Port Angeles (the City) and its residents will seize the opportunity to strengthen our communities for ourselves today and for future generations. Guided by principles of social, economic, and environmental sustainability, the Resiliency Plan will move us toward our collective vision of community resilience and carbon neutrality by preparing and reinforcing our energy grid, strengthening our local economy, creating a clean and accessible transportation system, and ensuring a healthy environment for all. We created the Resiliency Plan as a direct response to the 2016 Comprehensive Plan Update, which included myriad climate- and resilience-related goals and policies. As such, we designed the Resiliency Plan to build upon existing sustainability programs and efforts, and will adopt the Plan as part of the 2022 Comprehensive Plan Amendment. The Plan will also increase opportunities for synergies across the region by complementing the work of our North Olympic Peninsula neighbors and partners. The City will lead coordination and implementation for most of the actions proposed in this Plan, and as such, will prioritize an assessment of capacity and funding needs as an early action in the Plan implementation process, starting in 2022. We developed the Resiliency Plan in partnership with the community Climate Action Planning Group, an ad-hoc volunteer group who since 2019 have provided recommendations to increase resiliency in Port Angeles and strongly shaped the vision, priorities, strategies, and actions in the Plan. We also engaged 43 members of the broader public and over a dozen City staff to further develop and refine the work of the CAPG and City team. The word cloud illustrates community responses around their vision for Port Angeles in 2030. Intended to serve as a strategic roadmap to achieve our vision for Port Angeles, the Plan has two overall objectives:  Build community resilience and help better prepare us to face climate impacts and natural disasters.  Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from local sectors and activities. We will prioritize near- and mid-term actions that help us better prepare for climate risks now and in the future, put us on a pathway to carbon neutrality by 2030, and provide a foundation for long-range sustainability policy. To that end, the Plan is laid out across five key sectors that both reflect community priorities and address the largest sources of community greenhouse gas emissions, as shown on the following page. Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY PLAN, AT A GLANCE MAY 6 , 2022 | 6 Resilience is the ability to withstand or bounce back from stressors such as climate change, natural disasters, and health crises. Resilience building actions address the impacts of climate change. Greenhouse gases that trap heat in the atmosphere and cause climate change, including carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) nitrous oxide (N2O), and fluorinated gases. Emissions reduction actions address the cause of climate change: Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN WHY WE’RE TAKING ACTION MAY 6 , 2022 | 7 Why We’re Taking Action A critical goal of the Resiliency Plan is to bolster our community’s self-reliance at the local scale and protect our natural resources, while lowering our cost of living. Our Resiliency Plan considers the overall quality of life and health of the community holistically, while promoting tangible benefits for the broad community. This Plan is an opportunity for the City to join the community in leading the coordination and implementation of local climate action. In partnership with the community, we’ve developed a cohesive, forward-looking, science- based Plan that draws upon lessons learned from previous and ongoing sustainability efforts, including the work of the Clime Action Planning Group, and helps Port Angeles meet or exceed state and federal standards.1 However, building resilience to climate change impacts and doing our part to reduce local greenhouse emissions will take more than just local and regional planning and policy. While the City will need to build capacity and lead implementation of both the city and community actions in this Plan, our success will depend on continued collaboration and buy-in from all members of our community—residents, workers, and business owners alike. The following are a few sustainable practices that residents, workers, and business owners can adopt today to do their part to achieve our collective vision for a resilient and self-reliant Port Angeles. 1 Key state and federal standards include federal fuel efficiency standards and several state policies: the Climate Commitment Act, which places an economy-wide cap on carbon, requires a 45% reduction in emissions by 2030, and requires a 95% reduction in emissions and net-zero by 2050 (consistent with best available science); the Clean Energy Transportation Act (CETA), which requires Washington’s electric utilities to be 100% carbon-free by 2045; the Clean Buildings Performance Standard, which requires large commercial and multi-family buildings to reduce their energy use intensity 15% and provide EV charging capability on-site at new buildings; the state building code which requires a 70% reduction in annual net energy consumption for new construction; the Clean Fuel Standard, which requires a 20% reduction in the carbon intensity of fuels by 2038; HB 1287 requiring EV charging capability for new single-family construction by 2024. Key state and federal standards include federal fuel efficiency standards and Clean Energy Transportation Act (CETA), which requires Washington’s electric utilities to eliminate carbon emissions from their energy resources by 2045. Benefits of Action Implementing the strategies and actions in this Plan will provide local green jobs, support affordable housing and fair development, improve public transit and walkability, prioritize renewable energy and long- term energy cost savings, bolster public health and emergency management services, and support healthy natural systems. Implementation will also avoid damages to the City and community from greenhouse gas emissions (this is known as the social cost of carbon). Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN WHY WE’RE TAKING ACTION MAY 6 , 2022 | 8 PLAN DEVELOPMENT PROCESS Building on the Climate Action Planning Group’s prior work and recommendations, we sought to develop a plan that prioritizes ambitious resiliency actions that prepare the community and City for climate change impacts like extreme heat, sea level rise, and increased flooding and reduce Port Angeles’ greenhouse gas emissions. To identify data-driven goals, strategies, and actions, we drew on best available science and greenhouse gas inventory results. We also worked collaboratively with the Climate Action Planning Group to create an equitable and inclusive community engagement process that offered multiple opportunities to gather input from our community, City Council, and the Planning Commission at each step of plan development. Our multi-step plan development approach (depicted below) resulted in a Plan that reflects the unique priorities and values of our community, prioritizes tangible and impactful resilience actions, and increases the community and stakeholder buy-in that is critical for ensuring successful long--term implementation of the Resiliency Plan. Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR CARBON FOOTPRINT MAY 6 , 2022 | 9 Our Carbon Footprint When we burn fossil fuels for transportation and energy needs, use refrigerators and air conditioners, and when our solid waste decomposes, we increase greenhouse gas emissions in our atmosphere. These gases warm the planet as they trap heat in our atmosphere, resulting in measurable shifts in global and local climate patterns. The chart presents Port Angeles’ communitywide greenhouse gas emissions in 2019, with transportation accounting for the largest sources of emissions. Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR CARBON FOOTPRINT MAY 6 , 2022 | 10 At 1,581 MTCO2e, City operations produced just 1% of communitywide emissions. However, City leadership in emissions reduction—and the capacity to implement resiliency actions—helps drive support for communitywide action. The chart below shows the largest sources of emissions from municipal operations by sector. Vehicle Fleet 57% Water & Wastewa ter Treatmen t Facilitie… Buildings & Facilities… Solid Waste … Street Lights & Traffic Signals <1% Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR CARBON FOOTPRINT MAY 6 , 2022 | 11 Across all sectors, we view our carbon footprint as a new metric to measure community resiliency. A declining footprint will indicate an increased ability to provide basic needs, goods, services, and an overall high quality of life to the Port Angeles community and the ecosystems on which the community depends, even as the climate changes and other stressors become more visible. An increasing footprint will make it harder to provide those same goods and services and sustain an overall high quality of life. Port Angeles communities and the broader North Olympic Peninsula are increasingly experiencing the economic, health, and ecosystem impacts of sea-level rise, declines in snowpack, prolonged heatwaves, and destructive flooding events. With 26 miles of marine coastline and 17 miles of streams, we are particularly vulnerable to the combined impacts of sea level rise, storm surge, and coastal erosion, which threaten homes and businesses, roads and other critical infrastructure, and critical habitat for local species. To ensure Port Angeles can effectively prepare for and bounce back from these climate impacts, we intentionally focus the Resiliency Plan on pursuing climate resilience opportunities that the community identified as high priorities – Community Resilience and Wellbeing, Ecosystem Health, and Transportation. At the same time, the Plan also identifies actions that reduce emissions and build resilience across all sectors. PLACEHOLDER FOR IMAGES SHOWING SEA-LEVEL RISE AND OTHER COASTAL CLIMATE IMPACTS. WHICH IMPACTS ARE FEATURED WILL DEPEND ON PHOTOS THE CITY HAS AVAILABLE. • Accelerated bluff recession and coastal bluff erosion o Show west of Ediz Hook (e.g., land fill, new sea wall) o Show threatened Residential homes o Show threatened roads and structures. • Failing and/or overtopping of shoreline armor o Show inundation of Olympic Discovery Trail • Bank channel erosion and vegetation changes o Show salt wedge extending farther upstream along coastal streams • Inundated stormwater infrastructure o Show Hill Street/Marine Drive system in west Port Angeles is inundated at high water. • Inundated low-lying downtown areas, o Show downtown flooding, adjacent to stream mouths Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 12 Our Resiliency Solutions The strategies and actions in this Plan were developed and refined iteratively over the course of the Plan development process. We identified an initial action list using existing City plans and comparable regional plans, previous work from the Climate Action Planning Group, emerging best practices on climate action, and community feedback. Of the approximately 70 initial actions, we evaluated 40 actions using a qualitative multi- criteria analysis —a scoring system which ranks actions against a set of evaluation criteria (presented in the table below). The Climate Action Planning Group and the City carefully selected and vetted the criteria and their weights to align with community priorities around building resiliency. Multi-Criteria Analysis Approach The multi-criteria analysis process was designed to assess a representative set of priority actions as well as actions that may be controversial or need additional refinement. This means that some of the most promising actions were excluded from the multi-criteria analysis, because we were confident they would be included in the Plan. It also means that less promising actions (e.g., less impactful, more controversial) were included in the multi-criteria analysis, to gather more data on whether they were appropriate for Port Angeles to pursue. Therefore, whether or not an action was evaluated with the multi-criteria analysis is not an indicator of its overall level of priority, impact, or importance—all actions in the Plan are recommended for implementation. We used a three-step process to complete the multi-criteria analysis: 1. Determine criteria, criteria definitions, and criteria weights: Based on professional experience and City and community priorities, the project team proposed criteria and criteria definitions to evaluate the benefits and costs of proposed actions. The Climate Action Planning Group and the City reviewed and approved the criteria and definitions, with changes to clarify how actions would be evaluated. The Climate Action Planning Group also completed a survey to determine criteria weights; City staff reviewed the proposed weights and the project team made final adjustments to reflect community and City values and priorities through the criteria weights. 2. Conduct analysis and quality control: Two project team evaluators independently reviewed and scored criteria for the same 25 actions, a third evaluator reviewed and scored another 15 actions, and City staff reviewed and scored three additional actions using a 1 (low) to 5 (high) scale. Each evaluator documented a brief rationale for each score based on clear criteria definitions and professional judgement drawing from available literature, peer city case studies, knowledge of City context, engagement results, and individual expertise and experience. A fourth evaluator from the project team mediated a review session to address any discrepancies in scoring between the independent evaluations to arrive at a consensus score. 3. Determine priority “short list” of actions: We used the multi-criteria analysis results, as well as input from the Climate Action Planning Group and a public workshop, to determine which actions (of the total list of 70 actions) to include in the Plan. In total, 55 actions Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 13 were recommended and are included in this Plan. The City will develop a separate Implementation Plan to determine the implementation timeline, funding mechanisms, responsible parties, and key partners. HOW TO READ THE STRATEGIES AND ACTIONS [snip of first page of a focus area, with the following terms defined as call-outs] • Overall Goal: What the focus area is working toward • City Goals: Interim and final targets to track City progress • Community Goals: Interim and final targets to track community progress • Indicators: What will be measured to track progress • Strategy Name: The key ways the City and community will work toward the Overall Goal • Action Short Name: How the City and community will work toward the Overall Goal and Strategy Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 14 We use the following system to report the results of the multi-criteria analysis, categorize actions that we did not evaluate with the multi-criteria analysis, and indicate which actions to consider integrating in the next Comprehensive Plan update. MULTI -CRITERIA ANALYSIS RESULTS REPORTING Criteria Weight Definition GHG 25% Impact - The scope and likelihood that the action will reduce greenhouse gas emissions or enhance resiliency. RES EQ 20% Equity - How the action impacts vulnerability across different populations and addresses historitc inequalities; how fairly benefits and costs are distributed across the community. AF 20% Affordability - The affordability for the community and City; the costs of inaction. FE 15% Feasibility - Regulatory, political, or technological constraints related to action implementation as well as the City’s level of control over implementation. SU 10% Community Support - Stakeholder, partner, and resident support. CB 10% Co-benefits - Secondary support for public health, green economy, and healthy natural systems. Action Performance = Low = Low-Medium = Medium = Medium-High = High Categorization of Actions Strong resilience building action Strong greenhouse gas emissions reduction action Supportive action that helps ensure success of other actions and/or has low resilience-building or emissions reductions Comprehensive Plan Alignment Consider for integration in the Comprehensive Plan (look for CP and this icon) Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 15 COMMUNITY RESILIENCE & WELLBEING Port Angeles’ communities will be better prepared to adapt and respond to climate change impacts. Goals  Every Port Angeles resident has a safe and affordable place to live.  Prioritize business support through enhancement of our commercial districts: Adopt and identify city actions to make downtown walkable, clean, safe, and vibrant. Prioritize multiple commercial centers while maintaining the multimodal needs of people and commerce.  Build capacity of the city to better meet the community’s needs, invest in improvements, focus on improving economic outcomes, and maintain what we have.  Recover from the COVID-19 pandemic in a way that emphasizes partnerships, innovation, and growth as tools to meet the community’s needs.  Prioritize focus on high-performing relationships and partnerships so that the entire city will better achieve these goals while increasing trust and cohesion for City Council, stakeholders, and the broader community. Indicators  Average Housing and Utility Cost  Residents are more financially secure  Established land use plan and policies to meet housing needs for all demographics over next 20 years.  % of population that can be accommodated in community safety hubs or other disaster relief centers  Regional focus on success of local business.  Infrastructure and policies that allow for multiple commercial centers to succeed.  Air quality  Drinking water quality  # of Community Paramedic contacts that have successful referral to services  # of REdisCOVERY contacts that have successful referral to services  Stabilize revenue.  Capital facilities backlog reduced.  We have moved from planning to action.  We are all focused on (achieving) the plan.  Partners (i.e. business, nonprofit, tribal, advisory committees, residents, other governments) are at the table.  We move at the speed of trust.  Everyone is focused on strong relationships and partnerships.  Community sees Port Angeles as a respectful team player. Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 16 Strategy CRW-1. Increase community capacity to respond to future climate change. Actions CP Investments & Benefits Impact 1. City price on carbon EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB 2. Local food security EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB 3. County-City coordination (not evaluated with multi-criteria analysis) EQ SU AF FE CB 4. Climate migration preparation EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB 5. Water supply monitoring & enhancement EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB 6. Sea level rise vulnerability assessment of City assets EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB 7. Community Rating System (not evaluated with multi-criteria analysis) EQ SU AF FE CB 8. City asset vulnerability tool EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 17 9. Comprehensive climate outreach & education EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB 10. Comprehensive Plan priorities (not evaluated with multi-criteria analysis) EQ SU AF FE CB 11. Housing Action Plan implementation EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB 12. Hazard Mitigation Plan implementation EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB Strategy CRW-2. Prepare Port Angeles for future extreme events. Actions CP Investments & Benefits Impact 13. Wildland urban interface EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB 14. Climate resilience & emergency planning EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 18 Strategy CRW-1. Increase community capacity to respond to future climate change. # Action Short Name Action Description CP* Action Evaluation 1 City price on carbon Assess the role of carbon pricing in driving equity and resilience outcomes. Build explicit price of carbon in city procurement decisions. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 2.8 2 Local food security Make Port Angeles food secure by promoting sustainable agriculture and multiple sources for food procurement. This may include: - Partner with North Olympic Development Council to designate funding to promote and establish urban sustainable agriculture/food forests. - Encourage partnerships between local farms/farmers and residents to establish local food production projects. - Work with the Community and Economic Development Department and Engineering Department to develop policies that foster agreement and resource availability systems for allowing gardening for food, habitat, or both in the right-of-way (e.g., planting strips) and explore irrigation incentives. - Leverage existing zoning regulations that encourage land use overlays for food production. - Explore the feasibility of water utility pricing incentives and grey water to conserve and reuse water. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.4 3 County-City coordination Coordinate and partner with Clallam County, Tribal partners, and Olympic Medical Center to implement regional climate resilience policies. Review the County-Wide Planning Process agreement for its climate preparedness. 4 Climate migration preparation Assess climate migration impacts with forecasting every 5 years. Integrate those findings into the Comprehensive Plan, infrastructure plans, revenue forecasting, and housing assessments. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.8 Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 19 5 Water supply monitoring & enhancement Work with county and state partners to identify monitoring needs and enhance water supply monitoring (e.g., improve forecasting for future water supply and demand under climate change, study ways to enhance water storage and groundwater aquifer recharge in the city). This includes developing and implementing a local groundwater strategy that includes study of the local aquifer and actions to address groundwater issues near bluffs. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.5 6 Sea level rise vulnerability assessment of City assets Conduct a sea level rise evaluation in conjunction with Clallam County and the North Olympic Development Council to evaluate the vulnerability of City assets including roads (motorized & non-motorized), other infrastructure (sewage treatment, water, buildings), and marine access. This includes: - Reference the City Emergency Mitigation Plan to identify vulnerable infrastructure. - Analyze sewer system capacity and vulnerability to sea level rise and identify actions to increase resilience. - Evaluate roads and structures along bluff crests for erosion threat with sea level rise for planned retreat and ecosystem restoration; minimize realignment and protection. - Identify areas for action through the Capital Facilities Plan. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.5 7 Community Rating System Participate in the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA’s) Community Rating System. 8 City asset vulnerability tool Create tool to evaluate vulnerability of City assets, projects, and activities. Incorporate tool into City workflow (e.g., permits and expenditures), updates of the Hazard Mitigation Plan, and Capital Facilities Plan. Include training for City staff, Council, and committees in the use of the tool. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.3 9 Comprehensive climate outreach & education Develop comprehensive climate outreach & education programs. The City will partner with North Olympic Development Council to leverage resources for technical and expert advice plus outreach and education. To build additional capacity, the City will also make a budget request for a full-time resiliency plan coordination (see Getting Started). Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.6 Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 20 Outreach and education may include: - Renewable energy tours: Create a "renewable energy" or "energy efficiency" home tour, like a neighborhood garden tour or Master Gardener program, for neighbors to learn from each other on how to implement renewable energy or energy efficient upgrades in their homes. - Host community conversations in climate vulnerable locations to educate and train community on how to adapt to those climate impacts. - Involve high school students in climate work and developing a yearly “Climate Action Report Card." - Partner with environmental education organizations such as AmeriCorps or the County Health Department on major climate-related events to raise awareness and increase adoption of climate-friendly activities, beginning with a Climate Week and food waste reduction competition. - Create a Climate Change Week to designate a week each year for City and community evaluation of the progress made on meeting community commitments and goals relating to reducing our contribution and vulnerability to climate change. - Create a food waste reduction competition led by the City: Ask restaurants to be creative in how to reduce food waste and encourage neighborhoods to take climate action (e.g., calculate how far your food traveled). - Develop local demonstration projects and highlight local business' sustainability initiatives. 10 Comprehensive Plan priorities Use the Resiliency Plan to inform Comprehensive Plan updates: - Include a climate change resilience element in the Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan. - Develop policy in the comprehensive plan that sites infrastructure outside of current and future hazard areas. - Meet HB 1099 requirements (granted it passes in 2022 legislative session). 11 Housing Action Plan implementation Implement key provisions of the Port Angeles Housing Action Plan. This includes: - Provide additional (height) floor and increased site coverage for mixed-use Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 4.0 Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 21 projects that provide on or off-site affordable housing units within appropriate land use districts and overlays such as the Planned Residential Development, Planned Low Impact Development, Mixed Commercial Overlay, and Infill Overlay Zone. - Model accessory dwelling unit plans to build accessible housing. - Pilot a City-led project on affordable housing. 12 Hazard Mitigation Plan implementation Implement key provisions of the 2019 Hazard Mitigation Plan: - Promote FireWise building design for construction in the Vision Master Plan and Housing Programs. - Develop alternate water supplies to provide reserve water sources to be used in event of drought or water shortage. - Develop advanced warning systems. - Identify elders and other vulnerable populations to prioritize for mitigation and disaster assistance. - Develop and/or improve Emergency Plans such as Evacuation Plans, Tribal Records Protection Plan, Continuity of Operations Plan, etc. - Update flood assessment. - Create and expand water efficiency/conservation programs. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.3 *An icon indicates the action will be considered for integration in the next Comprehensive Plan update. Strategy CRW-2. Prepare Port Angeles for future extreme events. # Action Short Name Action Description CP* Action Evaluation 13 Wildland urban interface Provide education and incentives for new construction and incentivize existing buildings to install venting and other features that resist ember wash ignition. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.4 14 Climate resilience & emergency planning Continue to collaborate with emergency planning partners to: - Integrate climate considerations into emergency and hazard mitigation planning. - Implement city-wide emergency planning exercises and education (i.e., Map Your Neighborhood) to build community resilience during emergency Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.7 Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 22 events. - Create climate resiliency hubs at key locations (e.g., library) to support residents during extreme events such as flooding or heat waves. *An icon indicates the action will be considered for integration in the next Comprehensive Plan update. Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 23 ECOSYSTEM HEALTH Port Angeles’ ecosystems will sustain fish, wildlife, and people, with the ability to bounce back from stressors. Goals  Publicly recognize the many values provided by trees in an urban setting and identify opportunities to plant trees.  Plant trees along residential streets, in parking lots, and in other areas as opportunities arise. Trees should be retained whenever possible and maintained using Best Management Practices as appropriate for each tree type.  Work in partnership with the community as stewards of the area’s unique environment and quality of life.  Consider the policies adopted in the Water Resources Inventory Area 18 Watershed Management Plan, including the provision of water supply to the urban areas in and between the Elwha River and Morse Creek drainage basins.  Protect air and water quality by minimizing pollution from new and existing sources including climatic change impacts.  To preserve and enhance the City's shoreline, its natural vegetation and wildlife and to mitigate for present and planned impacts in a manner consistent with the State Shoreline Management Act and the City's Shoreline Master Program. Indicators  % tree canopy  % within one-third mile of park, trail, or green space  Net carbon stored (MT CO2e)  pH of Port Angeles Harbor and nearby marine waters Strategy EH-1. Increase opportunities for carbon sequestration and storage. Actions CP Investments & Benefits Impact 15. Forest and marine habitat preservation EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 24 Strategy EH-2. Restore and protect shoreline, aquatic, and forest habitat. Actions CP Investments & Benefits Impact 16. Urban tree canopy, parks, and open space EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB 17. Native plant landscaping EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB 18. Climate sensitive tree species (not evaluated with multi-criteria analysis) EQ SU AF FE CB 19. Critical area protection EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB 20. Coastal erosion reduction EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB 21. Shoreline Master Program updates EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB 22. Submerged habitat monitoring (not evaluated with multi-criteria analysis) EQ SU AF FE CB 23. Salmon habitat protection EQ SU RES AF FE GHG Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 25 CB 24. Land-based pollutant reduction (not evaluated with multi-criteria analysis) EQ SU AF FE CB 25. Culvert replacement (not evaluated with multi-criteria analysis) EQ SU AF FE CB 26. Capital Facilities Plan implementation (not evaluated with multi-criteria analysis) EQ SU AF FE CB Strategy EH-3. Address sea level rise. Actions CP Investments & Benefits Impact 27. Resilience of clean-up sites (not evaluated with multi-criteria analysis) EQ SU AF FE CB 28. Cost-benefit analysis of shoreline armor repair (not evaluated with multi-criteria analysis) EQ SU AF FE CB 29. Boat launch repair (not evaluated with multi-criteria analysis) EQ SU AF FE CB Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 26 Strategy EH-1. Increase opportunities for carbon sequestration and storage. # Action Short Name Action Description CP* Action Evaluation 15 Forest and marine habitat preservation Partner with organizations and individuals (e.g., National Marine Sanctuary, Olympic National Park Service/National Forest, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association, Puget Sound Partnership, Washington Department of Natural Resources, Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife, Feiro Marine Life Center, and private timber landholders) and the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe to preserve forest and marine habitats, developing new strategies where needed. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.9 *An icon indicates the action will be considered for integration in the next Comprehensive Plan update. Strategy EH-2. Restore and protect shoreline, aquatic, and forest habitat. # Action Short Name Action Description CP* Action Evaluation 16 Urban tree canopy, parks, and open space Protect urban tree canopy, parks, and open space. This may include: - Develop a tree protection ordinance that emphasizes older trees. - Incentivize urban tree planting, especially in public areas (e.g., street planting strips). Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.6 17 Native plant landscaping Incentivize use of native plants landscaping in residential, commercial, and industrial settings within the City (e.g. partner with the County, Clallam Conservation District, and Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe's Natural Resources Department). Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 2.7 18 Climate sensitive tree species Consult with tree experts to utilize climate sensitive (adaptable) tree and native species in riparian buffers. 19 Critical area protection Add climate impact overlays to existing “Critical Areas”. Create critical area flood mapping beyond Federal Emergency Management Agency ’s (FEMA’s ) historical flood data to inform future development and support prohibition of permanent infrastructure in those areas. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.2 Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 27 20 Coastal erosion reduction Encourage soft armoring of shorelines to protect infrastructure and habitat, particularly along Ediz Hook. Implement native vegetation and other natural resource management practices to reduce landslides and coastal erosion. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.4 21 Shoreline Master Program updates Incorporate climate change more explicitly into the Shoreline Master Program. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.3 22 Submerged habitat monitoring Work with Washington Department of Natural Resources and the Clallam County Marine Resources Committee to complete a survey of sensitive submerged habitats and the species that utilize them and monitor them for change. 23 Salmon habitat protection Work with local ecological restoration partners (e.g., Clallam County Streamkeepers) to monitor and analyze climate change impact at salmon stream restoration sites and 6 creeks in the City. Use the Habitat Recovery Pilot Program to support restoration efforts. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.0 24 Land-based pollutant reduction Reduce land-based pollutants that enhance acidification in marine waters. 25 Culvert replacement Replace undersized culverts to anticipate climate influenced run-off events and renovate outdated culverts to support fish populations. 26 Capital Facilities Plan implementation Implement key provisions of the 2022-2027 Preliminary Capital Facilities Plan Transportation Improvement Plan. This includes: - H Street stormwater outfall: Identify an alternative alignment for failing pipe between Marine Drive and reduce flooding near Crown Park neighborhood. Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 28 - N Street Outfall: Improve the N Street Outfall to minimize future localized erosion and allow for monitoring and maintenance. - Francis St Outfall Repair: Repair the Francis Street Outfall. The culvert is currently buried in beach sediment and should be a pipe on the riprap bank with a dissipater. - Valley Creek Culvert & Outfall: Raise the Valley Creek Culvert & Outfall. Currently, sediment repeatedly fills the culvert, reducing capacity. - Wastewater Pump Station 3 Upgrade between Marine Drive and Hill Street. - Daylight Valley and Tumwater Creeks. *An icon indicates the action will be considered for integration in the next Comprehensive Plan update. Strategy EH-3. Address sea level rise. # Action Short Name Action Description CP* Action Evaluation 27 Resilience of clean-up sites Evaluate and address sea level rise in local clean-up sites. This includes: - Rayonier Mill: Evaluate the Rayonier Mill contamination remediation site and settling pond for sea level rise resilience. Reduce any vulnerabilities found from the evaluation. - Western Port Angeles Harbor: Address sea level rise in Clean-up Actions - K Ply properties: Clean-up plans for K Ply properties should address sea level rise. - Marine Drive: Clean-up plans should address sea level rise. - Marine Trades Area: Clean-up should address sea level rise. - Assess Capital Facilities Plan project on: (1) how it modifies greenhouse gas emissions or sequestration? (2) how it helps us adapt to increased natural hazards (coastal flooding, winter freezes, summer heat, wildfire, drought)? And (3) how it contributes to a resilient low-energy-use urban landscape? 28 Cost-benefit analysis of Conduct cost-benefit analysis of shoreline armor repairs along Olympic Discovery Trail, Hill Street West, and both sides of Ediz Hook. Address concerns of Native American burial remains on the shoreline. Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 29 shoreline armor repair 29 Boat launch repair Repair the boat launch at Ediz Hook, incorporating sea level rise and coastal storm projections to ensure resilience to future conditions. *An icon indicates the action will be considered for integration in the next Comprehensive Plan update. Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 30 TRANSPORTATION Port Angeles’ transportation systems will be clean, efficient, safe, and accessible for the community. Goals  To improve circulation patterns across and within the community, and to achieve the desired urban design of the City.  Encourage development of low-carbon-impact transportation infrastructure.  Consider converting alley ways into attractive pedestrian zones for access to local businesses.  Improve trails, sidewalks, streets, and public facilities to encourage walkability and non-motorized transportation.  Work with public and private transportation providers to provide greater access and opportunities to residents, including Sunday and holiday service. Indicators  Continuity of transit services on Sundays and holidays  % vulnerable communities with quality transit access  # miles pedestrian/bicycle infrastructure  # pedestrian/bicycle-related traffic incidents  Vehicle miles traveled  % of passenger vehicles that are electric Strategy T-1. Decrease transportation related greenhouse gas emissions. Actions CP Investments & Benefits Impact 30. Transit infrastructure, equity, & safety EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB 31. Increase electric vehicle use for general public EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 31 32. Biking and walking infrastructure EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB 33. Municipal fleet electrification & idle reduction EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB 34. Regional transport electrification (not evaluated with multi-criteria analysis) EQ SU AF FE CB 35. Port electrification (not evaluated with multi-criteria analysis) EQ SU AF FE CB 36. City employee commute emissions (not evaluated with multi-criteria analysis) EQ SU AF FE CB 37. Medium- and heavy-duty vehicle decarbonization (not evaluated with multi-criteria analysis) EQ SU AF FE CB Strategy T-2. Enhance transportation resiliency by promoting public transit and active transportation. Actions CP Investments & Benefits Impact 38. Transportation vulnerability EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 32 Strategy T-1. Decrease transportation related greenhouse gas emissions. # Action Short Name Action Description CP* Action Evaluation 30 Transit infrastructure, equity, & safety Support Clallam Transit in expanding public transit infrastructure and services to ensure access to buses is available at all times and decrease the need for travel in single-occupancy vehicles. This includes: - Develop strategies that promote transit equity and community safety by considering the most vulnerable, then design and implement transit to support pedestrians, bicycles, mass transit and individual cars, in that order. - Increase use of the park and ride system. - Implement fare-free transit within Port Angeles city limits. - Explore a high-occupancy vehicle lane on Highway 101 between Carlsborg and the Port Angeles Urban Growth Area. - Explore the feasibility of adding a high-speed electric or hybrid passenger ferry to Seattle. - Reference Clallam Transit ’s Comprehensive Operational Analysis for implementation. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.7 31 Increased electric vehicle use for general public Work with Peninsula Regional Transportation Planning Organization to develop strategies and expand infrastructure to increase use of electric vehicles. This includes: - Develop and implement an electric vehicle infrastructure plan. - Identify top barriers to electric vehicle adoption and develop plan to address them. - Explore changes to code to incentivize or require electric vehicle charging in municipal facilities and some land use zones (in exceedance of current state law). Investigate feasibility and impact of tying EV charging equipment to the community renewable energy grid (action #45) and/or City Light Operations to support networked clean power generation and storage. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.6 32 Biking and walking infrastructure Develop and expand infrastructure to support biking, walking, and e- mobility (e.g., scooters), including walkability and bikeability across highways, busy interchanges, and other busy streets (e.g., Blyn). Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.4 Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 33 33 Municipal fleet electrification & idle reduction Support and incentivize electrification and lower emissions of transportation in the City: - Create incentives to move City transportation fleet toward electrification in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve local air quality (e.g., reduce local car tabs for electric vehicles and develop electrical charging stations around the City). - Where vehicle electrification is technically infeasible, consider replacement with alternative low- and zero -carbon vehicles (e.g., clean hydrogen). - Establish a reduced idling policy for all government vehicles and offer incentives for drivers to reduce idling times. Provide fleet operators with education on the benefits of reduced idling. - Incentivize carpooling and trip reduction. - Identify municipal operations that could be accomplished without a vehicle or with a less carbon-intense fuel source (e.g., e-scooter or take transit for meter readers). Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.4 34 Regional transport electrification Encourage County, School District, National Park, private sector (e.g., delivery), mass transit on Hurricane Ridge Road, and others to move towards electric fleets. 35 Port electrification Incentivize the electrification of the city’s Port infrastructure and allow marine electrification (plugs on docks for idling ships). 36 City employee commute emissions Implement a vehicle trip reduction policy incorporating teleconferencing/ telecommuting and alternative work schedules where practical. Establish video and/or web conferencing abilities in all major City and County facilities. Consider incentivizing teleworking, providing free bus passes for City employees, and offering City employees 0% or low interest loans to purchase electric or hybrid cars/e-bikes/bikes. Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 34 37 Medium- and heavy-duty vehicle decarbonization Work with state and local partners (e.g., Ecology, vehicle sellers) to support implementation of the Washington Advanced Clean Trucks policy, which requires 75% of medium-duty vehicles (e.g., box trucks) and 40% of heavy- duty vehicles (e.g., semis) delivered to Washington to be zero-emission vehicles by 2035. For example, leverage alternative modes of transportation where available. *An icon indicates the action will be considered for integration in the next Comprehensive Plan update. Strategy T-2. Enhance transportation resiliency by promoting public transit and active transportation. # Action Short Name Action Description CP* Action Evaluation 38 Transportation vulnerability Expand the Washington State Department of Transportation climate vulnerability assessment to include non-state roads and other transportation systems to ensure that transportation investments are resilient to future climate impacts. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.3 *An icon indicates the action will be considered for integration in the next Comprehensive Plan update. Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 35 BUILDINGS & ENERGY Port Angeles will increase renewable energy use and energy efficiency in new and existing buildings. Goals  Consider potential environmental consequences, such as greenhouse gas emissions and carbon footprints, when encouraging new commercial developments and businesses.  Encourage the use of renewable energy in both the private and public sectors, providing all reasonable support and advocacy at the State level for regulations and incentives that encourage such installations.  Review all new development for impacts on climate change and adaptation to sea level rise.  Promote and utilize environment enhancing conservation practices. Those practices may include waste reduction, use of energy efficient and conserving materials, and energy conservation techniques and should also encourage the development and use of alternative forms of energy and transportation.  Promote the use of alternative energy, energy conservation technology, and smart energy grid.  Encourage businesses with low-carbon footprints. Indicators  # and % of overall housing units  Renewable energy consumption  Energy use per capita Strategy BE-1. Reduce building-related greenhouse gas emissions. Actions CP Investments & Benefits Impact 39. Energy efficiency retrofits EQ SU RES Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 36 AF FE GHG CB 40. Energy efficient home heating sources EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB 41. Bonneville Power Administration renewal agreement EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB 42. Electric vehicle parking requirements EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB 43. Low-impact development (not evaluated with multi-criteria analysis) EQ SU AF FE CB 44. Green incentive program (not evaluated with multi-criteria analysis) EQ SU AF FE CB Strategy BE-2. Support energy resilience by investing in renewable energy and community-scale energy projects Actions CP Investments & Benefits Impact 45. Community renewable energy grid EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB 46. Climate-smart finance policies EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 37 47. Retrofit buildings for vulnerability EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 38 Strategy BE-1. Reduce building-related greenhouse gas emissions. # Action Short Name Action Description CP* Action Evaluation 39 Energy efficiency retrofits Incentivize redevelopments to include energy efficient retrofits, such as weatherization and energy efficient appliances, while avoiding the split incentive.2 Prioritize based on conservation potential and ability to alleviate financial stress for those who are energy-burdened. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.1 40 Energy efficient home heating sources Incentivize homeowners to switch heating sources from wood-burning stoves and propane to high-efficiency electrical heaters and other less carbon intensive sources. This may include incentivizing active and passive solar building design. Leverage existing Bonneville Power Administration programs (e.g., energy efficiency incentives) and state and federal funding sources. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.2 41 Bonneville Power Administration renewal agreement Review and renegotiate Bonneville power franchise agreement, consistent with the Western Public Agency Group’s Post-2028 Concept Paper. Ensure renewable, resilient, and low-greenhouse gas emission sources that protects healthy habitat for salmon and other aquatic species. Include the option to purchase green energy from the grid and other power providers. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 2.9 42 Electric vehicle parking requirements Mandate that all multifamily housing and other types of housing have electric vehicle parking capacity. Include incentives in the code to support bicycle storage (i.e., racks) and ride share amenities. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.4 43 Low-impact development Eliminate barriers that prevent the use of low-impact development techniques and best management practices, such as vegetated roofs, permeable pavement, straw-bale homes, tiny homes, and bioretention, while maintaining safety and aesthetic quality in the building process. (e.g., 2 A “split incentive” occurs when neither landlord nor tenant is incentivized to pay for retrofits or upgrades to electrify buildings or reduce energy use, which can stand in the way of energy-efficient retrofits altogether. Often times property owners will not pay for energy-efficient equipment because they lack financial incentive to do so, even though retrofits would lower energy bills for tenants. Split incentives often result in renters—who are often low- to moderate-income—living in less efficient buildings with higher energy bills. Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 39 work with financial institutions to lower barriers to non-traditional, green building practices; incentivize owner-built projects). Provide low-impact development demonstration/education sites on city property. 44 Green incentive program Develop green incentive programs for residential and commercial development. *An icon indicates the action will be considered for integration in the next Comprehensive Plan update. Strategy BE-2. Support energy resilience by investing in renewable energy and community- scale energy projects # Action Short Name Action Description CP* Action Evaluation 45 Community renewable energy grid Invest in capital projects that develop community energy projects (e.g., local microgrids, local solar project) to ensure there is energy supply redundancy, especially when the City or neighborhoods lose power. Consider partnerships with Clallam Public Utility District and low- or zero- rate homeowner credit. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.6 46 Climate-smart finance policies Disincentivize building in high-risk areas, add filing to property record, and financially prepare for development that may still continue in high-risk areas such as stream ravines and marine bluffs (e.g., require long-term bonds). Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.3 47 Retrofit buildings for vulnerability Disincentivize development and remove existing infrastructure in the coastal nearshore (i.e., managed retreat). If not possible, retrofit infrastructure for coastal flooding and sea level rise. Consider hard shoreline protection in certain areas, such as bluff crests where infrastructure needs to be realigned and protected. This action would be informed by the sea level rise vulnerability assessment. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.5 *An icon indicates the action will be considered for integration in the next Comprehensive Plan update. Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 40 CONSUMPTION & WASTE Port Angeles will develop pathways toward sustainable consumption, zero waste, and increased recycling. Goals  Seek strategies and technologies which reduce greenhouse gas emissions by city facilities and operations. Indicators  Waste diversion rate  % food recovered  Water consumption Strategy CW-1. Reduce waste-related greenhouse gas emissions from landfills. Actions CP Investments & Benefits Impact 48. Wastewater facility emissions reduction EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB 49. Beneficial materials reuse (not evaluated with multi-criteria analysis) EQ SU AF FE CB 50. Circular Economy Action Plan (not evaluated with multi-criteria analysis) EQ SU AF FE CB Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 41 Strategy CW-2. Promote sustainable consumption, such as using less plastic and incentivizing recycling and compost. Actions CP Investments & Benefits Impact 51. Residential food waste diversion programs EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB 52. Commercial food waste diversion programs EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB 53. City and community sustainable purchasing EQ SU RES AF FE GHG CB 54. Plastic packaging reductions (not evaluated with multi-criteria analysis) EQ SU AF FE CB 55. Water consumption education/incentives (not evaluated with multi-criteria analysis) EQ SU AF FE CB Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 42 Strategy CW-1. Reduce waste-related greenhouse gas emissions from wastewater and landfills. # Action Short Name Action Description CP* Action Evaluation 48 Wastewater facility emissions reduction Evaluate wastewater facility to reduce greenhouse emissions and build resilience to climate impacts such as landslides. This includes: - Maximize the co-generation and on-site utilization of natural gas from anaerobic digesters and other methods of harnessing energy in wastewater treatment. This will reduce vulnerability to power and fuel shortages, as well as reduce emissions. - Reduce vulnerability of access routes to the treatment plant and consider identifying alternative routes should primary routes be compromised. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.7 49 Beneficial materials reuse Develop a procedure that encourages various groups and organizations to salvage, recover or reclaim materials before sent to the landfill to support a circular economy, promote reuse, and divert waste) - Donate materials to local organizations, such as Around-Again, Habitat Store, Goodwill, Serenity House Thrift Store. - Conduct a waste feasibility study to identify waste diversion rates and reuse opportunities. 50 Circular Economy Action Plan Develop a circular economy plan. Initial ideas to explore include a public- private enterprise incubator, grant, subsidy, and/or prize program to convert locally generated waste into recycled products. The recycled products could then be used in City operations as part of the sustainable purchasing policy (action #53) to help support broader use in the community *An icon indicates the action will be considered for integration in the next Comprehensive Plan update. Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 43 Strategy CW-2. Promote sustainable consumption, such as using less plastic and incentivizing recycling and compost. # Action Short Name Action Description CP* Action Evaluation 51 Residential food waste diversion programs Consistent with the County Solid Waste Management Plan, develop food waste diversion program for households such as using green waste bins for compost to eliminate landfilling of food waste that cause methane emissions. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.3 52 Commercial food waste diversion programs Consistent with the County Solid Waste Management Plan, work with the County to develop food waste diversion and composting programs for commercial businesses, such as diverting food waste to donation programs, placing compost collection bins around the city, implementing education programs to encourage proper sorting, and identifying end-use applications for compost, to reduce climate-changing gases that are emitted when organics rot in landfills. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.3 53 City and community sustainable purchasing Utilize a "Green Team" model to develop sustainable purchasing policies for the City and community. Multi-Criteria Analysis Overall Score: 3.7 54 Plastic packaging reductions Limit plastic packaging in conjunction with state and federal programs. 55 Water consumption education / incentives Reduce water consumption through education and incentive programs. For example: - Create a smart grid water use system and share data with consumers to increase conservation. - Promote and incentivize smart irrigation technologies for golf courses and parks. - Update water rates to discourage watering lawns. - Provide incentives for efficient food cultivation. Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OUR RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS MAY 6 , 2022 | 44 *An icon indicates the action will be considered for integration in the next Comprehensive Plan update. A Sustainable Purchasing Green Team A Green Team is a committee that collaborates on a climate- or sustainability-related projects. In this case, the City of Port Angeles will convene a Green Team for two purposes: to create a sustainable purchasing plan to guide City purchasing decisions and to draft policies that will promote sustainable materials in the community. Most Green Teams are made up of representatives across City departments to improve adoption of recommendations. At a minimum, Green Team members are responsible for developing the purchasing plans and considering how they will best be implemented in Port Angeles. They may also serve as lead implementers within their departments or as knowledge resources for others who lead implementation. The Green Team may involve community members as well, especially to provide input on community-wide policies. To decide what will be included in a sustainable purchasing plan, the Green Team will first understand what goods and services represent the largest climate opportunities. Then, they will determine what requirements are feasible and meet additional criteria, such as social, economic, and/or health benefits. City sustainable purchasing plans often prioritize building materials, vehicles, furniture, food, and electronics. They sometimes set requirements for City contractors to follow, and they may address end-of-life management for items the City purchases. A City sustainable purchasing plan will prepare the City to begin to implement a price on carbon (see CRW Action #1) by transitioning the City away from carbon-intensive goods and services. The specifics of how City purchasing will be impacted by a price on carbon will depend on how the City decides to structure that measure. For example, a price on carbon may raise costs on the most carbon-intensive goods and activities, acting as an incentive to find climate-friendly alternatives. Similarly, low-carbon alternatives that may have higher short-term costs could be subsidized to support their near-term adoption. Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN GETTING STARTED MAY 6 , 2022 | 45 Getting Started The Resiliency Plan is a culmination of many years’ work in Port Angeles and the surrounding North Olympic Peninsula. We are eager to sustain the momentum we generated preparing this Plan in its implementation. The City is already engaged in implementation planning with support from key partners, including the North Olympic Development Council. By end of 2022, we will have an Implementation Plan that will help guide our work and that of our partners. To ensure we are on our pathway to carbon neutrality and a resilient community, we will need to measure our progress and adjust based on what we find. Measuring resilience means measuring our ability to continue to provide for community needs, goods, and services and sustain our quality of life. We have prioritized metrics the City and community already use to track progress and will develop new metrics to monitor and evaluate our performance. The table below summarizes the indicators the City is considering and which departments will monitor them. Lead Monitoring Department Indicators Community Resilience & Wellbeing Community & Economic Development  Average Housing and Utility Cost  Residents are more financially secure  Established land use plan and policies to meet housing needs for all demographics over next 20 years.  % of population that can be accommodated in community safety hubs or other disaster relief centers  Regional focus on success of local business.  Infrastructure and policies that allow for multiple commercial centers to succeed.  Capital facilities backlog reduced.  We have moved from planning to action.  We are all focused on (achieving) the plan.  Partners (i.e. business, nonprofit, tribal, advisory committees, residents, other governments) are at the table.  We move at the speed of trust.  Everyone is focused on strong relationships and partnerships.  Community sees Port Angeles as a respectful team player. Public Works & Utilities  Air quality  Drinking water quality Fire Department  # of Community Paramedic contacts that have successful referral to services Police Department  # of REdisCOVERY contacts that have successful referral to services Finance  Stabilize revenue Ecosystem Health Parks & Recreation  % tree canopy  Net carbon stored (MT CO2e) Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN GETTING STARTED MAY 6 , 2022 | 46 Lead Monitoring Department Indicators  % within one-third mile of park, trail, or green space Public Works & Utilities  pH of Port Angeles Harbor and nearby marine waters Transportation Community & Economic Development *partner with Clallam Transit  Continuity of transit services on Sundays and holidays*  % vulnerable communities with quality transit access*  # miles pedestrian/bicycle infrastructure  # pedestrian/bicycle-related traffic incidents  Vehicle miles traveled  % of passenger vehicles that are electric Buildings & Energy Community & Economic Development  # and % of overall housing units Public Works & Utilities  Renewable energy consumption  Energy use per capita Consumption & Waste Public Works & Utilities  Waste diversion rate  % food recovered  Water consumption To facilitate alignment across ongoing City efforts, this Plan uses an icon to identify and prioritize actions that will be integrated with the Comprehensive Plan in 2023-2024. Creating cohesion between actions in this Plan and the Comprehensive Plan will help drive implementation for stand- alone climate change actions and bolster overall community resilience by elevating actions that easily integrate within existing planning efforts, initiatives, and programs. As the City and community move into the implementation phase, we also recommend the following initial implementation actions:  Formalize Climate Action Planning Group as a community advisory group to support implementation and help sustain ongoing community involvement needed for success. Look to add paid participation from community members who represent those most vulnerable to climate impacts, whether as part of Climate Action Planning Group or a separate effort.  Make budget request for a full-time position to hire a coordinator in 2023 to help support climate resilience actions that require community or volunteer capacity. The specifics of position are not yet known, however, we do know we need support in 2023 and beyond. This icon indicates the action is well-suited to integration in the next Comprehensive Plan update. Appendix A CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN GETTING STARTED MAY 6 , 2022 | 47  Identify sensible early win actions. Many actions or key building blocks of actions, such as foundational planning efforts or analyses, are achievable within 1-2 years. An early win action list should include a mix of high-impact, high-support, and foundational actions.  Begin planning and seeking funding now for major infrastructure resilience projects. While we will need time to complete foundational assessments prior to implementation, having planning and funding efforts underway for design and construction will help speed up implementation of major resilience projects. Current and ongoing projects implemented through Clallam County’s hazard mitigation planning efforts align with the following Plan actions: o CRW-1: Action 12: Hazard Mitigation Plan implementation o CRW-2: Action 13: Wildland urban interface o CRW-3: Action 14: Climate resilience & emergency planning  Determine a frequency for measuring and reporting success that works for the City. It will be important to develop a monitoring and reporting process that is thorough, efficient, and tailored for Port Angeles needs. A cumbersome reporting process can limit the work of implementing the Resiliency Plan, especially in a constrained staff capacity environment. Appendix A Date: October 19, 2021 To: City Council From: Allyson Brekke, Community and Economic Development Director Subject: Climate Action Plan Greenhouse Gas Inventory Results Background / Analysis: Background On November 17, 2020 City Council directed staff to enter into a contract with Cascadia Consulting to complete four tasks: Task 1 – Kick-Off Meeting & Project Management Task 2 – Public Outreach & Participation Plan Task 3 – Community & Municipal Greenhouse Gas Inventory Task 4 – Climate Resiliency Plan Task 3 involves the essential step in completing the Climate Action Plan process. The task completes a greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and demographic data collection and organization for use in the Climate Action Plan as a means to understand the unique GHG emissions of Port Angeles. The inventory that was performed is based on 2019 data and includes an analysis of the City’s electric, solid waste, water, and wastewater utilities; transportation statistics, fugitive emissions from sources such as refrigerants and wood stoves; and propane use. The City of Port Angeles performed the analysis using ICLEI’s ClearPath tool that was purchased in 2019. Major sources of data were derived from: • City of Port Angeles Public Works & Utilities (Energy, Solid Waste, Water & Wastewater); • Port of Port Angeles & Black Ball Ferry; • Clallam Transit; • Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT); and • U.S. Energy Information Administration Summary: The City’s Climate Action Plan is part of the City Council 2020-22 Strategic Plan and 2021 Workplan. This plan includes several tasks including the completion of a greenhouse gas inventory measuring both government and community-wide emissions. Working interdepartmentally with consultant Cascadia Consulting, Inc. and the Climate Action Volunteer group, City staff was able to complete the inventory using 2019 as a baseline year. This memo details initial findings. A full report is forthcoming and will also be presented to the City Council as an “information only” item. Funding: n/a Recommendation: Information only Appendix B Inventory Findings Along with the coordination of City staff from several Departments and Divisions, consultant Cascadia Consulting, Inc and the Climate Action Plan Group (CAPG) of volunteers were instrumental in successfully collecting, interpreting, collating, and submitting essential data for the inventory. It can’t be understated how much coordination is required for an inventory and analysis of this size, especially one that has never been performed by the City before with data that was collected without GHG emissions in mind. Attachment A provides a short slide deck in order to better visually understand the emissions mix, but the percentage mixes are provided below: COMMUNITY EMISSIONS Emission Type Sum of CO2e (MT) Percentage of Total Emissions Commercial Energy 1,580 1.2% Industrial Energy 155 0.1% Process & Fugitive Emissions 18,958 14.3% Residential Energy 2,090 1.6% Solid Waste 19,939 15.0% Transportation 89,299 67.3% Upstream Impacts of Activities 173 0.1% Water & Wastewater 403 0.3% Grand Total 13,2597 100.0% MUNICIPAL (GOVERNMENT) EMISSIONS Emission Type Sum of CO2e (MT) Percentage of Total Emissions Buildings & Facilities 143 9% Streetlights & Traffic Signals 10 1% Vehicle Fleet 895 57% Solid Waste Facilities 131 8% Water & Wastewater Treatment Facilities 402 25% Total 1,581 100% Its important to note that when looking at total emissions from both inventories, the emissions from City of Port Angeles 2019 operations equates to around 1 percent of the total emissions within Port Angeles. This inventory is the first of many that will be performed in the future in order to assess the progress of priorities and direction provided by the Climate Action Plan. On October 7th several members of City staff and a representative of Cascadia Consultant met for a debrief and offboarding discussion related to the inventory and City data availability. In order to perform the inventory more efficiently, effectively, and in a more coordinated manner, staff discussed the successes and failures of the process from their unique data-gathering perspective. An effort will be made by staff to find solutions to issues and ensure that institutional knowledge would not be the basis for the process by documenting each individual’s process. The group also discussed gaps in the data and how those gaps can be addressed and filled in future inventory efforts. In November the Cascadia will meet with staff and the CAPG to provide training and hand off work with ClearPath for future inventory efforts. Appendix B Next Steps Cascadia Consulting is currently creating a 2-5 page GHG emissions inventory report that summarizes the methodology and key findings of the community and municipal inventories that will be included in the final Climate Resiliency Plan. With the inventory complete, the Climate Action Plan process is entering into a larger Participation and Outreach process. With the assistance of Staff and Cascadia Consultants, the CAPG will begin outreach across the community in pop-up events. Cascadia met with the CAPG at the end of September to discuss the GHG inventory and strategies for outreach. The first of two workshops is scheduled for November 17 with the Planning Commission. Funding Overview: N/A Appendix B Inventory Results: 2019 Community Snapshot Transportation & Mobile Sources 68% Waste 15% Process & Fugitive Emissions 14% Energy 3% Water & Wastewater <1% Total 2019 Community Emissions: 132,597 MTCO2e Main Sources of Emissions (in order):1.Transportation & mobile sources2.Solid waste generation & landfill operations3.Process & fugitive emissions (e.g., refrigerants) Major Data Sources •City of Port Angeles Public Works & Utilities (Energy, Solid Waste, Water & Wastewater) •Port of Port Angeles & Black Ball Ferry •Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) •U.S. Energy Information Administration​ Key Considerations •Propane data downscaled from state-level usage data; scaled based on households •No commercial/industrial propane estimates available - •Vehicle mileage data was downscaled from annual county-level data from WSDOT 1 Appendix B Inventory Results: Detailed Community Findings Total 2019 Community Emissions 132,597 MTCO2e On-Road Vehicles Off-Road Vehicles Port of Port Angeles Marine Vessels Residential Energy Commercial Energy Industrial Energy Waste Process & Fuigitive Emissions Water & Wastewater Treatment Major Drivers of Emissions: •On-road cars, motorcycles, SUVs, and trucks (59%) •Solid waste generation & landfill operations (15%) •Refrigerant leakage & electricity losses (14%) Government operations make up ~1% of total emissions* *The government operations inventory is still being finalized to include results from an upcoming employee commute survey 2 Appendix B Inventory Results: Government vs. Community Emissions Total 2019 Emissions: •Community: 132,597 MTCO2e •Government Operations: 1,581 MTCO2e Emissions from government operations make up ~1% of total emissions 3 Community Emissions 99% Government Operations 1% Port Angeles Greenhouse Gas Emissions (2019) Appendix B Inventory Results: Government Operations Total 2019 Community Emissions: •1,581 MTCO2e Major Drivers of Emissions: •Gasoline vehicles (28%) •Diesel vehicles (27%) •Process emissions from wastewater treatment (13%) •Waste generated from government operations (8%) Key Considerations: •Employee commute data still in progress •Derived solid waste tonnages from bin sizes & pickup frequency Vehicle Fleet 57% Water & Wastewater Treatment Facilities 25% Buildings & Facilities 9% Solid Waste Facilities 8%Street Lights & Traffic Signals <1% 4 Appendix B Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Kick-off Meeting Agenda | January 26, 2021 | 9-11 AM Agenda •Introductions, Project Goals & Objectives •Background Information & Context Setting •Brainstorming/Questions for Engagement, GHG Inventory, and Plan Development •Project Logistics (optional) •Next Steps Indicates key discussion items Kick-off Meeting Objectives •Generate a shared understanding of what success looks like for this project, and clear roles for all team members. •The City team provides further direction on the scope and objectives of project deliverables. •Understand key project risks and identify suitable mitigations and actions for each. •Kickstart development of the community engagement strategy and data collection for the greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories. Introductions, P roject G oals & Objectives (P.J.) PROJECT T EAM City Team Members Role on Project (to be verified at kick-off) Ben Braudrick, Planning Project Manager Emma Bolin, Community & Economic Development Project Director Micah Rose, Finance Utility Data Analyst Angel Torres, Public Works City Power Systems Utility Representative Ben Stanley, Planning Commission City Planning Commission Representative Richie Ahuja, Planning Commission City Planning Commission Representative Lindsey Schromen-Wawrin, City Council City Council Representative LaTrisha Ollom-Suggs, City Council City Council Representative Appendix C Port Angeles Resiliency Plan - Kick-off Meeting January 26, 2021 | page 2 Rich Meier, Clallam County Clallam County Representative Jonathan Boehme, City Engineer City Public Works Engineering Representative Chris Cowgill, Legal City Legal Representative Bob Vreeland, City resident Volunteer Work Group Member Allyson Brekke, Community Economic Development ? Clea Rome, Washington State University Extension Clallam County Internal Climate Taskforce Leader Cascadia Team Members Role on Project P.J. Tillmann Project Manager & Strategy Selection Lead Mike Chang Engagement & Writing Lead Tristan Smit Analysis Lead Aaron Tam Project Support Andrea MacLennan (Herrera) Resiliency & Engagement Advisor Andrea Martin Strategic Advisor OVERARCHING PROJECT OBJECTIVES • Gain an understanding of Port Angeles community’s GHG emissions impact by: o Conducting communitywide and municipal GHG inventories o Preparing a GHG inventory report handout that summarizes key findings and methodology. o Preparing hand-off materials to enable the City to competently complete future inventory updates. • Perform a robust, equitable, and (virtual) public outreach process on climate change issues and impacts that builds on the work completed to date and captures community priorities and concerns for use in development of the Climate Resiliency Plan. • Guided by community engagement results, develop a targeted, accessible, and technically defensible Climate Resiliency Plan that reflects and brings together City and community priorities, carbon reduction and resilience strategies, and implementation considerations. WHAT WILL SUCCESS LOOK LIKE? Appendix C Port Angeles Resiliency Plan - Kick-off Meeting January 26, 2021 | page 3 A GHG Inventory that is: Technically sound • Includes the City and community’s major emissions sources. • Follows protocols and best practices for GHG emissions inventorying and forecasting. • Use county level data where appropriate, to be able to compare to neighboring counties. Replicable • Builds City staff capacity, both in GHG inventorying and implementing actions. • Provides a benchmarking opportunity to understand trends and compare to peer cities. Insightful • Provides insights as to what the Resiliency Plan should include. A robust, equitable, and seamless engagement process that supports a plan that is: Realistic & Attainable. • Provides clear and well-defined goals and strategies; shows where gaps exist and how progress is being made. • Is built on understanding and integrating the public’s priorities and concerns. • Provides a framework for monitoring and evaluating progress along the way and integrating into the City’s decision-making and planning processes. • Is consistent with other regional, state, and local initiatives. Public-ready • Inspires people and welcomes them in. • Maximizes community co-benefits. • Does not have significant opposition due to strong community engagement. • Builds broader community engagement around climate and sustainability initiatives. • Translates scientific literature to all audiences; avoids scientific jargon. • People-centered using an equity and resiliency lens. • Builds on existing local science, such as the North Olympic Climate Collaborative. WHAT ARE THE SOCIAL EQUITY CONSIDERATIONS? HOW DO WE CENTER THEM? • Equitable energy efficiency standards through subsidization or other policy mechanisms will help center equity. • Social equity should refer to both equity in engagement and equity in outcome. • Orient the plans and co-benefits around city priorities like housing, mobility, and local job creation. o Policies need to encourage and invite investments in local jobs. Appendix C Port Angeles Resiliency Plan - Kick-off Meeting January 26, 2021 | page 4 o Port Angeles has not pursued high-density housing, so there is a ring of high- density developments on the exterior of the city. o Folks in rural communities are more car-dependent. Transit access is needed to these areas. Many tribal members live in rural areas. • Emergency resilience like the floodplain ordinance. • Cast wide net in public engagement and be mindful of the times that meetings are scheduled so that people can easily engage. • Look at the goals and solutions of local indigenous groups, for example around reducing Salish Sea pollution and addressing sea level rise, and how we co-exist with our environment. With sea level rise solutions, there is the option of armoring, but that is detrimental to spawning habitat for fish. If we are going to value social equity, we need think carefully about how we interact with the shoreline. • Wood smoke is used as an affordable energy source, but it also generates pollution. This is something to consider in terms of equity. • Consideration of carbon pricing. • Broadband internet access for all. Background Information and Context Setting (P.J.) What does Cascadia need to know about the key plans and resources below to best support you? Relevant plans Plan Notes  General Plan/Comp Plan  Hazard Mitigation Plan  Economic Development Plan  Transportation Plan  Capital Facilities Plan  Council 2-year Strategic Plan Shoreline Master Program  2019 Planning Report • Led by Fire Dept. • See Nov 6 Council mtg, where this plan was approved. • Linked here.  2014 North Olympic Development Council (NODC) Resilience Plan • Cost estimates of policies and cost abatement. • Build on, don’t replicate.  Solid Waste Plan (underway) • Focus on composting.  Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe • Kim Williams is the contact for planning. • Climate Planning. • Lindsey was the previous point of contact.  2009 Sustainable Design Assessment Team Report • Urban design features partially incorporated into Comp Plan.  Clallam County Planning Process • Guides planning between Clallam County and cities. Appendix C Port Angeles Resiliency Plan - Kick-off Meeting January 26, 2021 | page 5 • Standards for new development especially around the unincorporated areas around Port Angeles. Relevant standards, ordinances, programs, and policy Policy Notes VMT thresholds Water-Efficient Landscape Standards  Water & sewer service • Urban Service Standards & Guidelines provide entry-level standards for new infrastructure Tree Ordinance Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Policy Traffic Calming Program  Floodplain Ordinance Zoning Code Green Building Ordinance Street Lighting  Micro-mobility • Clallam Transit is currently doing an operational analysis. • First mile/last mile issues with rural transit.  City council resolutions • Several passed on climate. City to provide.  2010 Wildfire Risk Study by Dwight Barry • Clea Rome to provide.  Land Trust’s newest climate study • Will be finalized this Spring. • Clea Rome to provide.  EDF State-led Climate Action Report  E2SHB 2311 and RCW 70A.45.020 Sets WA state GHG reduction goals: • By 2030, reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 45 percent below 1990 levels, or 50 million metric tons. • By 2040, reduce overall emissions of greenhouse gases in the state to 70 percent below 1990 levels, or 27 million metric tons. • By 2050, reduce overall emissions of greenhouse gases in the state to 95 percent below 1990 levels, or 5 million metric tons, and achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions.  Source? • The City has talked about transfer of development rights like the hundreds of acres at Morse Creek.  Climate Commitment Act (SB 5126) • Carbon pricing to fund transportation budget.  HEAL Act in 2021 legislative session • Review for ideas to include in Resiliency Plan. 2019 Housing Action Plan • Active Projects Document Notes  CAPG list of strategies/actions ADA Transition Plan Appendix C Port Angeles Resiliency Plan - Kick-off Meeting January 26, 2021 | page 6 Brainstorming/Questions COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT (MIKE) What do you hope to achieve through public involvement? How do you see the City’s role in this process? • Help people understand what this process is trying to achieve. o Destigmatizing biases. o Open, public process. o Build trust in this process, recognizing high distrust in government among some residents. • Actively educate about sustainability practices. o Community-level. o Help people understand the basics. o Integrate climate education into classrooms: 6th grade is common for science courses for helping understand climate mitigation decision-making process of Cities. • We have an opportunity to help people understand the direct impact of climate change (e.g., Parks & Recs manages stormwater near a school). • Cohesive, self-sustaining community group ready to move forward on plan objectives and future planning efforts. o Potential website. o A potential board that actively engages with this plan and gives City Council recommendations on spending priorities. • Inspire community buy-in to the shape of the development to come by explaining how this opens new opportunities, improves their quality of life, and how much money they can save. o Understand how the Resiliency Plan benefits the individual, economically and otherwise. • Ensure compliance with the Open Public Meetings Act. • Keep the community engaged, recognizing the wealth of information that is being shared virtually now and looking ahead to the end of the pandemic. • Engage communities that are traditionally less involved. o Make this topic real and tangible, not an abstraction. o Make engagement feasible in the time people have available. o Meetings should be easily accessible (e.g., in-person meetings should be within walking distance). • Recognize unique time to act in our country right now. • City role: GHG reporting and accountability. • Provide a historical timeline/narrative of community sustainability/resource availability/quality of life for residents from 150 years ago to now. The historical narrative Appendix C Port Angeles Resiliency Plan - Kick-off Meeting January 26, 2021 | page 7 may help outline how population growth has impacted the environment (e.g., memories of when "logging was king and fishing was queen" and “Timber Wars” OPB podcast). Who are the key stakeholders and community groups in Port Angeles? Who is typically left out? Who are the strongest proponents and critics? • City Council is very supportive of climate action. 4 members of the City Council have school age children at home, so we have input from working families. • Find different champions for climate messaging (e.g., different effect of having National Guard talk about safety concerns with climate change). Appendix C Port Angeles Resiliency Plan - Kick-off Meeting January 26, 2021 | page 8 Stakeholder Group Specific Organizations Notes Local businesses Chambers Business associations Workforce development • Port Angeles Business Association • Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce • Economic Development Council (EDC) Major employers • City of Port Angeles • Clallam County • Olympic Medical Center • US Coast Guard • McKinley Papermill • North Olympic Healthcare Network • Peninsula College Olympic National Park Westport Yachts • Port of Port Angeles • Clallam PUD • Port of Port Angeles controls seaport and airport • Clallam PUD provides utility service to rural areas. Housing Homeowners Homeowner associations Housing assistance providers Building owners & property managers • North Olympic Builders Association Services Food banks Food recovery and donation Hospitals and clinics Libraries Environmentalists • Olympic Discovery Trail (cyclist group) Transit/transportation advocates • Clallam Transit Historically marginalized groups Tribal Nations Communities of color Limited/Non-English speaking communities Immigrant/refugee communities Households with low income People experiencing homelessness • Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe Faith-based communities Developers Appendix C Port Angeles Resiliency Plan - Kick-off Meeting January 26, 2021 | page 9 Stakeholder Group Specific Organizations Notes Education • Peninsula College • Port Angeles School District • Nature Bridge • Tribal schools • Opportunities for engaging children and their parents through tours of city infrastructure (e.g., landfills and mills). • Meet people where they are – reach parents through their kids. • Virtual meetings can be more accessible. • After school programs. • Engaging with Native American students through afterschool or HeadStart programs (e.g., Native American club at high school; Headstart at Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe school). Local media Other community groups • Volunteer CAPG • Young families (who don’t have time to engage) • Engage with schools. For those already engaged, what level of engagement has occurred? Any initial thoughts on the level of engagement for new stakeholders? This question was not discussed. Table 1. Level of engagement, adapted from the Movement Strategy Center. Note that it is really difficult to go “back” in level of engagement. 1 Inform 2 Consult 3 Involve 4 Collaborate Educate members of the group about the rationale for the project or decision; how it fits with City goals and policies; issues being considered, areas of choice or where input is needed. Gather information and ask for feedback from group to better inform the City’s work on the project. Work directly and consistently with group to ensure their concerns are understood and considered in the City’s planning process. Create a partnership to work along with groups and give them meaningful ownership developing and implementing the planning process or project. Activities • Social Media • Emails/Newsletters • Open houses • Presentations • Factsheets • Online surveys/polls • Public comment • Focus groups • Interactive workshops that engage volunteers • Community forums • Citizen advisory committees • MOUs with community-based organizations Appendix C Port Angeles Resiliency Plan - Kick-off Meeting January 26, 2021 | page 10 Thinking about those who like to be involved throughout planning processes, what engagement and communications approaches have worked well in the past? What has not worked well? Any new ideas based on lessons learned? • Virtual Workshops for active feedback • Presentations • Mailers with utility bills • Social media: Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Next Door, etc. • City newsletters and e-newsletters • City website • Surveys online • School classes – target online classes and virtual engagement. • Installations – info displays at popular destinations (e.g., parks, trails, libraries) Worked Well Didn’t Work Well New Ideas • Short meetings • Easily accessible meetings • Briefings/1:1s • Clallam County has a robust emergency resiliency outreach effort e.g. Undersheriff Ron Cameron, Health Officer Dr. Allison Berry, Anne Chastain with Emergency Management Planning Commission Subcommittee special meetings without prior planning – staff workload capacity issues (records and notification) Make it fun, positive, focused on solving multiple problems at once. Nextdoor App Thinking about those who prefer to be involved only at key decision points in a process, what engagement and communications approaches have worked well in the past? What has not worked well? Any new ideas based on lessons learned? This question was not discussed. Worked Well Didn’t Work Well New Ideas Who is/should be involved from the City government? Do you plan to engage City Council, Boards, and Commissions and if so, at what points in the process? This question was not discussed. Ideally contacts will have some combination of the following: • Familiarity with department operations • Knowledge of budget procedures • Authority to implement strategies Based on everything discussed, does the project approach still feel right? This question was not discussed. Appendix C Port Angeles Resiliency Plan - Kick-off Meeting January 26, 2021 | page 11 GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) INVENTORY (TRISTAN) Which year would you like to assess as part of the inventory? Most jurisdictions choose the latest available calendar year (not a fiscal year), in this case 2020, because data is typically reported using the standard calendar year and is easier to use. However, given the inconsistencies within 2020, we recommend considering the following factors in making a decision: • Years that will be used for climate action goals (e.g., to be able to compare to other jurisdictions) • “Typical” year for the locality (e.g., no unusual weather or economic conditions). In this case, 2019 may be a more accurate representation of trends and conditions. o Confirmed 2019 for community and municipal inventories but check with County planning timeline.  Allyce Miller from Lower Elwha Klallam tribe reports that they are performing a carbon inventory for 2013 and 2019 under ICLEI software, with the possibility of doing 2020 as well. • Years that correspond to City planning intervals/dates. 2024 is the next GMA periodic review update, which may include a limited shoreline master program amendment concurrently. Which emissions sources to include? Cascadia will include, at a minimum, emission sources required by the U.S. Community Protocol and Local Government Operations Protocol (see table and graphics below). • 2007 Peninsula College inventory found forestry and transportation were large emitters on North Olympic Peninsula. o Volunteer group has focused on transportation because most electricity comes from hydropower. • Wastewater and landfill—landfill is capped and has flare that burns small amounts of methane. • Interest in locally generated energy. • Don’t have natural gas—only have propane. Have 2-3 distributors. • Angel can get list of diesel and propane generators. o Elwha public facilities have back-up generators that are diesel/propane. • Could use building permits for wood stove estimates. • Outside scope of a normal carbon inventory, but emissions from large ships idling or moving in the harbor are a huge source of emissions. o Port does have shore power available when docked (using municipal electricity), so we will be measuring ships when docked anyway. Appendix C Port Angeles Resiliency Plan - Kick-off Meeting January 26, 2021 | page 12 • Consider the indirect cost of energy sources to other resources (e.g., people refer to hydro as clean energy, but dams significantly impact salmon populations). For municipal inventory: • Facilities probably has refrigerants data. • There is an employee commute trip reduction tool for Port Angeles. o CED Dept: Last commute reduction survey was performed in 2010. Community inventory emissions sources and scope categories Emissions Type Required? Scope 1 Scope 2 Scope 3 Notes Residential Energy Electricity   Natural Gas   Commercial Energy Electricity   Natural Gas   Industrial Energy Electricity   Natural Gas  Transportation On-Road Passenger Vehicles   On-Road Freight Vehicles   On-Road Transit Vehicles  Off-Road Vehicles and Equipment  Air Travel  Solid Waste, Potable Water, and Wastewater Solid Waste   Potable Water Use Energy*   Wastewater Treatment   Refrigerant Leakage   Agriculture  * Potable water use energy—energy associated with treating and distributing potable water systems in Port Angeles (e.g., from pumping stations)—would be included in the non-residential energy consumption sector. Energy used for pumping individual wells would be included in the residential energy consumption sector. Appendix C Port Angeles Resiliency Plan - Kick-off Meeting January 26, 2021 | page 13 Municipal inventory emissions sources and scope categories Emissions Type Required? Scope 1 Scope 2 Scope 3 Notes Buildings and Facility Energy Electricity   Natural Gas   Streetlights and Traffic Signals   Transportation On-Road Fleet Vehicles   Off-Road Vehicles   Employee Commute  Business Travel  Solid Waste, Potable Water, and Wastewater Solid Waste   Potable Water Use Energy   Wastewater Treatment   Refrigerant Leakage   Appendix C Port Angeles Resiliency Plan - Kick-off Meeting January 26, 2021 | page 14 PLAN DEVELOPMENT (ANDREA MACLENNAN) How do you intend to use the Climate Resiliency Plan document (e.g., communications, implementation, public-facing)? • Plan for enhancing Critical Areas and Shoreline Master Program updates expected prior to 2024. GMA requires the City to align with best available sciences and best practices. • Cost/cost abatement and financing. Interest in carbon market/pricing mechanisms. • Prioritize infrastructure development and means to reduce emissions. • Help meet GHG reduction goals on a civic-level. • Using the document to engage community on bigger picture issues like climate, zoning, and transportation. • Tool for City Council—single comprehensive, cohesive plan—to use to make decisions and prioritize investments. o Merge the final product with the Comprehensive Plan to convince City Council members to make major investments. o A way to integrate a lot of the other items the City does and plans they have. o Coordinate with stormwater basin planning and stormwater/sewer inventory. • A guide for climate refugees and being ready to receive them without sacrificing sustainability. • Educational tool—talking points that can be used to help the community to understand recommendations for changes in daily life of a family. What does “climate resiliency” for Port Angeles mean? • Tied to ability to function on the Peninsula, given larger global issues that will affect ability to function and access community. Appendix C Port Angeles Resiliency Plan - Kick-off Meeting January 26, 2021 | page 15 • A healthy watershed and natural resources, which support high quality of life. • Self-sufficiency. • Adaptation to sea level rise, drought, and wildfire while contributing to worldwide effort to mitigate carbon. • Walkable neighborhoods. • Development patterns that support resilience (e.g., not having sprawl which increases wildfire risk). • Triple bottom line: prosperous, inclusive, proactive. Looking back: reflections from past planning efforts. What went well? What didn’t? • Successes  Give community enough time to react and respond; don’t force timing. • Challenges  Limited staff capacity.  Generating an actionable result.  Actively engaging the community in a positive or actionable way to build plans, codes, etc.  Hope that this plan can help re-write the comprehensive plan. What is the balance of actions envisioned for this plan (e.g., community- municipal, resilience-carbon reduction)? For example, a 60:40 split between community and municipal actions would be a community-focused plan. • Assist evaluation of capital facilities plan and how those projects are developed. • Recommend developing balance as part of public process. • Whatever we do, base it in reality. What are your general concerns or questions about climate change or climate action? This question was not discussed. Are there particular climate risks you are worried about? Particular assets or vulnerabilities to pay attention to? • Access to US 101. • Summer drought and sea level rise are existential threats. o The Elwha River has low summer flow and provides the City’s water supply. Appendix C Port Angeles Resiliency Plan - Kick-off Meeting January 26, 2021 | page 16 o Adaptation International’s work on sea level rise suggests Port Angeles housing stocks may be less vulnerable.  This work uses a bathtub model that does not consider shoreline change, armoring, etc. so it may be an incomplete picture. o Working on groundwater wells in the summer. • Stormwater system in light of increased precipitation. o Rain and snow events have already overwhelmed the new stormwater system. • Catastrophic wildfires (see Barry study). o May destroy power lines. • Housing availability for current residents and future climate refugees—maybe from CA and areas where air conditioning is a must. • Shoreline impacts from rising sea levels. o Region may be okay according to Richie. o Will need to consider the impacts of existing structures built on the shoreline. • Sluicing due to increased extreme precipitation. RISKS (ANDREA MARTIN) These items were not discussed in the kick-off, but represent the risks discussed during preceding agenda topics. Participants will send input over email. Risk Mitigation/Action Inventory data collection challenges/delay for GHG inventory • Start data collection early. • Provide clear data collection checklist with guidance on sources/contacts. • If needed, use default factors as indicated by protocol, with ability to update when information is available. Political risk (e.g., Is Council ready to own and commit to the strategies in the plan?) • None. This was not noted as a major risk during the kick-off meeting. Community support & capacity Distrust in government • Engage audiences who are not traditionally involved. • Meet people where they are. • Make it real, not an abstraction. • Engage early and have one-on-one conversations to allay concerns. • Make sure tradeoffs and co-benefits are clear. • Transparent and honest communications and engagement. Appendix C Port Angeles Resiliency Plan - Kick-off Meeting January 26, 2021 | page 17 Risk Mitigation/Action Other issues seem more important or dilute/divert the attention away from climate change (i.e. COVID, equity, affordable housing, transportation) We are overwhelmed virtually • Highlight economic benefits. • Incorporate equity considerations within every conversation. • Discuss with the public what priorities are, emphasize the plan is a “living” document. • Call-out connection between key issues and climate change. • Transparent and honest communications and engagement. Staff capacity • Good plan for how to keep stakeholders and community members informed/involved/responsive. • Realistic deliverable dates Plan sits on a shelf • Engage community/City through process. • Make it relevant and “real.” • Ready to respond/inform each annual CFP prioritization process. • Project Logistics (optional; P.J.) Key Dates & Deliverables were discussed. All other topics in this section were not discussed. OVERARCHING ROLES These roles are intended to be consistent with—not replace—the roles outlined in the contract. Cascadia City of Port Angeles • Provide community and municipal inventory data collection instructions and guidance. • Analyze emissions using ClearPath software and file folder organization. • Lead community and municipal inventory data collection based on Cascadia guidance and instructions. • Lead public engagement implementation, with Cascadia’s support and guidance. • Coordinate with City Council and the Planning Commission. Appendix C Port Angeles Resiliency Plan - Kick-off Meeting January 26, 2021 | page 18 Cascadia City of Port Angeles • Lead public engagement strategy development, resiliency plan strategy development, and report writing. • Support and lead some aspects public engagement implementation, such as managing the volunteer group. • Facilitate and support planning process. • Draft and finalize plan. • Train staff on GHG inventory methodology. • Facilitate team meetings. • Invoicing and budget management. • Coordinate with internal City staff to support community engagement and plan development (liaise w/departments, support strategy development, set up city staff interviews). • Reviews draft deliverables. • Participates in check-in meetings and staff trainings. KEY DATES & DELIVERABLES OTHER KEY DATES OR DEADLINES TO KEEP IN MIND? • City Council meets Tuesday evenings o 1st and 3rd Tuesdays: Meeting o 4th Tuesday: Work session • Planning Commission meets 2nd and 4th Wednesdays in the evenings • Council breaks? Planning Commission breaks? • Other Boards/Commissions to engage? If so, how many times? • Other outreach activities to leverage (e.g., summer festivals, farmers market)? • Any periods of time that are difficult for engagement? (e.g., fall break, holidays, etc.) Project Timeline With Tasks and Deliverables (✦)JANFEBMARAPRMAYJUNJULAUGSEPOCTNOVDECJANFEBMARAPRMAYJUNJULTask 1. Kick-off Meeting & Project Management Kick-off meeting, project work plan + schedule ✦ Task 2. Public Outreach & Participation Plan Draft Outreach & Participation Plan ✦ Final Outreach & Participation Plan ✦ Public input to refine draft strategies and actions ✦ Task 3. Community & Municipal Greenhouse Gas Inventory Data collection checklist ✦ GHG Report for Community & Municipal Inventories ✦ Staff trainings ✦ Task 4. Climate Resiliency Plan Draft for City Review ✦ Draft for Public Review ✦ Draft for incorporation into the Comprehensive Plan cycle ✦ Final Submission to the WSDOC ✦ 20222021 Appendix C Port Angeles Resiliency Plan - Kick-off Meeting January 26, 2021 | page 19 TECHNOLOGIES/COMMUNICATIONS • SharePoint or Google Drive? – file folders for data collection and analysis • Project timeline – options for tracking project timeline o Smartsheet – detailed live tracking service but requires additional hours to set-up o Excel – simplified live tracking service w/ minimal set-up  Workbook can still change dates and track progress. o Word – simple workplan but is more static since it does not include a live tracking element like Smartsheet and Excel o Other? • ClearPath – for housing GHG inventory o Cascadia to use ICLEI permission for our own log-in. • Teams/Zoom/Skype – check-in and conference calls o Preference? o Allow for longer lead time to plan all tasks given communications challenges of COVID. • Website – will the City have a website for the planning process? • Style Guide/Graphics: o Does the City of Port Angeles have a style guide that they would like the final report and associated materials to follow? TEAM COMMUNICATIONS • P.J. included on all project management communication (budget, invoices, timelines, final deliverables) • P.J., Mike, and Tristan included on all project content communication. • Biweekly phone check-in meetings with P.J.; other Cascadia team members will be included when needed (P.J. will facilitate). • Do we need to cc: anyone on the City end? NEXT STEPS Port Angeles • Send materials to Cascadia. o City logos (eps and jpeg/png). o City style guide. o City templates, eg for reports, presentations, etc. o Documents and resources “checked” in the Background section, as you wish. • Clea Rome to share 2010 Wildfire Risk study (Dwight Barry) and once available, Land Trust climate study. • Review kick-off meeting notes. Add to Risks. Appendix C Port Angeles Resiliency Plan - Kick-off Meeting January 26, 2021 | page 20 Cascadia • Pull together a kick-off meeting notes summary and send it out for review. • Begin developing Public Engagement Plan. • Begin data collection process for GHG emissions inventories, including: o Provide list of diesel and propane generators. o Provide list of building permits for wood stove estimates. o Emissions/power used from large ships idling or moving in the harbor. o Employee commute reduction survey. Appendix C COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA AUGUST 2021 CASCADIA CONSULTING GROUP, INC. Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 2 Table of Contents Table of Contents _____________________________________________________________________ 2 Community Outreach for Climate Resiliency ________________________________________________ 3 Background ____________________________________________________________________________ 3 Project team _________________________________________________________________________ 4 Goals and Objectives _____________________________________________________________________ 5 Key Engagement Strategies ________________________________________________________________ 6 Roles _______________________________________________________________________________ 6 Approach Overview ___________________________________________________________________ 8 Detailed Methods ____________________________________________________________________ 10 Anticipated Concerns _________________________________________________________________ 15 Timeline and Budget ____________________________________________________________________ 17 Budget _____________________________________________________________________________ 17 Timeline ___________________________________________________________________________ 20 Appendix A. Key Messages to Support Engagement _________________________________________ 22 Appendix B. Community Demographics and Key Audiences ___________________________________ 24 Port Angeles Community Context __________________________________________________________ 24 Language needs _____________________________________________________________________ 25 Health Disparities Map ________________________________________________________________ 26 Key Audiences _________________________________________________________________________ 26 Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 3 Community Outreach for Climate Resiliency BACKGROUND The City and community of Port Angeles is developing a Climate Resiliency Plan to inventory and reduce its community and municipal greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions while building resilience to climate change impacts and related stressors. The City wants to achieve carbon neutrality by 2030, which exceeds WA State GHG Emissions reduction goals, established in E2SHB 2311 and RCW 70A.45.020. The Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan will build on current and prior work and identify new opportunities for ambitious, feasible, and equitable climate action that reduces Port Angeles’ GHG emissions and builds readiness for climate impacts like sea level rise and increased flooding. This current and previous work includes, but is not limited to: • 2019 Resiliency Plan: Recommendations Addressing Climate Change for City of Port Angeles • 2015 Climate Change Preparedness Plan for the North Olympic Peninsula • Clallam Transit’s Comprehensive Operational Analysis • EPA Decision Integration for Strong Communities (DISC) Application • 2019 Planning Report • Shoreline Master Plan • 2009 Sustainable Design Assessment Team Report Economic Development Plan • Transportation Plan • Capital Facilities Plan • Hazard Mitigation Plan • Previous Engagement Work conducted by the Climate Action Planning Group • Other relevant standards, ordinances, & policies Public outreach and participation are essential to this process, and the City is committed to centering equity and respect for all community members. This will lead to a Climate Resiliency Plan that reflects the communities’ priorities and values, builds capacity and interest in sustainable behavioral change from residents, and increases the community buy-in that is important for successful long-term implementation of the Resiliency Plan. This Community Outreach for Climate Resiliency (Plan) has been developed to: • Create a strategic framework for an inclusive and robust public engagement process for the development of the Climate Resiliency Plan. • Delineate key roles for the City, the CAPG, and Cascadia Consulting Group (the consultant hired to support development of the Resiliency Plan) in the public engagement process. This includes a detailed workplan that operationalizes the roles described herein. • Provide clear and consistent key messaging about the Climate Resiliency Plan, with the understanding that additional messages may need to be developed as the process progresses. This Plan includes: • Outreach & participation goals, objectives, strategies and roles • Budget and timeline • Appendices with supporting details o A. Key messages to support engagement o B. Community demographics and key audiences Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 4 Project team Project Managers: Ben Braudrick (City of Port Angeles), P.J . Tillmann (Cascadia) City Staff: Emma Bolin Planning Committee: Ben Stanley, Richie Ahuja Community Volunteers: Climate Action Planning Group 1 Cascadia Outreach Support: Andrea Martin, Mike Chang, Tristan Smit, Aaron Tam 1 Members of the Climate Action Planning Group (CAPG) are listed in Appendix B. Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 5 GOALS AND OBJECTIVES Vision: Develop and implement a people-centered Community Outreach Strategy for Climate Resiliency that foments sustainable behavioral change from residents, builds public support for climate resiliency actions, and ensures the long-term success of the Climate Resiliency Plan. Goal A Communicate and empower residents in the climate resiliency planning process by educating and energizing Port Angeles’ residents about climate change and the process. Objective 1: Equip residents with a baseline level of knowledge of climate resiliency and sustainability concepts and practices, including the urgency of the climate crisis, and convey how the climate resiliency planning process relates to and supports the interests and values of all audiences within the community. Objective 2: Educate residents, businesses, and leaders about the co-benefits of climate resiliency planning that leads to long-term behavioral and systemic change for community-wide resiliency for climate change. Objective 3: Increase understanding of the urgency of the climate crisis in a way that helps motivate and inspire sustainable and climate-smart behavior change for Port Angeles residents and households. Goal B Build and inspire communitywide support for the Climate Resiliency Plan through a transparent, inclusive, and accessible process that is responsive to community concerns. Objective 1: Reduce barriers to participation for all audiences, ensuring that the community knows when, how, and why they can participate in the Climate Resiliency Plan process. Objective 2: Center the perspectives, needs, and priorities of the Port Angeles community—with a focus on frontline communities such as non-English speaking households, elders, youth, and people of color—by using relevant, in-language methods for different audiences across ages, industries, cultures, and locations. Objective 3: Have an open and public process that builds trust between the City and its communities by providing multiple engagement opportunities and ensuring transparency in how community input shapes the final Climate Resiliency Plan. Objective 4: Integrate community feedback at multiple touchpoints and ensure that the Climate Resiliency Plan is reflective of the communities’ priorities, values, and goals. Goal C Support the cohesive and self-sustaining CAPG ready to move forward with plan objectives and future planning efforts. Objective 1: Work collaboratively with the CAPG to further define clear roles, responsibilities, and decision-making processes for Resiliency Plan implementation. Objective 2: Provide resources to support the CAPG as ambassadors for community resiliency to climate change. Objective 3: Ensure that the CAPG is equipped with tools and methods for long-term community engagement and implementation after the conclusion of the planning process that is likely to be successful and consistent with other initiatives. Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 6 KEY ENGAGEMENT STRATEGIES Successful engagement requires tailored approaches to meet the assorted needs and priorities of key audiences and partners. We acknowledge that individuals and organizations within the key audience groups will vary in their understanding of climate change and climate impacts and their level of support for climate action. To that end, we will use several core engagement strategies to connect with audiences around their priorities and concerns—meeting audiences where they are at. Our approach is designed to engage a representation of the public across these spectra by reaching out to the following groups who are critical to implementing Climate Resiliency Plan strategies, will be most affected by Climate Resiliency Plan actions, and/or are typically harder-to-reach populations. This engagement plan will be implemented by the following groups: • Port Angeles City Staff (City). The City will be in charge of leading public engagement at pop-up events and through social media and online presence. They will also be leading engagement with City boards, commissions, and City Council. • Climate Action Planning Group (CAPG). The CAPG will be leading public engagement at pop-up events and at three (3) community meetings, where they can broadly engage with community members and key stakeholder groups. These meetings are in addition to the meetings and workshops that Cascadia will be leading. CAPG members will also lead disseminating information online (e.g., via social media, email, etc.), act as a key advisor in strategy and action development, and act as an accountability mechanism for the City and Cascadia. • Cascadia Consulting Group (Cascadia). Cascadia will be leading the development of communications collateral, two (2) public workshops, one (1) public survey, and support facilitation of the CAPG. Cascadia will also support the CAPG and City with their public and stakeholder engagement events, as needed and budget allows. Roles Engagement Strategy Lead Support Communications collateral Cascadia, CAPG, City Cascadia, as needed Two (2) public workshop Cascadia City, CAPG One (1) public survey Cascadia CAPG Three (3) community meetings CAPG Cascadia Pop-up events City, CAPG — Engagement meetings with key implementation partners City CAPG, Cascadia Facilitation of the CAPG Cascadia — Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 7 Engagement Strategy Lead Support Briefings at public meetings and City boards/commissions City Cascadia City website updates, newsletters, social media, and other communication channels City, CAPG Cascadia Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 8 Approach Overview Below is our approach overview, which includes the roles in parentheses. Subsequent sections in this Plan will provide details on bolded strategies. See Appendix B for a detailed list of stakeholders. Goal A: Communicate and empower residents in climate resiliency planning process Goal B: Build and inspire communitywide support Goal C: Support the cohesive and self- sustaining community group Ongoing strategies Internal Stakeholders Decisionmakers – City Council City leaders whose decisions drive investment and policy  Council meetings (City)  Email updates & one-on-one meetings, as needed (City) Implementation Leads – City Staff City staff who are responsible for directing Resiliency Plan implementation.  Meetings, emails, or briefings, as needed (City) Guides and Analysts City commission or committee members who inform policy  Planning Commission meetings, emails, or briefings as needed (City and CAPG)  Planning Commissioners participation on the CAPG (CAPG) External Stakeholders Advocates Supportive and willing to put in effort to support Resiliency Plan process  Communications collateral (Cascadia and CAPG)  Community meetings (CAPG)  Stakeholder and partner engagement meetings (City)  Two (2) public workshops (Cascadia)  Facilitation of the CAPG (Cascadia)  City webpage (City)  Email listserv (City)  Social media (City)  City newsletter (City) Critical Perspectives Groups frequently not reached but critical to equitable outcomes Implementation Partners Conduct operations that affect the success of Resiliency Plan implementation Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 9 Goal A: Communicate and empower residents in climate resiliency planning process Goal B: Build and inspire communitywide support Goal C: Support the cohesive and self- sustaining community group Ongoing strategies General Public Resiliency Plan strategies and implementation affect day-to-day lives  Public survey (Cascadia)  Pop-up events and community meetings (CAPG) Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 10 Detailed Methods In the following sections, we detail our key methods for the following engagement strategies: • Communications collateral • Public workshops • Public survey • Community meetings • Pop-up events • Stakeholder engagement meetings • Facilitation of the CAPG • Briefings at public meetings • City website updates, newsletters, social media, and other communication channels COMMUNICATIONS COLLATERAL In order to support the wide variety of engagement strategies and key audiences, Cascadia will develop six (6) different key communications and outreach collateral with project messaging, visually rich and catchy graphics and images, and recommendations to inspire individual and community-wide climate action. Key engagement materials could include: • Visually rich factsheets that could provide an overview of the Climate Resiliency process, GHG emissions, sustainability practices, the need for urgent action from individual community members, client resiliency, and key reduction opportunities, and how to get involved. • Postcards that can be handed out community events (i.e., farmers markets) that raise awareness about the Climate Resiliency Plan process, and drive participants to sign up for updates and workshops. • Messaging templates to be used for media, social media, and other communications by the City and CAPG. • Informational presentation to be used by outreach partners and volunteers at various community events. • Content for information displays at popular destinations. As budget allows and as necessary, outreach collateral can be translated into Spanish and additional materials can be developed. The following materials will be provided to anyone conducting outreach and all available online. In addition to the six communication materials that Cascadia will develop, the CAPG and the City will also lead development of their own outreach materials as needed and relevant (e.g., the City may want to have an article they want to draft for a local ad or newsletter; the CAPG may want to have tailored collateral for a K-12 audience). These efforts will be mutually exclusive. In these instances, Cascadia will help support them both in communications development. Key deliverables include: • Six (6) communication materials led by Cascadia. • Additional communication materials led by the City and the CAPG, with support from Cascadia, as needed. Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 11 VIRTUAL OR IN-PERSON PUBLIC WORKSHOPS Interactive workshops are productive ways to get specific and actionable feedback from key stakeholders, concerned residents, and other interested community members. For the Climate Resiliency Planning process, Cascadia will host and facilitate two public engagement workshops. These workshops will be held at key points of the Climate Resiliency Planning process, listed below. • Workshop #1 will focus on action development to be included in the Climate Resiliency Plan. • Workshop #2 will focus on reviewing the draft of the Climate Resiliency Plan. Each workshop will be 1.5-hours. Virtual or in-person workshops will be based on the City’s most recent COVID-19 protocols. Cascadia will work with the City and CAPG on promoting these workshops to the broader public, key organizations, community leaders, and community members—with an emphasis on recruiting historically underserved community groups—through a variety of channels, which could include: • Updates on the City website • Email listserv updates • Social media posts • City-wide newsletters • Posters at key community places—such as stores, community centers, schools, and libraries • Radio announcements Key deliverables for each workshop—which will be led by Cascadia—are anticipated to include: • Workshop agendas o Provide copy for upcoming events in the form of event descriptions for the project webpage, blog posts, social media posts, and newsletter content. • Workshop materials such as discussion guides, presentations, etc.2 o Provided translated materials, if necessary. • Brief summaries of each workshop, with a focus on key input to the Climate Resiliency Plan 2 For virtual workshops, physical materials can be mailed to community members or groups without reliant access to broadband, if requested. While we will adhere to COVID-19 protocols, we have outlined some of the pros and cons of virtual and in-person workshops. Pros Cons Virtual workshop • Can lower barriers of participation for individuals – especially those who have typically not engaged (e.g., working parents, non- English speakers). • Can facilitate more feedback via chat functions or other virtual facilitation platforms. • Can be recorded for future reference. • Technological barriers for people who don’t have computers, reliable internet bandwidth, or unfamiliar with virtual workshop technology platforms. • If participants have cameras off, it can be harder to connect with other workshop participants. • Potential for “Zoom bombing”. In-person workshop • Easier for people to access who don’t have technology access at home. • Can facilitate more group collaboration because of in-person nature of events. • Travel to a physical location can be a barrier of participation – especially those unable to drive or travel, working parents, or youth. • Typically more expensive, because of venue, printing, food, and travel costs. Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 12 PUBLIC SURVEYS Public surveys can be used to gather feedback from the broader community. It allows for the flexibility for community members to provide feedback on their own timeline, which can be a benefit for those that might have conflicts with workshop dates or times. Cascadia will lead the development and analysis of one (1) public survey, hosted on a survey platform such as SurveyMonkey, focusing on gathering feedback and review of the draft Climate Resiliency Plan. However, because there is only one survey, Cascadia can repurpose the survey objective if needed. The City and the CAPG will provide revisions to the survey and help support distributing surveys via the following methods: • Updates on the City website • Email listserv updates • Social media posts • City-wide newsletters • Posters at key community places—such as stores, community centers, schools, and libraries • Radio announcements The public survey will be open for approximately one (1) month. Key deliverables will include: • One 15 to 20 question public survey • Distribution of survey via communication channels • 3-5 page memo detailing public survey results COMMUNITY MEETINGS Having community-run meetings can be a powerful to engage the broader community by meeting them where they are at—such as schools, community centers, or businesses. The CAPG, with support from Cascadia, will lead up to three (3) community meetings. The CAPG will focus on facilitating these meetings, with meeting objectives to be determined between CAPG and Cascadia. Likely objectives include: • Educating the community on climate change impacts, climate adaptation, climate mitigation, and the urgency of the climate crisis • Informing the community on the Climate Resiliency Plan • Informing the community about additional engagement opportunities • Gathering feedback from the community about what they want to see in the Climate Resiliency Plan, especially on individual actions—or actions that community members are willing to do (e.g., transition to electric vehicles, install energy efficient appliances) • Educating the community on what they can do to reduce their GHG footprint and help progress climate action Considerations to run successful meetings include but are not limited to: • Recruit local experts, such as Ian Miller from Washington Sea Grant, to present at these meetings. • Determine clear roles, responsibilities, and timing for those who are planning and staff meetings. This includes identifying facilitators, notetakers, marketing and event promotion, people to staff welcome tables, and any other meeting roles. To support note-taking, which can Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 13 help ensure transparency in the Climate Resilieny Plan’s process and ensure that the community sees their feedback integrated into the final Climate Resiliency Plan. Cascadia will develop a meeting summary template. • Provide CAPG members with resources to discuss climate change with community members. In particular, resources for those who may be opposed to climate action will be helpful. Additional information is provided below. • Set expectations for participants, which includes setting community guidelines and agreements to create a welcoming and inclusive space for all. Additionally, Cascadia can help support the CAPG in providing mechanisms to address community participants that may be opposed to climate action. While there are multiple resources to leverage (see: Climate Reality Project’s “Starting the Conversation – Five Tips on How to Talk to Climate Deniers in Your Family”; Yale Climate Communication’s “An expert’s advice on talking to the climate skeptic in your life”; California Governor’s Office of Planning and Research’s “Who are the Deniers?”; and the New York Times’ “So You Want to Convince a Climate Change Skeptic: Here are some strategies for a hard conversation”.), some potential ways to respond to climate action opponents include: • Center values, not facts. Many climate skeptics may dispute the credibility of scientific facts. Research has shown that arguing on the credibility of climate science can alienate climate skeptics even further. Focusing on values—such as economic resilience, patriotism, religion & faith, defending the purity of nature, or community well-being—can be effective ways to find common ground.3 o However, come prepared with some evidence, but know when to back off. Most people are open to hearing contrasting opinions. If someone is skeptical of climate change, ask them: 1) what might convince you to believe in climate change or the need for climate action?; 2) Where are the areas you feel uncertain or skeptical about? While some people are hardline climate deniers, they are a small percentage of people in the U.S. (approximately 13%). • Listen and ask questions. Like stated before, many people are climate skeptics because of values. Active listening and asking open questions, especially without prejudice, can make people feel like they are being heard. Asking questions invites people to ask themselves how they came to believe what they do and why they still do, while keeping the door open for changing their own mind themselves. o If people are being disruptive during a public community meeting, listening to them, asking questions, and acknowledging you are recording their comments is a powerful tool to de-escalate disruption. Oftentimes, people just want to be heard. As a meeting host, you can make sure that their opinion matters—even if it is counter to the group majority. • Share personal stories. People may not believe the credibility of climate science, but if you are a trusted person, sharing your stories can make the issue of climate change real and tangible for them. • Be flexible and acknowledge the work will continue to happen. For some people, being skeptical of climate change has been a learned opinion. A single conversation often will not be 3 Wolsko et al. (2016). Red, White, and Blue Enough to be Green: Effects of Moral Framing on Climate Change Attitudes and Conservation Behaviors. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. DOI: 10.1016/j.jesp.2016.02.005. Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 14 sufficient to change someone’s mind, but continuous empathetic conversations can gradually bring them into the conversation for urgent climate action. Cascadia will support the CAPG in developing meeting materials. This can include: • Meeting agendas • PowerPoint presentations • Handouts • Meeting summary templates POP-UP EVENTS Pop-up events at community events can be an ad-hoc way to promote upcoming engagement events and increase public awareness of the Climate Resiliency Plan to a broad range of community members. Typically, pop-up events can happen at farmers markets, open houses, festivals, or fairs. The CAPG and the City will lead pop-up events. Communication collateral, which will be developed by Cascadia, should be used at these pop-up events. ENGAGEMENT MEETINGS WITH KEY IMPLEMENTATION PARTNERS Engaging key implementation partners will be important to do, especially as we develop strategies, actions, and implementation plans for the Climate Resiliency Plan. There will likely be a set of actions that will require partnerships between the City and these other external groups. The City will lead all meetings with key implementation partners, including: • Port of Port Angeles • National Park Service, including Olympic National Park and Olympic National Forest • U.S. Coast Guard • Clallam County • Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce • Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe Cascadia and the CAPG will support the City in identifying meeting objectives, desired meeting outcomes, and attend on as-needed basis. FACILITATE THE CLIMATE ACTION PLANNING GROUP (CAPG) The City of Port Angeles already has an active community volunteer group—the CAPG—that has developed a list of climate action strategies, engaged with the broader Port Angeles community pre-COVID, and continued to stay politically involved in the process to develop the Climate Resiliency Plan. Cascadia will support the CAPG by attending and facilitating up to three (3) meetings, in addition to the kick-off meeting. These meetings include: • A Meet and Greet between Cascadia and the CAPG and identify goals for the Climate Resiliency Plan and the engagement approach. • A meeting to: o Foundation setting: Share initial results of the GHG analysis, approve the engagement plan, and develop vision, goals and priorities. Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 15 o Initial action development: Identify and narrow potential actions from an initial list Cascadia prepares based on the 2019 action list developed by the CAPG. Use this meeting to identify and refine initial actions and prioritize action evaluation criteria. o Draft plan review: Evaluate and vet the draft priority list of actions for the draft Climate Resiliency Plan. o Finalize plan: Confirm the feedback received and approve the final plan prior for public release. In addition to these meetings, Cascadia will communicate updates on the Climate Resiliency Plan’s progress to the CAPG. Key deliverables—led by Cascadia—include: • Meeting agendas • Meeting summaries BRIEFINGS AT PUBLIC MEETINGS The City will lead meetings with key City staff and leaders, such as City Council and the Planning Commission. These meetings can: 1) ensure that key governmental partners are continuously informed about the Climate Resiliency Plan and its status and 2) ensure that the process is open, transparent, and compliant with the Open Public Meetings Act. Cascadia can help prepare or attend these meetings, as budget allows. Key deliverables—led by the City with support from Cascadia as capacity allows—include: • Development of presentations and other materials tailored to the public meetings. • Presentation of Climate Resiliency Plan updates at key milestones. CITY WEBSITE UPDATES, NEWSLETTERS, SOCIAL MEDIA, AND OTHER COMMUNICATION CHANNELS The City currently has a website for the Climate Resiliency Plan (https://www.cityofpa.us/1010/Climate- Resiliency-Plan). The City will lead all updates to the website. Additionally, the City will lead social media and newsletter coordination. The City will lead the development of any communication collateral not already developed by Cascadia. While not expected, the CAPG can also lead the development of social media posts to promote engagement events and opportunities, write articles about the Climate Resiliency Plan, and conduct additional communications (e.g., radio interviews) that they are comfortable with. Anticipated Concerns Understanding guiding principles and potential concerns can inform our engagement approach and how strategies can be successful in achieving our goals. Below, we outline our anticipated concerns for community engagement and ways we will address these concerns. The list of options to address concerns is not exhaustive and is intended to be a starting point for conversations with CAPG and the City. Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 16 Anticipated Concerns Options and Approaches to Address Concerns • Unexpected challenges relating to data collection, which will affect the GHG Emissions Inventory timeline. • Cascadia will ensure an accurate and timely GHG emissions inventory by proactively communicating with key CAPG members and City staff to identify GHG inventory data and adhering to current best practices and best available science, as outlined by ICLEI GHG Inventorying protocol. Cascadia, City staff, and CAPG may discuss the use of default factors as indicated by the protocol, with the ability to update when information is available. In the original project timeline, there was a 3-month buffer that we can utilize if needed. Furthermore, Cascadia can work with CAPG and the City to condense other parts of the process to meet the final deadline for the Climate Resiliency Plan in summer 2022. • Distrust in government by the communities that we are trying to reach. • Cascadia will ensure that there will be detailed summaries and notes of each engagement event (e.g., workshops, meetings, surveys) to ensure transparency and build trust in the process. • Community support and capacity dependent on other top-level community priorities and concerns, such as COVID-19, equity, affordable housing, transportation, etc. • At every opportunity, the City, CAPG, and Cascadia will ensure that the Climate Resiliency Plan will integrate considerations of other topics. We will also take advantage of other ongoing public processes to cross-pollinate climate change with other topics. • Both staff and the public are overwhelmed by amount of time spent in virtual spaces. • The City, CAPG, and the Community will use a combination of engagement approaches – including in-person events and paper/online surveys – to reduce overwhelm of being in remote and virtual meetings. Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 17 Anticipated Concerns Options and Approaches to Address Concerns • Long term use and importance of the Plan – want to build a Plan that is relevant, real and evolves to meet the needs of the community as time progresses. • The City, CAPG, and Cascadia will build in a robust and actionable implementation plan, which can include key implementers, partners, estimated cost to implement, and timeline of implementation. • Community leaders are concerned about City staff capacity to fulfill their commitments. The CAPG will need to hold them accountable for this Climate Resiliency Plan. • In working collaboratively, the City, CAPG, and Cascadia can act as checks and balances on each other to ensure that each groups fulfills their role in this Community Outreach Strategy for Climate Resiliency. • There may be some hesitancy from some community members to not implement individual climate action. • In addition to building a transparent process, we will ensure that some of our engagement efforts—such as developing communication collateral, leading public workshops, or leading community meetings—will include opportunities for Port Angeles residents to take initiative and leadership on climate action. TIMELINE AND BUDGET Budget The table below describes how the community engagement budget will be spent and key assumptions about the responsibilities of City staff and the Cascadia team. Engagement Approach Frequency Consultant Budget or Level of Capacity Communications Collateral 6+ Cascadia will lead the development of 6 communication materials. The City and CAPG will develop any additional tailored materials, with Cascadia support, as needed. $4,410 Virtual or In-person Public Workshops 2 Cascadia will lead the development and facilitation of two (2) 1.5-hour workshops. This $17,369 Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 18 Engagement Approach Frequency Consultant Budget or Level of Capacity budget includes materials development, summary, consultant attendance, marketing and logistics Public Surveys 1 Cascadia will lead the development, analysis, and summary of one (1) 15-20 question public survey. $6,238 Community Meetings 3 The CAPG will lead up to three (3) community meetings with the support of Cascadia. Cascadia will support development of meeting agendas, presentations, and materials. The CAPG will host and facilitate these community meetings. CAPG capacity to host and facilitate meetings $1,200 Pop-up Events As many as capacity allows The City and CAPG will lead communication of the Climate Resiliency Plan at pop-up events, such as fairs or farmers markets. Will use the communications collateral developed by Cascadia. City staff and CAPG capacity to lead attendance at pop-up events Engagements Meetings with Key Implementation Partners Ongoing The City will lead all meetings with key implementation partners and stakeholders. Cascadia and CAPG will help support the City by identifying objectives, desired outcomes, and attend on an as-needed basis. City staff capacity to lead CAPG capacity $1,000 Facilitate the CAPG Up to 3 meetings Cascadia will lead and facilitate up to three (3) meetings with the CAPG. Cascadia will be in charge of meeting agendas and summaries. CAPG capacity to attend meetings $6,710 Briefings at Public Meetings Ongoing The City will lead the briefings at public meetings with key City staff and leaders (e.g., City Council and Planning Commission). Cascadia will support as budget allows. City staff capacity to lead Cascadia will support as budget allows Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 19 Engagement Approach Frequency Consultant Budget or Level of Capacity City Website Updates, Newsletters, Social Media, and Other Communication Ongoing The City will lead and coordinate communication updates via the website, newsletters, social media, and other communication channels. The CAPG will also help support communications development and dissemination as capacity allows. City staff capacity to lead CAPG to support as capacity allows Cascadia will support as budget allows Total $36,927 Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 20 Timeline Below is the public outreach and engagement timeline (see Task 2), framed within the overall project timeline. Project Timeline 2021 2022 With Tasks and Deliverables (✦) JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL Task 1. Kick-off Meeting & Project Management Kick-off meeting, project work plan + schedule ✦ Task 2. Public Outreach & Participation Plan Public Outreach & Participation Plan ✦ Communications Collateral ✦ Virtual or In-person Public Workshops (2) ✦ ✦ Public Surveys (1) ✦ Community Meetings (Up to 3) Pop-up Events (Ongoing) Engagement Meetings with Key Implementation Partners (Ongoing) Facilitate the CAPG (Kickoff Meeting + 3 additional meetings) a ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ City Website Updates, Newsletters, Social Media, and other Communication (Ongoing) a While there are 5 Cascadia-led CAPG meetings scheduled, there is budget for at least four (4) of these meetings. The kick-off Meet and Greet has already happened in March 2021. There is a possibility that our budget will accommodate a 5th meeting with the CAPG. Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 21 Project Timeline 2021 2022 With Tasks and Deliverables (✦) JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL Task 3. Community & Municipal Greenhouse Gas Inventory Data collection checklist ✦ GHG Report for Community & Municipal Inventories ✦ Staff trainings ✦ Task 4. Climate Resiliency Plan Draft for City Review ✦ Draft for Public Review ✦ Draft for incorporation into the Comprehensive Plan cycle ✦ Final Submission to the WSDOC ✦ Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 22 Appendix A. Key Messages to Support Engagement Why should I participate in this process? • The City of Port Angeles is building on prior work conducted by the Climate Action Planning Group (CAPG) and the North Olympic Resource Conservation and Development Council to integrate an ambitious Climate Resiliency Plan in its Comprehensive Plan update. Because of this, this is an important opportunity to shape the vision and direction of the City’s resiliency planning efforts and comes at a crucial juncture in our city’s and broader society’s history. Your input will influence the solutions selected to do our part in global climate action and also influence broader City decisions around housing, land use, transportation, parks and green space, and more. • This is an ongoing opportunity to tell us your priorities and concerns when it comes to resilient City and community practices and policies enacted to help address climate change. By participating, you have an opportunity to help guide the development of the City’s climate resiliency strategies. • This is an opportunity to learn what you can do to help create a vibrant and sustainable Port Angeles for years to come. • The City Port Angeles’ Climate Resiliency Plan is not just a guidance document, it will be integrated into the City’s Comprehensive Plan to support the City and community in creating climate solutions through public investments, individual actions for change, and sustainable business strategies and opportunities. • We are also in a time where we are addressing multiple global issues such as climate change, racial justice, and COVID-19 recovery. Given the City’s limited resources and many competing demands, your input helps us be as responsive as possible to the community’s shared priorities and needs, and to generate win-win strategies. A Climate Resiliency Plan can help bring about community benefits in the form of financial benefits through reduced utility costs and business incentives, improved health, housing security and anti-displacement efforts, food security, and education. How will my feedback be used? • Public input will be an essential part of this resiliency planning process. All public input will be heard and considered along with input from City staff, City leaders, a volunteer community group (the CAPG), and other partners throughout the planning process. • All communications will be documented and shared out publicly. • The feedback received from our community engagement—in complement with prior work from the CAPG—will inform the vision, goals, strategies, actions, and implementation of Port Angeles’ Climate Resiliency Plan. Actions or issues that cannot be addressed through this planning process will be listed as suggested actions suitable or complementary to other projects, programs, or services as deemed appropriate. What is a climate resiliency plan? • Greenhouse gas emissions from transportation, energy use, land use change, and other sources are changing our climate in ways that already put the community at risk. Projected changes in temperature, Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 23 snowpack, severe storms, sea-level rise, and wildfire risk could threaten City infrastructure, natural resources, and public health. • A climate resiliency plan is a plan to reduce a City’s greenhouse gas emissions and prepare for the impacts of climate change that are unavoidable. By taking action to reduce the City’s emissions and prepare for climate risks, the City will position itself to be ahead of the curve and protect the health and well-being of our residents and economy. • In addition, this climate resiliency plan will help support and ensure the resiliency and self-sufficiency of Port Angeles’ residents in extreme circumstances and events—such as loss of transportation routes due to earthquakes or tsunamis—allowing the community to continue to respond and sustain itself. Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 24 Appendix B. Community Demographics and Key Audiences PORT ANGELES COMMUNITY CONTEXT The City of Port Angeles is vibrant and prospering, nurturing a balance of innovation and tradition to create an environmentally, economically, and fiscally sustainable community, accepting and cherishing its social diversity, small-town character and natural setting. Specifically, the goal is participation across diverse socio- economic, geographic, occupational, racial, and ethnic backgrounds to foster understanding of the climate resiliency planning process, education about sustainability practices, and inspire community buy-in. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the City of Port Angeles has an estimated population of approximately 19,832 persons in 2019. This demographic information can help inform public engagement, such as tailoring key messages, identifying priority audiences, and support an inclusive engagement process (e.g., translating materials to different languages). For example: • Since almost 20% of Port Angeles’ households do not have reliable internet access, ensuring that there are in-person opportunities to engage is important. • Additionally, knowing that about half of Port Angeles’ population owns their home, tailoring actions and strategies for homeowners may lead to higher impact. • Since almost three-quarters of the populations drives alone, tailoring actions that reduce single- occupancy vehicle trips can also lead to a higher impact. Other recent demographics are summarized as follows, based on the 2019 American Community Survey: Race White alone 86.9% American Indian and Alaska Native 2.8% Asian alone 2.5% Black or African American alone 1.5% Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander 0% Other race alone 1.1% Two or more races 5.2% Hispanic or Latino of any race 6.6% Age Under 5 years 6.4% 5-19 years 17.1% 20-44 years 32.2% 45-64 years 23.1% 65 and over 21.3% Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 25 Residents’ Place of Birth U.S. 96.3% Born outside the U.S.* 3.8% *Regardless of citizenship status Educational Attainment High school or equivalent 26.1% Some college, no degree 27.5% Associates degree 10.5% Bachelor’s degree 15.0% Graduate or professional degree 11.1% Languages English only 94.9% Language spoken at home other than English 5.1% • Spanish 2.2% • Other Indo-European languages 0.9% • Asian and Pacific Island languages 1.8% • Other languages 0.2% Housing Types Own 53.1% Rent 46.9% Computer and Internet Use Households with a computer 4 86.6% Households with broadband internet connection 5 81.7% Means of Transportation Drive alone 73.6% Carpool 11.9% Public Transportation 2% Walk 4.3% Bike 0.5% Mean travel time to work 19.8 minutes Language needs It is recommended that all project materials be translated into any languages spoken by more than 5% of a population. As Port Angeles’ population does not meet the 5% threshold for any language, we would 4 This statistic is not inclusive of smart phone ownership. 5 This is below the county average. In Clallam County, 87.3% of households have broadband internet connection. Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 26 recommend translations into Spanish or other Asian languages. Materials in other languages can be made available upon request. Health Disparities Map Below is a map from the Washington State Department of Health showing environmental health disparities based on the census tracts of Port Angeles. Environmental health disparities are measured by the cumulation of environmental exposures (diesel emissions, toxic releases from facilities, populations near heavy traffic roadways), environmental effects (lead risk from housing, proximity to hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facilities, wastewater discharge), socioeconomic factors (limited English proficiency, education, race and ethnicity, unaffordable housing, unemployment) and sensitive populations (death from cardiovascular disease, low birth weight). Darker blue colors indicate less pronounced health disparities. KEY AUDIENCES The following list includes key audiences to engage regarding the Climate Resiliency Plan’s development process. This is not an exhaustive list and will serve as a guide during outreach. The levels of engagement are a helpful tool to strategize who, how, and when partners can actively be brought into the climate resiliency planning process. It is easier to gear up for additional levels of engagement with stakeholders; scaling back in levels of engagement can reduce trust in the process and is not recommended. Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 27 LEVELS OF ENGAGEMENT 1 Inform 2 Consult 3 Involve 4 Collaborate Educate members of the group about the rationale for the project or decision; how it fits with City goals and policies; issues being considered, areas of choice or where input is needed. Gather information and ask for feedback from group to better inform the City’s work on the project. Work directly and consistently with group to ensure their concerns are understood and considered in the City’s planning process. Create a partnership to work along with groups and give them meaningful ownership developing and implementing the planning process or project. Example Activities • Social Media • Emails/Newsletters • Open houses • Presentations • Factsheets • Online surveys/polls • Public comment • Focus groups • Interactive workshops • Community forums • Resident advisory committees • MOUs with community-based organizations Internal Audiences Audience & Description Groups Engagement Goal Decision-makers City and County leaders who make decisions that drive investment and policy  City Council  Clallam County Consult and update for decision-making. Implementation Leads City staff who are responsible for directing resiliency plan implementation in departments  Department heads and staff, specifically: o Planning o Community & Economic Development o Finance o Public Works o Legal o Fire Consult to gather feedback on potential strategies, align with priorities and processes, and garner support. Guides and Analysts City commission/committee members whose support and direction are important for community engagement, resiliency plan development, and implementation  Planning Commission  Climate Action Planning Group (CAPG)  Washington State University Extension Involve, as appropriate, to gather feedback on engagement opportunities and CAP strategies. Members of the CAPG include:  Aaron Lee  Allyce Miller  Ann Soule  Barb Maynes  Benji Astrachan  David Large  David Clark  David Mattern  Duane Morris  Ed Chadd  Jesse Waknitz  Justin Plavet  Justin Vendettuoli  Karen Weaver  Kenton Hotsko  Mindy Gelder  Nina Sarmiento  Noah Glaude  Pamela Hastings  Pam Wilder Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 28  Bill Atkinson  Bill Baccus  Bob Vreeland  Brian Phillips  Bruce Pape  Christeal Milburn  Christy Cox  Cindy J  Elliot Bays  Erin Shield  Evelyn Simpson  George Stratton  Ian Miller  Ian Nickel  Janet Atkinson  Janet Marx  Kristina Holtrop  Marilyn Eash  Mark Ozias II  Mel Messineo  Melissa Williams  Michael Clemens  Miguel Reabold  Mike Doherty  Pat Milliren  Pat Nachreiner  Rich Meier  Robert Knapp  Ryan Qualls  Sharah Truett  Sissi Bruch  Tera Dummitt External Audiences Audience & Description Groups Engagement Goal Advocates Very supportive of climate action and willing to put in effort to support the climate resiliency planning process. Environmental community-based organizations  Olympic Discovery Trail  North Olympic Development Council (NODC)  North Olympic Peninsula Environment Group  North Olympic Land Trust  North Olympic Group – Sierra Club  Clallam Conservation District Involve with to spread the word about the climate strategy; Involve in strategy development Community Groups and Critical Perspectives Community groups in Port Angeles that should be reached during public processes. Some of these groups have historically been hard to reach and are critical to equitable outcomes from climate strategy implementation Education  Peninsula College  Port Angeles School District  Nature Bridge  Tribal Schools  Queen of Angels Catholic Schools  Children’s Montessori School  College Success Foundation Consult through tailored outreach to create accessible opportunities to participate in climate strategy planning process and build/strengthen relationships with community groups or individuals for long-term engagement around sustainability and climate issues Historically marginalized groups  Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe  The Answer for Youth  Northwest Justice Project Port Angeles Office  Center for Inclusive Entrepreneurship Faith-based communities  First Baptist Church  Calvary Chapel Port Angeles  First Presbyterian Church of Port Angeles  Independent Bible Church  Lighthouse Christian Center  St. Matthew Lutheran Church  First United Methodist Church  Port Angeles Seventh – day Adventist Church  Clallam County Interfaith Earthcare Coalition  St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church  Holy Trinity Lutheran Church  Queen of Angels Catholic Church Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 29 Audience & Description Groups Engagement Goal Housing  Habitat for Humanity of Clallam County  Serenity House of Clallam County  Peninsula Housing Authority Other  Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula  Olympic Peninsula YMCA  United Way of Clallam County  Port Angeles Future Riders  Interfaith Community Clallam County  Clallam County Compassion Implementation Partners Conduct operations that affect the success of climate strategy implementation. Utilities  Clallam County PUD Inform about overall process; consult with to gather feedback Transit Agencies  Clallam Transit Contracted Services  Waste Connections Inc. Other public entities  Port of Port Angeles  U.S. Coast Guard Other service providers  Olympic Medical Center  North Olympic Healthcare Network  Peninsula Behavioral Health – Horizon Center  Port Angeles Food Bank  Healthy Families of Clallam County  First Step Family Support Center  Olympic Community Action Programs  Sea Mar  Catholic Community Services  Soroptimist Club  Rotary Club Business community  Port Angeles Business Association  Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce  Economic Development Council (EDC)  McKinley Papermill  Olympic National Park Westport Yachts  Port Angeles Downtown Association  Port Angeles Small Business Development Center  Port Angeles Association of Realtors Developers  North Olympic Builders Association  North Peninsula Building Association  Washington Multifamily Housing Association Appendix D COMMUNITY OUTREACH FOR CLIMATE RESILIENCY PORT ANGELES, WA | AUGUST 2021 | 30 Audience & Description Groups Engagement Goal General Public Climate strategies and implementation affect day-to-day lives.  Young families  Various groups and communities, e.g., those representing major employers, schools, and social/gathering places Inform throughout the process and consult on strategies and the draft CAP report Appendix D Date: July 28, 2021 To: Planning Commission From: Ben Braudrick, Associate Planner Subject: Synthesis of Planning Commission Performed Climate Resiliency SWOT Analysis of the 2019 Comprehensive Plan Background: On November 17, 2020 City Council directed staff to enter into a contract with Cascadia Consulting with a Scope of Work including four tasks: Task 1 – Kick-Off Meeting & Project Management Task 2 – Public Outreach & Participation Plan Task 3 – Community & Municipal Greenhouse Gas Inventory Task 4 – Climate Resiliency Plan In preparation for the completion of the Task 4 - Climate Resiliency Plan objectives, City Staff has worked with Cascadia and the Port Angeles Planning Commission to evaluate the City’s most recent adopted Comprehensive Plan using a Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) Analysis. A SWOT analysis identifies internal and external factors that could influence a goal or project. It can be used in planning processes, as a risk assessment tool, or an evaluation method. Typically, the “SW” applies to internal or current strategies and policies whereas the “OT” applies to external or future potential. The four evaluative methods asked the following questions of Planning Commissioners: • Strengths Assets and Resources: Where are areas in the Comp Plan that highlight actions that can support Port Angeles' Climate Resiliency Plan? • Weaknesses, Limitations, Restrictions, and Challenges: What are the ways that climate change and resiliency are missing in the Comp Plan? • Opportunities: What are some opportunities to leverage and increase climate resiliency considerations in the Comp Plan? • Threats: What could negatively impact the ability to integrate and make climate-informed decisions in the Comp Plan? Using the above questions as a baseline, on February 10, 2021 the Planning Commission began their discussion of how to approach the SWOT analysis. Through consensus it was decided each Planning Commissioner would be assigned with 1-3 individual elements of the plan (splitting up the Land Use Element into its four distinct land use types) to evaluate. Commissioners would submit their SWOT to staff to be placed in the Planning Commission Packet and present their findings to the Planning Commission at the Public Meeting for feedback. The Plan Elements were split up and presented in the following way: Appendix E Element Reviewing Commissioner Date Presented Growth Management ................. Richie Ahuja 05/12/21 Land Use – Residential .............. Ben Stanley 04/28/21 Land Use – Commercial ............ Ben Stanley 04/28/21 Land Use – Industrial ................. Steve Luxton Steven Switzer 07/14/21 Land Use – Open Space ............. Steve Luxton Steven Switzer 07/14/21 Transportation ............................ Colin Young 04/14/21 Utilities and Public Services ...... Richie Ahuja 05/12/21 Housing ...................................... Marolee Smith 03/24/21 Conservation .............................. Ben Stanley 02/24/21 Capital Facilities ........................ Andrew Schwab 05/12/21 Economic Development ............. Andrew Schwab 05/12/21 Parks and Recreation .................. Colin Young 04/14/21 Overall Planning Commission SWOT Consensus: As Planning Commissioners presented each Element’s SWOT analysis thematic similarities emerged throughout the Comprehensive Plan. By highlighting these themes, a more strategic update and review of the Comprehensive Plan can be performed using the guidance of the Climate Resiliency Plan. The following themes are in no specific order: Strengths: • Concurrent Development Practices: Concurrent development protects loss of open space and the costs involved in constructing and maintaining City infrastructure. A reduction in the need to maintain “leapfrog” infrastructure (where new development is disjointed from the existing) allows more funding towards resiliency-centric upgrades to already existing facilities. • Walkability and Transportation Equity: The Plan promotes urban design and development encouraging walkability and equity in the community. The more diverse a transportation system is, the more resilient it is. Some features include grid patterned streets, neighborhood-centric development, and higher density. • Affordable Housing: Housing affordability and accessibility are essential to community resiliency. Many of the Plan’s elements focus on integrating housing equity through affordability and accessibility, but do not provide requirements to ensure its creation and maintenance. • Environmental Stewardship: The Plan places an emphasis throughout on the importance of environmental stewardship, but it may not provide enough standards or direction related to resiliency. • Infill Development: Infill development protects open space, allows for resiliency-centric upgrades to existing facilities, fills in critical gaps to facilities, and if done correctly, creates neighborhood vibrancy. • Preservation of Open Space: Open space is a critical element of climate resiliency. Due to the City’s location between the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the Olympic Mountain Range, open space is an endangered land use within the City. The Plan consistently supports its protection and integration into development. • Green Infrastructure: The plan actively promotes green infrastructure, which is essential to a modern resilient community. • Appendix E Weaknesses: • No Mention of Climate Resiliency: Many of the Plan’s Elements do not directly reference climate resiliency in either their goals or policies. Another method of climate resiliency recognition could be creation of a new “Climate Resiliency” Element in the Plan. • Vague Policies and Unclear Direction: Many of the policies throughout the Plan use active terminology such as “encourage”, “consider”, and “promote”. These terms do not provide minimum standards and bright lines related to resiliency. Using terminology such as “shall”, “require", “reduce”, and “do not” or “no” can enforce minimum development standards that support resiliency. Providing examples of specific aspects of a goal’s climate resiliency creates clearer direction. Specific examples can be drawn from existing situations in Port Angeles, the North Olympic Peninsula, or Washington State and beyond. These examples will direct proper climate resilient efforts. • No Connection or Only Indirect Reference to Municipal Code: Relating goals and policies back to the Port Angeles Municipal Code it directly influences or directs will strengthen a goal’s relationship to the enforcement of climate resiliency. • Confusing Language: For the Plan to be successful goals and policies must be succinct, approachable, and operational. Every goal and policy must direct action, and that action should relate in some way to furthering resiliency. • Does Not Discourage Bad Design: Although the Plan encourages proper resilient design, it does not actively discourage or prohibit design that threatens resiliency. • Does Not Recognize Risk: More emphasis must be made to demonstrate the consequence of our community failing to become more resilient. Opportunities • Prioritize Climate Resilience: The current vision for Port Angeles revolves around our community becoming more resilient. More can be done in each element to reinforce the importance of resiliency by realizing our 20-year vision. • Focus on Density and Mixed Uses: As Port Angeles continues to grow, more emphasis on density and the mixing of uses and facilities will help continue to build resiliency. • Mention Changes Already Made: Reevaluation must occur to celebrate what has already been done to achieve Port Angeles’ vision of resiliency. • Connecting Transportation to Land Use: Transportation and land use are strongly connected through a relationship of location and access. More can be done to reinforce their relationship and the importance of this relationship for climate resiliency. • Partnerships: As a community with limited resources, the creation and maintenance of partnerships with other public agencies, not-for-profits, and local organizations will build vision, strength, and greater resiliency. As an isolated area, the North Olympic Peninsula also needs to partner together to protect our environmental, economic, and recreational assets regionally. • Greater Land Use Specificity: More emphasis could be placed on certain aspects of the City’s land uses in order to better understand their relationship to building resiliency. • Raising Environmental Protection Standards: Although the plan mentions the importance of environmental protection, more can be done to actively enforce and require protection. • Upgrading Existing Facilities: Focus on upgrading our existing facilities to become more efficient and inclusive is the most effective path forward in Port Angeles’ climate resiliency efforts. Appendix E • Diversity: Diversity is resiliency. Each element requires a goal directing and supporting diversity and inclusion both culturally, and through land use and community development. • Direct Connection Linking Regulation to Planning: In an effort to educate the community about climate resiliency, direct connections could be made to local, county, and state regulations that enforce or reinforce its importance. Relationships can be drawn between those regulations and our Plan’s goals and policies. • Connecting Environmental Standards and Climate Resiliency: Continuing to connect the dots between our community’s relationship to environmental degradation and current efforts towards reconciliation and mitigation will help educate the community about the importance climate resiliency. Threats • Continued Single Occupancy Vehicle-Centric Development: Promoting transportation equity and diversity is not the same as discouraging or continuing harmful land use patterns that contribute to the proliferation and necessity of the single-occupancy-vehicle. More must be done to diminish the focus on single occupancy vehicles and the immense land use they require to operate. • Clarity: Without a more defined climate resiliency-related vision, goals, and objectives, the Plan will fail to achieve its efforts towards improvements and efficiencies. • Weak Direction: The plan must define an active strategic baseline for future community development. • Lack of Vision and Scenarios: The plan lacks the understanding that the future is full of uncertainty due to climate change. As climate change drives increasing event severity and outcome uncertainty, more must be done to prepare. Designing select scenarios will help community leaders better understand the mitigation efforts required to change critical decision paths moving forward. Appendix E Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis First Review: July 14th | 1 SWOT Analysis A SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities & Threats) analysis identifies internal and external factors that could influence a goal or project. It can be used in planning processes, as a risk assessment tool, or an evaluation method. Typically, the “SW” applies to internal or current strategies and policies whereas the “OT” applies to external or future potential. The following is an example SWOT analysis template for the Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan. •What could negatively impact the ability to integrate and make climate-informed decisions in the Comp Plan? •What are some opportunities to leverage and increase climate resiliency considerations in the Comp Plan? •What are the ways that climate change and resiliency are missing the Comp Plan? •Where are areas in the Comp Plan that highlight actions that can support Port Angeles' Climate Resiliency Plan? Strengths, Assets & Resources Weaknesses, Limitations, Restrictions & Challenges ThreatsOpportunities Appendix E Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis First Review: July 14th | 2 SWOT Analysis A SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities & Threats) analysis identifies internal and external factors that could influence a goal or project. It can be used in planning processes, as a risk assessment tool, or an evaluation method. Typically, the “SW” applies to internal or current strategies and policies whereas the “OT” applies to external or future potential. The following is an example SWOT analysis template for the Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan. •What could negatively impact the ability to integrate and make climate-informed decisions in the Comp Plan? •What are some opportunities to leverage and increase climate resiliency considerations in the Comp Plan? •What are the ways that climate change and resiliency are missing the Comp Plan? •Where are areas in the Comp Plan that highlight actions that can support Port Angeles' Climate Resiliency Plan? Strengths, Assets & Resources Weaknesses, Limitations, Restrictions & Challenges ThreatsOpportunities Appendix E Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis First Review: July 14th | 3 Growth Management Chapter Key Objectives: Evaluate the Conservation chapter on how well it integrates climate change and resiliency. Identify additional opportunities and risks of integrating climate change in future iterations of the Growth Management chapter. Strengths Weaknesses • Open language from GMA that can be interpreted to support integration of climate and DEIJ into planning activities (P-2A- 01) • sets minimum standards for services (eg energy, transport, waste management, storm water management, etc (P-2A. 09 – 11) and for provision of community facilities • Requires demonstration of financial capability for continuous operations for any new facility • Seeks to integrate and maintain consistency of services between City, PAUGA, County. • limits annexation of land outside the PAUGA, and constrains land use within PAUGA (P-2B.01-03) • Requires that standards be maintained for for services such as waste, storm water management, energy delivery, etc in case there is additional land annexed from within the PAUGA boundary • Chapter does not explicitly take cognizance of climate resilience and climate risks. This can have repercussions on how the guidance in the plan is written and interpreted by the various stakeholders that rely on the document. Opportunities Threats • Add explicit language prioritizing climate resilience and management of climate risks while meeting the state compliance requirements under GMA. This could be added as Goal 2B. • Absence of specific guidance around climate risk and resilience could lead to continuation of business as usual and promulgation of new policies and investments detrimental to long term social, economic, and environmental stability of the city and the region. Appendix E Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis First Review: July 14th | 4 Land Use - Residential Chapter Key Objectives: Evaluate the Conservation chapter on how well it integrates climate change and resiliency. Identify additional opportunities and risks of integrating climate change in future iterations of the - Land Use - Residential - chapter. Strengths Weaknesses • Low impact development cited as framework for all land use (P- 3A.02) • P-3B.05 – Encouragement of grid-planned urban design is congruent with resilience efforts promoting walkable, diverse urban environments • P-3B.06 – Encouragement of site specific design is congruent with climate change resiliency and could be expanded upon • Goal 3C, emphasizing neighborhood-centric development, is congruent with sustainable urban development best practices • P-3C.05 – Encouragement of high density affordable housing in CBD is fully in line with sustainable development • Goal 3B needs to define “environment” more explicitly to reference climate change and sustainability (and needs to insert comma after environment) • P-3B.01 – reference to “urban services” in land use element is not relevant; reference to Capital Facilities element is unnecessary • P-3B.02 – reference to “reasonable shape” of single family lots is vague. Emphasis on shape of lots is restrictive of alternative residential uses and the flexibility required to address sustainable housing. Plan should explicitly allow irregular shaped and smaller lot development • P-3B.03 – Confusing language – should be edited down to reflect general acceptance and promotion of higher densities • P-3B.04 – The goal of promoting fire safety needs to be balanced with goals of promoting walkable urban environments. Compromise is necessary between suburban width roads previously seen as best practices for fire safety and with urban design goals promoting density (which aids climate change efforts by concentrating building in middle of existing urban area) • P-3B.05 – Cul-de-sacs and other auto-centric urban street designs should be actively discouraged, not supported conditionally • P-3C.02 – Specific focus on street sizes and auto access to higher density housing, under notion of traffic management, should be eliminated and replaced with understanding that higher density housing does not need to be paired with auto infrastructure. Apartment housing should be equally or predominantly paired with pedestrian infrastructure. Also the connection between larger streets and less traffic has been proven false (induced travel demand from larger streets has been proven true). Any Appendix E Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis First Review: July 14th | 5 auto-dominant infrastructure paired with housing requirements should specify bare minimum standards (simple auto access, no parking or street width requirements) Opportunities Threats • P-3C.04 – Pairing manufactured home and other home construction standards with zoning regulations – this can be rephrased and reworked to allow tremendous flexibility in higher density residential construction in the city rather than used as a restriction • There is a larger opportunity in this section to completely disconnect desired housing types and densities from automobile and street considerations and replace them with a connection between housing and pedestrian/bike/transit connections • There is an opportunity to build much deeper housing flexibility into this section, in conjunction with zoning code changes. For example, explicit allowance of micro lot platting and development; allowance of incremental housing and modular housing; etc. • The city’s full approval of duplex development without conditional review should be inserted into this section to show the larger priority behind that code change • There is an opportunity to insert language encouraging the City to take steps to encourage higher density housing development (such as purchasing and assembling vacant lots for development; creating a fund for subsidizing new housing construction; etc.) • There is an opportunity to explicitly support “green” housing development features such as renewable energy, energy efficiency, onsite water and food production, etc. • There is the threat of continued automobile dominant housing and neighborhoods due to the embedded language throughout this section. • There is a threat that this chapter will be incongruent or not matched sufficiently with the building and zoning codes that determine possible densities and green building improvements Appendix E Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis First Review: July 14th | 6 Land Use - Commercial- Chapter Key Objectives: Evaluate the Conservation chapter on how well it integrates climate change and resiliency. Identify additional opportunities and risks of integrating climate change in future iterations of the - Land Use - Commercial- chapter. Strengths Weaknesses • G-3E – Goal specifically mentions environmental goals alongside safety and compatibility when discussing commercial shopping • Goal 3F, emphasizing traditional downtown environment, is congruent with sustainable urban development – and could be expanded with specifics • P-3E.02 – Notion of separating pedestrian, bike, and vehicle traffic needs to be clarified to avoid the 20th century focus on separation of uses. Mixed use environments should be encouraged and pedestrian/bike areas need to be considered equal to traffic concerns • P-3E.03 – Pairing of shopping center location and traffic concerns should be eliminated. Traffic and roads do not need to be cited alongside commercial districts, especially because the possible locations of commercial development are already specified by the land use map Opportunities Threats • Emphasis on environmental goals alongside public safety and land use planning when discussing commercial shopping could be greatly clarified and expanded to reflect explicit climate change resiliency goals • Explicit mention of bicycle infrastructure, such as bike racks, could be paired with commercial development to improve multi- modal access • Much more specific mention of how higher density, diverse, multi-modal urban commercial environments are directly related to climate change resiliency (decreased transport/building emissions, decreased development of undeveloped natural areas, increased social cohesion and efficiencies) could be inserted • The main threat is that commercial land use regulations will continue to follow the suburban-inspired status quo from the 20th century Appendix E Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan SWOT Analysis | Combined Chapters 4/7/2021 | 7 Land Use - Industrial- Chapter Key Objectives: Evaluate the Conservation chapter on how well it integrates climate change and resiliency. Identify additional opportunities and risks of integrating climate change in future iterations of the - Land Use - Industrial- chapter. Strengths Weaknesses • Goal G-3H prioritizes the minimal impacts on the natural environment and effective use of the community’s natural resources • P-3H.03 mitigates nuisances and hazardous characteristics such as noise, air, water, odor, pollution • P-3H.04 does not permit petroleum, liquefied natural gas, and non-clean energy facilities outside heavy industrial use area • P-3H.07 considers the climate change impacts of new industrial activity or expansion before any approval • G-3I facilitates reuse of large vacant or isolated industrial areas no longer in operation • G-3H vague at defining “minimal impact on the natural environment” -no mention of impervious surfaces, waste collection, effects of increased energy use etc. • G-3I lacks additional policies on assessing levels of contamination and no standards on evaluating cleanup options on sites • G-3I no implementation plan/guidelines for ensuring successful reuse of vacant sites. • Overall no delineation between Industrial Land Usages Opportunities Threats • Collaborate with Washington State’s Department of Ecology’s Voluntary Cleanup Program (VCP) to facilitate industrial site cleanups • Define subgroups of Industrial uses (Industrial-Light, Industrial- Heavy, and Industrial-Transit) • Prioritize the public availability of environmental impacts of local industries • Industrial development can impede/promote community’s future fiscal viability and job growth • Anthropogenic land use presents rivalling challenges to biodiversity than climate change alone • Market realities threaten the availability of usable industrial land Appendix E Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan SWOT Analysis | Combined Chapters 4/7/2021 | 8 Land Use – Open Space- Chapter Key Objectives: Evaluate the Conservation chapter on how well it integrates climate change and resiliency. Identify additional opportunities and risks of integrating climate change in future iterations of the - Land Use – Open Space - chapter. Strengths Weaknesses • G-3J retains natural landscapes, preserves fish and wildlife habitats, and provides natural corridors connecting wildlife habitats • P-3J.01 Preserve unique or major physical features such as marine shorelines, bluffs, ravines, streams, wetlands, wildlife habitat and other environmentally sensitive areas • P-3J.02 Promotes the preservation of wildlife habitat • P-3J.03 Regulates access to natural areas open spaces so as to avoid degrading areas • G-3K no clear guidelines for successful open space development/ usage (e.g., only using indigenous plants/restricting invasive plant use in landscaping) • G-3J Without clear direction creating open space in the urban landscape can promote more non-places across the city hindering public use and health under the guise of a green landscape Opportunities Threats • Implement stormwater gardens in place of existing water management so water can be filtered naturally back into the ground • Activating and beautifying underutilized alleys (particularly downtown) to increase usable public space • Support/ Promote urban orchards in conjunction P-3J.04 to allow public access to fresh fruits and promote stewardship • Extend free wifi to applicable open spaces/ city parks as an incentive to promote the value and prevent the underutilization of urban nature areas • Resource protection, damage to sensitive areas are constant threats to the quality of open spaces • Stewardship of areas can decline without lasting partnerships and continued public education • Planning for climate change (more heat, stronger storms, droughts, etc.) will increase and threaten parks • Burden property owners/ city on maintaining upkeep of open spaces Appendix E Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan SWOT Analysis | Combined Chapters 4/7/2021 | 9 Transportation Chapter Key Objectives: Evaluate the Transportation chapter on how well it integrates climate change and resiliency. Identify additional opportunities and risks of integrating climate change in future iterations of the Transportation chapter. Strengths Weaknesses • There is a policy that specifically mentions development of low carbon impact transportation. o P-4A.04 • Policy P-4B.14 explicitly mentions climate change. • Even when climate change isn’t mentioned, there are many climate-relevant or adjacent vocabulary that suggests that climate resiliency is prioritized in this chapter. o P-4A.01 o P-4A.02 o P-4A.03 • None of the goals have explicit mention of climate change or climate resiliency. Opportunities Threats • Opportunities to promote alternate modes of transportation that directly affect climate change. • Identify ways to make pedestrian and bike travel safer, easier, and more pleasurable through routes that users want to take. o Connect pedestrian and bike paths from west side of town to east side of town and downtown. o Create paths away from traffic over Valley Creek and Tumwater Creek to connect Lincoln Park to waterfront. • If “climate change” or other similar vocabulary isn’t explicitly included, there is the risk that climate change and resiliency will be overlooked in the implementation of the Comp Plan. • Policy P-4B.09 is not consistent with the rest of the chapter because it describes requiring off street parking. This encourages driving by ensuring excess parking infrastructure increases vehicle use and traffic. Multi-modal transportation reduces need for parking. o Remove this policy. Appendix E Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan SWOT Analysis | Combined Chapters 4/7/2021 | 10 Utilities and Public Services Chapter Key Objectives: Evaluate the Conservation chapter on how well it integrates climate change and resiliency. Identify additional opportunities and risks of integrating climate change in future iterations of the Utilities and Public Services chapter. Strengths Weaknesses • Goals may be interpreted to include climate mitigation and adaptation. • Goals and policies support DEIJ considerations (eg P5A-01/04/05) • Transportation, energy, and energy efficiency are three areas where significant opportunities exist for climate mitigation while delivering economic (reduced energy and transport costs) and other environmental benefits (eg reduction in other criteria pollutants) to the citizens . All three are promoted under Goal G- 5D. • no explicit mention climate risk and resilience to guide actions. • weak language (eg. G5D-05 uses “promote”) around climate friendly interventions Opportunities Threats • the chapter would benefit from some language the encourages development of “Climate Smart” infrastructure. (example – amend P5D.09 to reflect “climate smart” infrastructure; • explicit language and guidance to account for climate risk and resilience opens the door to reorienting current and future investments and support for various programs – for example P5B- 02 city’s financial support could then be contingent upon also including climate considerations in the feasibility studies and investment plans. • use stronger language for including climate considerations in decision making- • Where no regrets actions are clear (eg. energy efficiency, public transport, etc) use strong language in the document to prioritize • The chapter would benefit from some language the encourages development of “Climate Smart” infrastructure. (example – amend P5D.09 to reflect “climate smart” infrastructure; • Explicit language and guidance to account for climate risk and resilience opens the door to reorienting current and future investments and support for various programs – for example P5B- 02 city’s financial support could then be contingent upon also including climate considerations in the feasibility studies and investment plans. • Use stronger language for including climate considerations in decision making- • Where no regrets actions are clear (eg. energy efficiency, public transport, etc) use strong language in the document to prioritize Appendix E Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis | Housing chapter First Review: March 24, 2021 | 11 Housing Chapter Key Objectives: Evaluate the Conservation chapter on how well it integrates climate change and resiliency. Identify additional opportunities and risks of integrating climate change in future iterations of the Housing chapter. Strengths Weaknesses • City has a housing fund that could be used for grants to pay for developer fees for desirable projects. • The comprehensive plan should address the city’s dedicated “affordable housing finances” even though there is money set aside for these purposes. • Tree canopy cover tied to individual city lots – could promote tree and landscape requirements, to encourage (and/or reward) more trees in our community. Trees are necessary because of their ecological benefits, and the quality of life and desirability of a community. • P-6A.01 Weakness in Definition: what is a “housing opportunity”. Tents and RVs are opportunities if one is underhoused or unhoused and there are no other choices. So, does housing opportunity include temporary, makeshift, low-barrier entry. • P-6A.03 Encourage retention and development of safe and attractive mobile home parks. Weakness: the size requirements (several acres) of the existing mobile home requirements leaves very little space in city where a new park can occur. • P-6A.05 “promote acceptance” is vague, and nonsense. Opportunities Threats • P-6A.03 The city could make a distinction between mobile homes and “tiny homes” (stick built, not on trailers) to allow for regular city lots to accommodate such a development (with adequate parking, and not overload sewer/water/power). A city lot could have several tiny homes. • P-6A.03 The city could allow for several attractive tiny homes on trailers to create a mini-mobile home park with hookups, and landscape requirements. • “target household limits” could address definitions for: low, medium, or high income and tie to AMI area median income. • City could address Elder housing, as that will be the largest growing segment of our city population – to make better decisions regarding housing stock and needs. • Language is not clear. P-6A.02 Residential in all non-industrial zones “in situations where a limited work/live environment is found to be compatible” does not address the Port’s use of a warehouse for high-density homeless Covid housing. In that instance, was not subordinate to the industrial use element, and intent of industrial was not maintained. This needs clarification. • P-6A.07 “consider the effect of impact fees” Fees are the greatest impact on development. City must find ways to partner with developers, not gouge them for fees. • P-6A.12 ‘green building’ while desirable, also raises costs to build. Just as the G-5D Goal says “utility services in an efficient and cost- effective manner” is vague and prohibitive. Whose viewpoint is considered? Aspirational Analysis of Chapter: • I am looking at the comprehensive plan Housing with the goals and policies supporting climate. Appendix E Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis | Housing chapter First Review: March 24, 2021 | 12 • One thing I would like to point out that is in May 2011 there was a tree canopy assessment done for the city by Davey Resource Group. At the time, they found that we had 27.3% canopy cover our city, but mostly in private (not public) areas, and oddly enough the RS7 had only 17.8% canopy, which was lower than RHD at 18.9%. High density housing had better tree canopy, than our most common residential lots. • Since 2011 we have lost a LOT MORE canopy... besides our city cutting trees (Peabody, the big Sequoia dubbed "hope", the trees at Lincoln Park, 2016 removing all 38 downtown trees, etc) we have lost a great number of trees from private city lots, and with development projects that never had any standards on what kind of canopy cover should exist. We even lost the famous Madrona because of sidewalk and road changes which disrupted the root systems. • I don't even know if current redesign goals for arterials include trees. (But I know that from improper pruning we have had great tree loss on the greenbelts). In 2018, we developed a "tree board' to try and get an Arbor Day classification for TreeCityUSA, something I have heard nothing about over the last four years. In 2019, it was reported in the PDN that the tree board was disbanded. • We have a lip-service ordinance that is mostly for electric service street tree pruning. • Our tree ordinance, is MOSTLY about city owned trees, however I have NOT seen the reality of "13.010(2) When street tree(s) are removed, trees greater than six inches in diameter at breast height whall be replaced at a ratio of two new trees per removed tree, all trees less than six inches in diameter shall be replaced at a ratio of one new tree per removed tree." • And, for things like the tree fund at Lincoln Park, all funds were diverted to Civic Field (loudspeaker system) and, I do not know where the "Community Forester Fund" exists. Our ordinance also makes note of a "community forrester" to be appointed by city manager but, does this exist? • We have lost too many trees... • At 2011 levels our canopy cover is comparable to current Seattle (28%) canopy but THEY have a goal of increasing their canopy to 30% by 2037. • We have no such goal anywhere in the Comprehensive Plan. • Through the natural process of photosynthesis, trees absorb CO2 and other pollutant particulates, then store the carbon and emit pure oxygen. It is a simple concept that could go far to not only make our community more attractive, but, also, fight climate change. Trees also increase a neighborhood's "desirability" but offer other tangible benefits. • The 2011 Davey Resource Group conclusion recommended increasing our tree canopy to 47.9%. • Taking into consideration that the City of Port Angeles includes 2,453 surface acres of open water, mostly in the harbor, the assessment found an overall average tree canopy cover of 27.3% over land areas. Rough estimatesof potential planting areassuggest that Port Angeles may be able to support an overall tree canopy cover of 47.9%.Establishing policies now that conserveand increase the overall net canopy and thebenefit stream from this important resource will ensure that it is preserved for current residentsand wildlifeas well as for future generations. • They identified goals that were recommended to the City of Port Angeles a decade ago. These goals,still desirable today, were: Appendix E Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis | Housing chapter First Review: March 24, 2021 | 13 • Preserve and expand overall net canopy. Considering that Port Angeles' current overall canopy cover is 27.3% (excluding areas of surface water) and the general recommendation for communities in the Pacific Northwest is 40% (American Forests), preserving the current overall net canopy cover is important. • • Protect existing trees where possible, maximize the stocking level for street trees, and increase canopy in parks and open spaces.Set canopy goals. Canopy goals can be broad based, or specific to land use. When determining canopy goals, consider the importance of trees and forests to meeting the environmental and quality of life goals of the community. Ideally, tree canopy goals should be adopted as a component of the Urban Forest Master Plan along with the City's Comprehensive Plan. • Promote trees and tree canopy as an efficient solution to stormwater management. Integrate current and evolving design standards that reduce stormwater runoff and support urban tree growth, including pervious pavement, suspended pavement, linear tree pits, and forested bioswales. • Augment tree canopy cover to maximize the capture and reuse of stormwater management areas, thereby reducing runoff and pollution into surface waters and the Strait. • Promote community outreach. Develop materials, presentations, and press releases that promote the importance and value of trees and canopy to the community, especially for reducing wind velocity and stormwater management. • Consider providing an annual report to detail the state of the urban forest, including canopy loss and/or gain. Identify areas for new tree planting. Identify locations where forestlands compliment community design and scenic views. • Increase new tree planting to replace canopy lost to development or redesign. • Encourage and facilitate partnerships and collaborations. Work with developers and homeowner associations to identify and preserve conservation areas and potential forest tracts. Promote clustered developments, preservation of existing trees and tree planting projects that compliment views, while reducing wind velocity and providing opportunities for passive recreation. Collaborate with volunteer groups to assist with Tree planting projects. • Tree ordinances are just starting to show up across the country. A tree ordinance establishes authorization and standards for addressing a wide range of issues regarding trees. They should be developed and implemented as part of a broader effort to identify and address a community’s tree-related goals. • full Davey report: ftp://ftp.austintexas.gov/GIS- Data/Community_Forestry/Alan_Halter/H/Accuracy_Assessment_Canopy2010/References/Port%20Angeles%20accuracy%20assessmen t.pdf • USFS report about importance of tree canopy: https://www.fs.fed.us/nrs/pubs/jrnl/2018/nrs_2018_nowak_005.pdf • Guidelines for developing tree ordinances: https://conservationtools.org/library_items/597 • There are also resources on how to develop a community tree inventory. Appendix E Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis | Housing chapter First Review: March 24, 2021 | 14 Conservation Chapter Key Objectives: Evaluate the Conservation chapter on how well it integrates climate change and resiliency. Identify additional opportunities and risks of integrating climate change in future iterations of the Conservation chapter. Strengths Weaknesses • Place-based development in harmony with local environment is important for resilience (7A.01, 7A.02, 7A.03) • Reference to climate change in numerous plan elements (7A.10, etc.) • Focus on conservation of wetlands, riparian areas, and other natural areas, along with explicit support for tree cover, is in line with climate change mitigation • Reference to reducing greenhouse gas emissions (7B.18, 7B.19) • Explicit focus on community education surrounding environmental resources is a direct endorsement of community organizing for climate change mitigation (7C) • Vague statements are hard to implement with concrete policy measures (7A.04 – “natural constraints” is not defined) • Policies that have already been implemented should be removed or revised to reflect future goals (7A.05 – minimum development standards; 7A.06) • The overall number of policies should be reduced through combination or elimination to make future goals and policies more clear and simple for policymakers – there are many redundancies (ex – 7B.01 and 7B.03) • Reference to regulations impacting policies should include links to exact sections of municipal code, for reference and review (ex – 7B.07 has been enacted through stormwater investments – these should be linked so that progress in area is known; 7D – should link to Shoreline Master Plan and should avoid redundancy) • References to climate change are often indirect and not clear about the distinct causes and effects of climate change (ex – 7B.06) Opportunities Threats • There is an opportunity to streamline the number of goals and policies to make the entire document most easily understandable without sacrificing the content of policies suggested • Explicit mention of both climate change adaptation and climate change mitigation could be included to link together the importance of different policies (such as policies suggesting riparian conservation and policies suggesting shoreline conservation) in a larger climate framework • Too many goals/policies, including many which are redundant, threaten to confuse policymakers and citizens when trying to apply the plan • Unclear definitions of key terms, and vague reference to “climate change”, threatens a lack of coordination among community members in addressing issues • More explicit mention of development goals than climate change goals could lead to prioritization of development over conservation. Appendix E Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis | Housing chapter First Review: March 24, 2021 | 15 • There is an opportunity to make the linkages between the plan’s goals/policies and the underlying laws/legal standards that impact them (municipal code, state law, federal law, etc.) much more clear and easily accessible, creating a single resource to be used by policymakers and citizens where all relevant information is included in one place alongside recommended policies and actions • Lack of envisioning possible futures – such as drastic sea level rise, drought and water scarcity, climate migration amid housing shortage – in explicit terms in the plan threatens to leave the city unprepared for the larger variety of future possibilities under a changing climate. Appendix E Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis | Capital Facilities First Review: March 24, 2021 | 16 Capital Facilities - Chapter 8 Key Objectives: Evaluate the Conservation chapter on how well it integrates climate change and resiliency. Identify additional opportunities and risks of integrating climate change in future iterations of the Capital Facilities chapter. Strengths Weaknesses • Multiple Policies directly and indirectly relate to climate resiliency. • The chapter references several other Plans, Programs, Documents, Policies, and Acts that directly and indirectly relate to climate resiliency. (County-Wide Planning Policy, State Growth Management Act, Capital Facilities Plan, Parks and Recreation Plan, Urban Forestry Program) • The chapter directly states a goal of "consider[ing] projected climate change impacts and adaptation strategies to determine whether adequate services can be provided into the future, prior to approving any development." P-8A.22 • The chapter directly references developing Green Infrastructure and Low Impact Development P-8D.02 • Multiple policies could easily have a climate resiliency component, but it's not mentioned. • Goal G-8B is focused on streets and utilities. With the exception of one policy referencing stormwater run-off, nothing is related to climate resiliency. Opportunities Threats • Add a reference to climate resiliency where applicable to current goals and policies when not already directly referenced. Example: P-8D.02 The City should invest in Green Infrastructure, Low Impact Development (LID), and similar technologies to maintain and enhance environmental quality and climate resiliency. • Several goals and policies referencing working and cooperating with other agencies (School district, the State, the County, and others). However, the other agencies may have different or nonexistent climate change and resiliency plans making it more difficult to cooperate. • No matter how inclusive or thorough climate resiliency objectives are integrated into the Comp Plan, it's up to the City Council to implement them. Different Council members have different focuses. Goals and Policies Supporting Climate Resiliency: • P-8A.11 Adopt a Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Plan consistent with the Comprehensive Plan and the Growth Management Act as an Element of the Comprehensive Plan. Appendix E Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan Planning Commission SWOT Analysis | Capital Facilities First Review: March 24, 2021 | 17 • P-8A.12 Require should use permeable materials where feasible. • P-8A.13 Develop and implement an Urban Forestry Program. • P-8A.15 Consider climatic change impacts and adaptation strategies in planning and designing capital facilities. • P-8A.17 Deny any development that will not be served at or greater than a citywide level of service standard of 10 acres of parks per 1,000 population within six years from the time of development. • P-8B.09 Develop a Capital Facilities Plan list, with public input, for prioritizing pedestrian walkway needs. • G-8D To reduce the amount of impervious surface created by new developments and thereby reduce stormwater management costs and environmental impacts to the City and its natural resources, reduce development costs to private property owners, and provide safe and more attractive streets through traffic calming, safe pedestrian amenities, and improved street edge landscaping. • P-8D.02 The City should invest in Green Infrastructure, Low Impact Development (LID), and similar technologies to maintain and enhance environmental quality. Appendix E Port Angeles Climate Resiliency Plan SWOT Analysis | Parks and Recreation chapter 4/7/2021 | 18 Parks and Recreation – Chapter 10 Key Objectives: Evaluate the Parks and Recreation chapter on how well it integrates climate change and resiliency. Identify additional opportunities and risks of integrating climate change in future iterations of the Parks and Recreation chapter. Strengths Weaknesses • Parks and Recreation promotes outdoor engagement. More outdoor use heightens people’s sensitivity to climate change. o Promoting walking and biking has potential to reduce vehicle use. • One policy reflects climate change goals: o P-10D.01 • There is no explicit wording related to climate change in this chapter. • No examples of resiliency Opportunities Threats • There are opportunities to increase park use and enjoyment as climate changes: o Increase sheltering like overhangs and trees if precipitation increases. o Increase sheltering like overhangs and trees if precipitation decreases. o Re-enforce shoreline to protect against rising sea levels • Allow rain gardens where appropriate land exists. Streets create huge amounts of run off. City could use its assets to its advantage. Parks are not typically in use when it is raining anyway. Bring in more birds to parks. Small depressions on edges of parks can provide more attractive features with native vegetation. • Parks and Recreation is concerned with the interaction of individuals with the outdoor environment. Climate change directly impacts this. • If “climate change” or other similar vocabulary isn’t explicitly included, there is the risk that climate change and resiliency will be overlooked in the implementation of the Comp Plan. Appendix E 1 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Public Workshop 1 Summary November 17th | 6:00 - 8:00 PM Recording available here Table of Contents Table of Contents .................................................................................................................................................. 1 Objectives ............................................................................................................................................................. 1 Agenda .................................................................................................................................................................. 1 Demographics Poll .............................................................................................................................................. 19 Presentation Slides ............................................................................................................................................. 21 Objectives  Provide an overview of the Climate Resiliency Plan process to date, including information on the City’s greenhouse gas emissions.  Develop a community vision that guides and grounds this plan.  Gather public input to guide the development of the Climate Resiliency’s Plan draft strategies and actions. Identify and connect how climate resilience also leads to other co-benefits. Agenda Time Agenda 6:00 – 6:05 Welcome 6:05 – 6:30 Climate Resiliency Plan Overview Presentation 6:05 – 6:20 Climate Resiliency Plan Overview 6:20 – 6:30 Q&A Discussion 6:30 – 6:55 Community Vision Discussion – Vision for a Climate Resiliency Plan 6:55 – 7:55 Climate Resiliency Priority Discussion 6:55 – 7:07 Sector #1 Transportation 7:07 – 7:19 Sector #2 Buildings & Energy 7:19 – 7:31 Sector #3 Ecosystem Health 7:31 – 7:43 Sector #4 Consumption & Waste 7:43 – 7:55 Sector #5 Community Resilience & Wellbeing 7:55 – 8:00 Workshop Conclusion Next Steps  Overview of how input will be used and next steps in the process  Concluding demographics poll  Thank you and contact information Appendix F 2 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Welcome Ben Stanley and Mike Chang kicked off the meeting. Ben Stanley gave a brief description of the City’s two-year long Climate Action Planning process, introducing this workshop as an initial step of the public engagement effort within that larger process. Mike introduced opportunities to participate in the public survey and goes over Zoom house-keeping rules. Climate Resiliency Plan Overview Presentation Introductions Mike introduced the Poll Everywhere platform that will be used throughout the workshop to capture participant feedback. He also reminds participants to submit feedback through the Zoom chat if they have issues with Poll Everywhere. Mike prompted the 27 public participants in attendance to introduce themselves using the Poll Everywhere platform or Zoom chat. Responses are provided in the table below. Table 1. Introduce yourself: name, organization/affiliation. Responses Susannah Spock resident and Futurewise Nathan West - City of Port Angeles Ben Braudrick, City of Port Angeles Associate Planner and Project Manager Pat Nachreiner, retired resident interested in Climate resiliency Hi. Tony Billera. Recently moved here from Whidbey. Volunteer w CAPG Carole, PA resident Caroline Walls, West Port Angeles Resident. Habitat Biologist for a local Tribe. Helen Amerongen and Dave Piper, Port Angeles residents Emeritus from the Exploratorium in San Francisco- living in PA Melanie Greer, WSU Extension, on Clallam Co Climate Advisory Committee Betsy, clallam Democrats Angi Klahn - Clallam County - Climate Advisory Committee Ian Nickel, resident of Port Angeles, volunteer with Climate Action Planning Group. Emma Bolin, Community Development Manager with City of Port Angeles Karen Hanan, Director, ArtsWA (WA State Arts Commission) but also a PA resident when not working in Olympia Ben Stanley, Vice Chair, City of PA Planning Commission Don Zanon, retired Bob Vreeland, P.A. resident, CAP member Nathan, new Port Angeles resident Appendix F 3 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Next, Mike prompted participants to share what groups they believe are not represented at this workshop. Table 2. What groups (organizations, students, etc.) not represented today? Who’s not in the room? Responses probably everyone whose homes were flooded this week... Fishing folks Chamber of commerce County people without internet People working in service industries like retail and food service. Small business owners Schools? Industry? Logging? Representative from Port of Port Angeles school admin, National Park Service, Clallam Emergency Operations Center representative, Port, Clallam Transit BIPOC community members non-environmentalists Tribal members Peninsula community college students, youth Tribal members Representative from Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe Plan Overview Ben Braudrick provides a detailed overview of the resiliency Plan process, including foundational elements that have shaped the development of the Plan and its intended outcomes (slide 8). He goes onto highlight key dates and milestones in the history of the City’s climate action planning process (slide 9) and wraps up with a few important next steps (slide 10):  2022 Coordination: Resiliency Plan will be incorporated by reference into the Comprehensive Plan after adoption  2025 Coordination: Comprehensive Plan update will include direct references to recommendations and guidance from the Plan Emma Bolin walks through examples of climate impacts experienced in Port Angeles today, including atmospheric river conditions and extreme flooding, heat dome events, and wildfire smoke (slide 12). Concluding the Plan overview section of the presentation, Mike covers multiple slides detailing City climate action progress to date and where the Plan is headed (slides 13 to 18). Q&A The presenters kicked off a brief Q&A segment by reading questions from the Zoom chat and providing answers in real-time. Appendix F 4 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Question Response How does the PA emission rate compare to other like sized cities? Half national average, but twice the international average. If international rates are lower, what can we learn? • Goods and service transit • The way we build our structures • The waste we create How much of the climate resilience does GHG emissions represent? • GHG represents strong impact on resilience • Changing our transportation: local food supplies • The more you reduce your carbon footprint, the more you see resilience improve How many people lost power? • Extreme events cause stress on aging systems • Internet and electricity loss • Lowering emissions raise resilience of system Impact of controlled green waste burns? • Learn what to next time, where to focus efforts, and obtain information • How do we get information locally? • Legality questionable in city • Survey can help us understand how to do controlled burns • Used in carbon output potentially Where do fireplaces burning wood fit in? • Difficult to quantify, we don’t know how many people have fireplaces; a survey would be beneficial • Indoor air quality tied to health resilience • Things will intersect with other sectors (health, transit, etc.) Community Vision Discussion – Vision for a Climate Resiliency Plan Using three Poll Everywhere questions, Mike prompted the 30 public participants in attendance to think about what a climate resilient future means to them. Question 1: How has climate change affected you personally or people in your community? Participant responses included the following topics (see Table 3 for complete responses)  Climate refugees  Climate grief  Accessibility  Smoke, heat, flooding, wildfire  Children’s future  Despair  Less Rainfall  Loss of Species  Job loss  Disaster victims Table 3. How has climate change affected you personally or people in your community? Appendix F 5 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Responses I need air conditioning now Wildfire smoke traps us inside in the summer... But none of our homes have A/C! Had to start sleeping in the basement in the summer Less stream flow for salmon Concern for people who cannot recover after loss from climate disasters. Job loss Loss of species We are climate migrants- moved here from Portland due to air pollution, health issues. Now worried about drought, heat, traffic, health of forest Increased temperatures rqd AC system, less rainfall read more water in garden at cost Wildfire smoke has impacted not just summer outdoor recreational activities for everyone, but especially impacted people with respiratory problems Climate Grief- despair looking at the damage to the trees after the heat dome Anyone with kids knows that their future is imperiled, which pains us all on their behalf Flooding streets and wildfire smoke Flooding, smoke, excessive heat Accessibility issues Gray hair and wrinkles from heightened emergency operations Climate grief- fear of the future I am a climate change refugee Question 2: What do you love about Port Angeles? Participant responses included the following topics (see Table 4 for complete responses)  Increase walkability; Sidewalks and bike lanes  Great vibrant community downtown  Revitalization  Shelter for homeless  Beauty and natural landscape  National Park  Protection of environment  Arts and Culture  Microgrids  Scale of town  Better public transit schedules  People who commute  Better managed tourism  Combating fake news  Facilitate public action Table 4. What do you love about Port Angeles? Appendix F 6 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Responses Combat fake news that tells people that climate change is not real Improvement to better manage tourism, such as bus service to hurricane ridge from downtown Better public transportation schedule! Shuttle to La Push doesn't match up with Bus from Forks. There are tons of Coast Guard and Tribal employees that live in Port Angeles, but the bus system schedule doesn't allow us to us public transport. So we all drive separately Save our beautiful trees. I love the scale of town, and walking and biking in town, but agree that making that easier would be ideal Love natural beauty, access to nature (forests, oceans) need to conserve water in summer, reduce traffic, have solar micro grid for emergencies, help with insulation, more trees in city Trees, mountains & the strait - what's not to love. Increase walkability and mass trans. Use the arts to tell the story more powerfully More housing diversity, including apartments and walkable neighborhoods The surrounding national park environment is amazing and so beautiful. To honor that, we need to do everything we can to protect what we love about this place through bold action I love that left or right, everyone appreciates and loves the landscape here. I would like to see us capture water through slowing down the flood zones on public land through swales on public lands between Lincoln Park and Shane Park The natural environment. I would like to see invasive species removed from our water ways, and more rain gardens to help clean pollution out of our storm water systems More shelters for people who are homeless and cannot escape the bad weather. Love the natural beauty, the town, the people; would like to see broader recycling options The natural environment. Reduce impervious pavement and improve walkability Vibrant community. Great downtown, shops and restaurants, waterfront. Access to water. Bike trails. I 'd like to see more bike lanes and safer cross town biking so i could bike to work Increase walkability - right now it's almost impossible to live here without a car. Port Angeles is great for experiencing the outdoors in everyday life, but more sidewalks and bike lanes would help Increased density, better systems for car free living More low impact development, green building, innovation with stormwater management Question 3: Now, complete this thought/sentence: In 2030, I want Port Angeles to be_________. Participant responses included the following topics (see Table 5 for complete responses)  United Climate resilience  Carbon neutral  Electric busses for school  Net-zero energy  Known for health environment  Resilient to outages  Adaptable to city move  Walkable  Inclusive Appendix F 7 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan  More localized food production  Family opportunity and sense of community  Affordable and good looking Table 5. Now, complete this thought/sentence: In 2030, I want Port Angeles to be: Responses A forward thinking community that is doing all it can to inform it's citizens about the possible consequences of climate change and the many preparations it is making to prepare. A thriving community that provides families with opportunity and a sense of community and safety, that is affordable and forward-looking Moving away from the logging industry More walkable More local food I want Port Angeles to be more inclusive, less paved, more walkable and accessible for non-drivers Fully walkable with sidewalks everywhere that are a softer material than concrete. A electric train that runs parallel to 101 Laser focused on preserving its natural environment to the benefit of current and future residents both human and animal The greenest city on the peninsula, vibrant, revitalized, supporting local farms and jobs, shuttles to parks More salmon! More prepared to handle the influx of urban weekenders the flee the hot city in the summer Energy independent and resilient to power outages Known for its healthy environment Net zero energy A vibrant and healthy place to live. Exponentially grow my pedometer steps! Using electric buses for transit and schools. Carbon neutral United for climate resiliency Climate Resiliency Priority Discussion The climate resilience priority portion of the workshop is broken out into smaller discussions by climate action sector:  Community Resilience & Wellbeing  Ecosystem Health  Transportation  Buildings & Energy  Consumption & Waste Appendix F 8 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Presenters asked participants to share reactions to high-level strategy areas for each focus area and respond to and brainstorm specific actions that can help implement strategies by answering the following questions:  Do these strategies align with your vision? What might be missing or how would you change it?  What are your initial reactions to these actions? What would you add or change? What do you support? Community Resilience & Wellbeing Mike opens this focus area discussion by presenting two main strategies and corresponding actions, as shown in the table below. Strategies Example Actions Prepare PA for future extreme events • Update municipal codes to account for enhanced fire risk in the wildland- urban interface. • Create community resiliency hubs to support residents during extreme events, such as wildfire smoke days or heat waves, by providing shelter, air conditioning, clean indoor air, and other supplies. Increase community capacity to address climate change • Conduct a sea level rise vulnerability assessment to evaluate vulnerability of City assets, including roads, sewage treatment, buildings, water infrastructure, and ports. • Develop a city-wide carbon pricing program and invest revenue into energy efficiency and clean energy projects. Using the Zoom chat and Poll Everywhere platform, participants provided feedback on how these strategies aligned with their vision and what might be missing or needing change. Some reactions to these strategies include (see Table 6 for complete responses):  Mental health care and climate trauma  Economic growth and opportunity  Food security  Resilient housing and Jobs  Homeowner water collection Table 6. Community Resilience & Wellbeing: Do these strategies align with your vision? What might be missing or how would you change it? Responses Allow water collection by homeowners, for use in times of drought Allow water collection on homeowner prop Provide incentives for solar power installation We need to avoid getting mired in the current political polarization that gets in the way of honest action Appendix F 9 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Responses I feel like more is missing than is here.... Clarify the problems, communicate them well..... And specifically. Create incentives.. Free composting toilets for folx in the hills. Better cleaner fuel for wood stoves... Free rain barrels, and housing density incentives Yes. We should aim to make our climate preparation an opportunity to advance the economic and social health of the community too (like resilient housing) Focus on reducing our contributions to the problem Food security Mental health care to help people with climate trauma. Good strategies but concerned about Cost of our electricity- due to climate change Bonneville power costs will rise, so more emphasis on developing local renewable energy Need to connect housing, jobs, and the economy Yes. Centering a strategy around Net Ecological Gain Participants offered initial reactions to actions and suggestions for additional actions, changes, or areas of prioritization. Some high-level themes from the responses are below (see Table 7 for complete responses)  General support for these strategies and actions, but do they go far enough?  Need programs to support weatherization/insulation for homes; prioritize vulnerable groups  Improve stormwater and septic systems  More emphasis on urban flooding, as opposed to wildfire risk Table 7. Community resilience & Wellbeing: What are your initial reactions to these actions? What would you add or change? What do you support? Responses New construction plans must take into account Climate change. Start monitoring and regulating well water use Update sewage system so that it doesnt flood the harbor Energy efficiency auditing for homes needs to be available Solar micro grid system so not reliant on grid in emergency Restore more river floodplains. When a river has access to its whole floodplain, it reduces winter floods and increase groundwater Contractor support and subsidies. Insulation is impossible for many folx with old wiring and no one available in the area Begin to replace electrical infrastructure to eventually support a local micro grid with electric vehicle to grid power sharing Reduce other stressors on the natural environment Get ecology and Rayonnier to complete the FULL cleanup of the old mill site Explore using street lighting pole power for slow speed EV charging Emphasize jobs created to capture rain, get homes more insulated, make PA greener- more trees- fir summer shade and beauty Upgrade culverts! I support, would add that positive rewards, reinforcements fir "doing the right thing" Appendix F 10 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Responses Program to make updating windows and insulation affordable Create a locally tailored response Even a micro-locally tailored response Support but maybe they should include hubs or resources for non-emergency climate events. Overall I am in support. I think that things like vulnerability assessments are useful to prioritize our effort within the city's existing planning programs - Would a carbon price be used to help the person who is charge reduce their emissions? Good Start. Update infrastructure to better handle the climate changes I support strategy 1 actions. Strategy 2 actions both might be a little too involved for a city our size. For example, our community might not have the financial strength to implement carbon pricing at this time Support those actions. Would add exploring deploying solar energy on public buildings and park structures. More emphasis on urban flooding with more intense storms. Less emphasis on wildfire risk. Outfalls are more at risk with sea level rise. Add improving stormwater system, and fixing septic systems to keep fish happy in Salish Sea Develop a city-wide carbon pricing program and invest revenue into energy efficiency and clean energy projects. Develop program to help residents capture winter rain for summer use! Conduct a sea level rise vulnerability assessment to evaluate vulnerability of City assets, including roads, sewage treatment, buildings, water infrastructure, and ports. I support them but do they go far enough? Using various funds from organizations to help the most vulnerable citizens Ecosystem Health Mike opens this focus area discussion by presenting two main strategies and corresponding actions, as shown in the table below: Strategies Example Actions Restore and protect shoreline, aquatic, and forest habitat. • Protect urban tree canopy • Incorporate climate change and sea level rise explicitly into the Shoreline Master Program. Increase opportunities for carbon sequestration and storage. • Encourage timber companies to extend timber harvest rotation times, as longer aged trees can sequester more carbon. • Partner with organizations (e.g., National Park Services, National Marine Sanctuary) to preserve forest and marine habitats. Using the Zoom chat and Poll Everywhere platform, participants provided feedback on how these strategies aligned with their vision and what might be missing or needing change. Some reactions to these strategies include (see Table 8 for complete responses).  General alignment with participants’ vision  Strategy 1 needs to align with the port economic development plan, which impacts salmon streams  Strategy 2 needs to scale globally to be effective and we don't have control over that Appendix F 11 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan  Logging industry needs to be more sustainable  Ecosystem and habitat protection and restoration efforts should be coordinated with Clallam County. Table 8. Ecosystem Health: Do these strategies align with your vision? What might be missing or how would you change it? Responses City wide composting Increase native vegetation. Less grass. All ecosystem actions must be coordinated with Clallam County since ecosystems don't respect city boundaries You've got to dig a lot deeper. There's a ton missing here. We need to build soil, control erosion, and slow water flow. Acceleration of the existing process to mitigate superfund pollution in PA harbor Incentives for development with more green space and trees. Less concrete! Reducing food waste Strategy 1 is good but needs to aligned with Port economic development plans that impact salmon streams Yes they align - need greenspace plan, support for farms using regenerative farming Sewer upgrades so doesn't dump into water. Daylight peabody creek, increase rain gardens I tend to like strategy 1, oriented towards local adaptation and with multiple benefits. Strategy 2 is one of those things that we could put a lot of effort into locally, but its something that needs to scale globally to be effective...and we don't have control over that We have to address the huge gap between what is necessary in terms of the spend in investing in net-zero resilience and what is currently happening Should emphasize that ecosystem health will need to be balanced with logging concerns in this community. How do we make logging more sustainable? Improve recycling / upcycling opportunities There's a lot of focus on habitat - would be good to think about salmon and other wildlife Participants offered initial reactions to actions and suggestions for additional actions, changes, or areas of prioritization (see Table 9 for complete responses).  Emphasis on floodplain and riparian habitat restoration  Improved invasive species control efforts  Increased urban tree canopy and natural vegetation (lawn removal) Table 9. Ecosystem Health: What are your initial reactions to these actions? What would you add or change? What do you support? Responses Invasive weed efforts! Need huge crews out there to deal with the problems. Invasive weeds like scotch broom and reed canary grass prevent native riparian growth and suck up our water Free compost!! Enforce compliance of whatever measures are decided upon Rows of trees between car lanes and bike and walk lanes Appendix F 12 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Responses I am in support. Specifically: I would like more legislation regarding both the cutting of trees, having street trees, and using native plants in City infrastructure. I would also like to see more focus on the climate's impact on City infrastructure. Support. Large scale invasive species removal program (hire several Washington Conservation Corps. Crews?) Incentivize homeowners to transitions grass lawns to ecologically diverse habitats. Remove pollution from streams by installing rain gardens across the city I feel that the marginal benefits from things like sequestration through, for example, increasing rotation timing pales with the ecosystem benefits we gain from making space along the coast, which will reduce risk and enhance habitat functions and processes We lost five trees on my block this summer. It's a city with a view that comes at a cost Existing in-town tree canopy is weak - it is more about encouraging tree planting, such as in planting strips around town. This could also help absorb flood water, absorb pollution, decrease energy use, and even increase food production Restore floodplains Work with Tribes to allow cultural and traditional forest burning practices for healthier forests Reduce logging on State lands, daylighting and restoration of urban streams, incentives to maintain native vegetation Floodplain and riparian habitat restoration Many blocks in PA don't have trees- so need to plant more Transportation Mike opens this focus area discussion by presenting two main strategies and corresponding actions, as shown in the table below. Strategies Example Actions Enhance transportation resilience by promoting public transit and active transportation. • Ensure that all residents have access to multiple transportation options, especially walking, biking, and public transit. • Ensure that the City’s transportation systems and investments can withstand future climate impacts. Reduce transportation related GHG emissions. • Expand public transit infrastructure and services to decrease need for single-occupancy cars. • Expand electric vehicle (EV) infrastructure and incentivize people to purchase EVs. Using the Zoom chat and Poll Everywhere platform, participants provided feedback on how these strategies aligned with their vision and what might be missing or needing change. Some reactions to these strategies include (see Table 10 for complete responses).  Improve, promote, and incentivize public transit and multi-modal transit  Connect public transit to 1-5 corridor, city centers, and park trailheads  Increase electrical vehicle charging stations  Improve WIFI connectivity to enable less work commutes Appendix F 13 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Table 10. Transportation: Do these strategies align with your vision? What might be missing or how would you change it? Responses Supporting more dense housing downtown would improve transportation resilience (less needed) while also helping our housing crisis and improving the economy Include EV charging access for new multiunit housing Rewards for those using public transportation, electric cars, and bicycles. Bike repair stations throughout town Overall I like this - given that most of our emissions are transportation oriented. However perhaps there should be consideration for strategies focused on things like business development, internet development such that people don't need to travel as far to reach the services they need Good but they need to include strategies to improve walkability and accessibility. Design the system with non- drivers in mind The city needs to really embrace multi-modal transportation, including significantly better public transit (more frequent and more stops), free usage, and better pedestrian and bike infrastructure, Need to focus on 10-minute communities - public transportation and walking/biking can't be done without updating housing codes Pedestrian only zones, ev stations Sorry $1.50 from PA to Forks Let's emphasize that decreasing transportation emissions (unlike buildings) also involves decreasing toxic emissions released alongside carbon. And involves energy and cost savings Public transit to national park trail heads Ferry to Seattle Clallam has a great, cheap system. 1.50 to F Hooray! But need to account for summer tourism & traffic jams up to Hurricane ridge- love our tourist but they bring pollution More charging stations for electric vehicles. Electric tram lines through town. Makes roads less hospitable to cars Add language that includes connection to public health Don't just promote public transit, IMPROVE it. Make it work for the residents Develop the possibility for rail travel hooked into the I-5 corridor coming rail lines Participants offered initial reactions to actions and suggestions for additional actions, changes, or areas of prioritization (see Table 11 for complete responses).  Improve walkability of the city, including more sidewalk connectivity and better design for mobility-impaired persons  Update public transit schedule that fits commuter needs  Improve bikability, including safer bike lanes, more bike racks and locks, and free repair stations Table 11. Transportation: What are your initial reactions to these actions? What would you add or change? What do you support? Appendix F 14 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Responses Provide more aesthetically pleasing walking experience More sidewalks Electric vehicle stations, community cycling program, pedestrian only downtown, ban trucks from downtown Have the city pay for more sidewalks and curb cuts for our less mobile citizens and visitors Safer feeling for pedestrians/bikes, feeling of equity Challenge engineers, mechanic, and students to find ways to replace gas engines with electric engines in RV's, trucks, and commercial vehicles. More fully separated, two way bike lanes Need shuttles for the summer tourists Make the public transit schedule work for commuters! The La Push shuttle schedule does not match up with the Forks bus schedule. Commuters have to sit at the forks transit center for an hour or more between the two. So we just drive instead. This is also a social justice issue because the Tribe has trouble retaining high quality employees that commute. Support. Would like to see a more walkable downtown (less vehicles), and safer bike lanes. For bikes, more bike locks downtown, and bike lockers as well. Specifically bike locks that fit the tires of E-bikes. Install EV charging stations that would eventually support bi-directional charging - allowing vehicles to be a backup power source for community Update bike racks on busses for bikes with varying wheel sizes (e-bikes usually have larger tires) Good but should be designing with non-drivers in mind not only trying build around electric vehicle use. Improve accessibility, pedestrian safety, and sidewalk condition and connectivity Should work with ferries on decreasing their emissions Supporting more dense housing downtown would improve transportation resilience (less needed) while also helping our housing crisis and improving the economy Love it! It would be great to make golf carts street legal. Love the light pole idea. Free bike repair stations Prime the City for ridesharing Electric mass transit system. Need to deal with tourism traffic in the summer. Incentives for businesses to use evs too Every light pole could provide 120v power for EV charging Public transport options good enough to attract car free tourists. Ecotourism Buildings & Energy Mike opens this focus area discussion by presenting two main strategies and corresponding action, as shown int eh table below: Strategies Example Actions Support energy resilience by investing in renewable • Invest in projects that develop community energy projects to ensure there is energy supply redundancy, especially when the City (or various neighborhoods) lose power. Appendix F 15 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Strategies Example Actions energy and community-scale energy projects. • Realign and protect infrastructure along bluff crests against sea level rise. Reduce building-related GHG emissions. • Incentivize propane use reduction. • Support or mandate energy efficient retrofits, such as building weatherization and energy efficient appliances. Using the Zoom chat and Poll Everywhere platform, participants provided feedback on how these strategies aligned with their vision and what might be missing or needing change. Some reactions to these strategies include (see Table 12 for complete responses).  Should focus money on transportation emissions (highest source)  Need incentives and grants for increasing energy efficiency of existing buildings/homes and making new buildings/homes GHG neutral.  Emphasis on working with large industrial and commercial businesses (e.g., Westport) to reduce emissions.  Increase availability and affordability of alternative energy sources like wind and solar. Table 12. Buildings & Energy: Do these strategies align with your vision? What might be missing or how would you change it? Responses Building Efficiency = Transportation efficiency Let's focus the money we have on transportation, that pie chart Support. Encourage buildings owned by the City to reduce GHG emissions/install solar. But also work with EDC and/or Chamber to help businesses in the community to reduce their emissions. Work with places like Westport and the marine industries to employ strategies to reduce their impacts on our environment. Passive thermo-adaptive textiles and other materials.. Advanced heat pump technology... Grants and subsidies!!!! Incentives for making existing buildings/homes more energy efficient & new buildings/home be GHG neutral. Make solar and wind energy more available in our community. Work on reducing costs of solar and wind energy. These are pretty well aligned, though i think the problem associated with trying to figure this out well also maintaining affordability is a challenging needle to thread Support retrofitting of homes for greater energy efficiency Help people pay for retrofitting Agreed! Thinking about self-reliance, especially with energy and power outages Yes! Emphasize job creation to retrofit buildings Both of these strategies align well for our community Participants offered initial reactions to actions and suggestions for additional actions, changes, or areas of prioritization (see Table 13 for complete responses).  Ban propone hookups Appendix F 16 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan  Subsidize energy audits for homeowners  Improve community education about energy use and negative impacts of wood burning  Regulate and/or prevent new infrastructure constriction near shorelines and bluffs Table 13. Buildings & Energy: What are your initial reactions to these actions? What would you add or change? What do you support? Responses More information about issues with burning wet wood or garbage should be distributed Please move the landfill inland Better communication to residents regarding existing and new programs regarding energy efficiency and areas in the City impacted by climate change. Minimizing wood stove use should be incentivized Move more infrastructure AWAY from shoreline. Armoring the shoreline to protect buildings can really impact the habitat for forage fish Impervious surface sidewalks and parking areas Building along bluffs is not climate change resilient, it should be regulated, not subsidized I would like to see project with a net ecological gain. We should identify ways to mitigate impacts on our important geological features, like our bluffs. I don't know that, here, we should focus our energy on community energy projects, given our power supply. I like action #2 focused on trying to re-align infrastructure on the shoreline but, boy, that is a tough nut to crack here For strategy #2, need to work with developers Private homes need to be weatherized to reduce the wood burned in the winter, but most residents cannot afford it. We need programs to help pay for it Ban new propane hookups, ban new gas stations. Only metal roofs. Increase density- more condos and apartments close to businesses The city should subsidize or offer energy efficiency audits so homeowners can easily identify sources of wasted energy/money Consumption & Waste Mike opens this focus area discussion by presenting two main strategies and corresponding actions, as shown in the table below. Strategies Example Actions Promote sustainable consumption. • Work towards banning or limiting single-use plastics. • Implement a sustainable purchasing policy for City departments and encourage other businesses to do so. Reduce waste-related GHG emissions from landfills. • Reduce organic food waste through food donation programs, greenwaste bins, and composting programs. • Evaluate and reduce facility-related emissions with Port Angeles’ wastewater treatment facility Appendix F 17 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Using the Zoom chat and Poll Everywhere platform, participants provided feedback on how these strategies aligned with their vision and what might be missing or needing change. Some reactions to these strategies include (see Table 14 for complete responses).  Need to make composting accessible – provide free curbside collection programs  More opportunities to reuse and repurpose  May not be a critical focus area, as it is the smallest source of emissions Table 14. Consumption & Waste: Do these strategies align with your vision? What might be missing or how would you change it? Responses Recycle, reuse, repurpose Stop charging for yard waste bins. City sponsorship, support, and advertising of existing programs through WSU for gleaning garden waste for our excellent Food Bank. Compost and green waste programs are key. Zero waste PA Need to think about circular economy - how do we ensure that we just don't throw away old electronics and things like that I don't know that I see these strategies as being as critical to focus on relative to some of the others. The ROI is small I think, thinking of the pie chart City wide food waste pick up Storm water management, especially related to wastewater releases, needs to be included here Our lawns turned into rain gardens with indigenous plantings Ban styrofoam Participants offered initial reactions to actions and suggestions for additional actions, changes, or areas of prioritization (see Table 15 for complete responses):  Overall, need more community education on this focus area  Provide residents with tools and resources for how to properly dispose of special waste or hard to recycle items  Incentivize and promote localized food production  Ban plastic bags Table 15. Consumption & Waste: What are your initial reactions to these actions? What would you add or change? What do you support? Responses Improve existing plastic bag ban to prevent Safeway from skirting the law Side dumping is happening along our creeks and in our parks. Attention to this issue would be great. Look at Tumwater and Verne Samuelson parks Need to focus on local foods - even if not in PA but in the County or on the peninsula. Incentives or subsidies for home gardens. We have great weather to grow our own food Promote buying local, or ordering things in a geographically responsible way, ban multiple use plastic bags Tool library Appendix F 18 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Responses Community gardens with activities that promote education Support limiting single use plastics and Styrofoam. Recycling containers should always be in city facilities, including local parks and areas wherever there are public trash cans. Encourage the existing DIY culture on the peninsula Encourage people to bring their own bags to shop. And maybe ban plastic bags. I feel that largely we should focus on actions that reduce our vulnerability to some of the major climate drivers, and largely I think these consumption actions don't do that. They DO, though, have some benefit, especially by reducing our transportation footprint. We need to make special recycling types more easily understandable to local people (how to recycle electronics, shoes, plastic bags, etc) Incentivize reduced fertilizer and pesticide use Incentivize safeway to stock more local food Municipal compost, only compostable take-out containers. Better recycling Education More compost bins for residents School age students need to tour waste facilities Appendix F 19 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Demographics Poll Mike closed out the workshop by walking through next steps and opportunities for continued public engagement with the Plan (slide 44).  Visit the weekly Farmers Market  Take the survey  Visit the website  Follow the interactive Climate Group calendar As a final step, Mike prompted participants to take an optional demographics Zoom poll. Of the 26 remaining public participants, 17 responded to the demographics poll. Which of the following best represents your race/ethnicity? (Check all that apply) Of the 17 participants who responded, 16 identified as White/Caucasian and I identified as Native American, American Indian, or Alaska Native. What is your age? Of the 17 participants who responded, five (5) were 45-54 years old and four (4) were 75 years old or older. 16 1 Race/Ethnicity White or Caucasian Native American, American Indian, or Alaska Native Appendix F 20 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan What is your gender identity? Of the 17 participants who responded, 10 identified as a woman and seven (7) identified as a man. How did you hear about this workshop? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 45-54 75 or older 35-44 25-34 55-64 65-74 Age 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 Man Woman Gender Identiy Appendix F 21 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Of the 17 participants who responded, four (4) said they said about this workshop through word of mouth, three (3) heard about it through social media, and another three (3) heard about it through the City of Port Angeles Website. Presentation Slides PowerPoint slides of the presentation are available on the following pages. 0 1 2 3 4 5 City of Port Angeles website City of Port Angeles website;Email Community organization Email Flyers/Mailers None of the above Social media Word of mouth Appendix F 1 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Public Workshop 2 Summary March 16th | 6:00 - 8:00 PM Recording available here Table of Contents Welcome ............................................................................................................................................................... 2 Updates on Climate Resiliency Plan Presentation ................................................................................................ 2 Transition to Breakout Rooms .............................................................................................................................. 3 Review and Refine Actions ................................................................................................................................... 5 Demographics Poll .............................................................................................................................................. 38 Presentation Slides ................................................................................................ Error! Bookmark not defined. Objectives 1.Provide an overview of progress since Workshop 1. 2.Review and refine list of prioritized actions. Agenda Time Agenda 5:55 – 6:00 Let Participants In 6:00 – 6:05 Welcome 6:00 – 6:05 •Record meeting •Orient on how to use/navigate Zoom Meeting 6:05 – 6:30 Updates on Climate Resiliency Plan Presentation 6:05 – 6:20 Climate Resiliency Plan Overview 6:20 – 6:30 Q&A Discussion 6:30 – 7:55 Review and Refine Actions 6:30 – 6:40 Overview of Breakout Rooms 6:40 – 7:55 Breakout Group Discussions 7:55 – 8:00 Workshop Conclusion Next Steps •Overview of the next steps to finalize the Climate Resiliency Plan •Concluding demographics poll •Thank you and contact information Appendix G 2 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan WELCOME Mike Chang kicked off the meeting with a welcome and several house-keeping items. UPDATES ON CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN PRESENTATION CLIMATE RESILIENCY PLAN OVERVIEW Ben Stanley gave a brief overview of the Climate Resiliency Plan: • How it was shaped: o 2016 Comprehensive Plan response o Based on best available science o Uses GHG emissions as metrics • What are the goals: o Identify gaps, inefficacies, strengths, and opportunities for development o Roadmap for immediate actions o Provide long range policy and strategy guidance • Where we are in the planning process: o Refining strategies and actions for inclusion in Plan OUTCOMES FROM OUR 1ST PUBLIC WORKSHOP Mike shared the participant visions for the future of Port Angeles during workshop 1: • Carbon neutral • City known for its healthy environment • Resilient and able to handle power outages • Walkable • More local food production • Affordable • Sense of community and opportunity for all Mike shared how the project team responded to workshop 1 participant feedback: • Inclusion of ambitious actions that pushes the City to carbon neutrality by 2030. • Highlight and elevate climate resilience with other priorities, such as healthcare, economic development, and affordable housing. • Focus on resilience and adaptation opportunities, especially for frontline groups such as elders, low-income families, people of color, youth. • Identify synergies with other key partners – such as the Port and the National Park. • Need to invest in multiple transportation strategies that allows for collective flexibility in transitioning away from fossil fuels. Appendix G 3 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan PLAN STRUCTURE AND DEVELOPMENT Mike walked through each focus area of the Plan and highlights the overarching goals, rationale for inclusion, and some example actions for each. He then provides an overview of the strategy development and prioritization process: • 124 initial actions, identified from existing City plans, comparable plans from other jurisdictions, previous work from the Climate Action Planning Group, and emerging best practices on climate action. • Initial consultant review to combine similar actions, getting us to approximately 70 actions. • Working with the Climate Action Planning Group and the City to prioritize 40 actions for a multi- criteria analysis (MCA). • Just because an action is not included in the MCA does not mean we will exclude it from the final Climate Resiliency Plan. Mike explained how the multi-criteria analysis (MCA) was used to prioritize the Plan’s resilience actions based on community values and other key criteria: impact, cost, feasibility, community support, equity, and co-benefits. He walked the participants through the Climate Action Planning Group’s (CAPG) rationale around actions that have already been approved and those which have been excluded. Finally, he teed up the goal of the breakout room activity planned for the workshop, which was to narrow down the current list of 70 actions to a more streamlined and manageable list of 50 actions for Plan inclusion. Q&A: Tony: Will actions that were already excluded be identified? • Mike: Yes, these actions and the rationale for exclusion will appear in the materials we have prepared for the breakout room activity. Bob: Can the Plan have an appendix of all actions that were considered and excluded so they are not lost? So that they may be considered if more funding or interest arises in the future? • Ben: That can be option. We are doing that for the list of actions that have been completed as well. These are important and made the list originally for a reason, so they can appear in as an appendix. • Emma: Can include the justification for including as appendix and bring to council for a decision. TRANSITION TO BREAKOUT ROOMS Mike provided an overview of the breakout room objectives and structure: • Almost 1.5 hours to discuss strategies and actions. • Randomly assigned breakout rooms. • Breakout room facilitators will each start on a different focus area and then cycle through each focus area. This allows for equal treatment of all focus areas. Appendix G 4 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan • Facilitators will review the current status and then go through actions without a decision. Facilitators will take notes in the “Notes” column. • Desired outcome: Identify which actions need to include or exclude from the Climate Resiliency Plan, with an intent to get down to no more than 50 actions. Mike went over the current landscape of the actions before participants broke out for discussion: • 25 actions already approved • 4 actions to exclude • 45 actions to still consider • Facilitators will prioritize actions that have not had CAPG review or decisions that the breakout group disagrees with There were three (3) breakout groups facilitated by Mike and Megan, Mary Ann, and Ben and Emma. Each group had approximately 6-8 people. Appendix G 5 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan REVIEW AND REFINE ACTIONS COMMUNITY RESILIENCE AND WELLBEING Status Pre-workshop Post-workshop Actions to include in Plan 7 13 Actions to exclude from Plan* 2 7 Undecided actions 12 1 * Inclusive of actions that are to be included, but merged with other actions. Discussion ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in plan? Strategy 1: Increase community adaptive capacity 121 Water regulations Increase regional capacity for water storage through key regulations and capital projects: • Incentivize and regulate rainwater harvesting • Create regulations that require water efficient appliances (washers, dishwashers, toilets, etc.) • Enhance stormwater retention in upstream areas where appropriate and feasible. • Develop code and infrastructure for reclaimed water system. • Use results of the "groundwater strategy" to inform regulations and capital projects. Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Doesn’t seem that important Vote • 1 yes to bullets 1 and 4, rest said no Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Likely to score moderate to high as regulatory/infrastructure action (higher impact) that addresses moderate resilience need, equity & co-benefits benefits Remove No N/A Appendix G 6 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in plan? 62 Community Rating System Participate in FEMA's Community Rating System. CAPG: Determined this was a good action; however might already be doing this. If not doing this already, need to confirm that the City of PA qualifies for this program. Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Maybe include: Does this take a lot of staff time to participate in? Maybe the action needs more explanation? Are we already following those protocols? • Maybe exclude: since flooding could be a low risk? Does “basement” flooding” count? Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Likely to score low-moderate due to lower impact and moderate on other criteria Revise to include more detail Yes N/A 122 Local groundwater strategy Develop and implement a local groundwater strategy that includes study of the local aquifer and actions to address groundwater issues near bluffs. CAPG: Could be integrated into action 121 to keep in plan. Likely a low- impact strategy Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Include in Action 59!! • Question: Is the city looking for future water needs for reduced snowpack? If so, then looking at alt water sources is essential. • Recommend: This is a higher priority than 121 (121 is more regulation, this would be Merge with 121 and 59 Yes, as part of 59 N/A Appendix G 7 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in plan? important to know if this is a future water source). Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Likely to score low-moderate due to lower impact with moderate other benefits and low costs. May be needed for “water regulations” action to be more effective. 120 Community- based accountability Partner with environmental education organizations such as AmeriCorps or the County Health Department on major climate-related events to raise awareness and increase adoption of climate-friendly activities, beginning with a Climate Week and food waste reduction competition. • Create a Climate Change Week to designate a week each year for City and community evaluation of the progress made on meeting community commitments and goals relating to reducing our contribution and vulnerability to climate change. • Create a food waste reduction competition: Led by City; ask restaurants to be creative in how to reduce food waste; different neighborhoods doing different sustainability actions (e.g., how far your food traveled). • Develop local demonstration projects and highlight local business' sustainability initiatives CAPG: All of these ideas are integrated into action 119. Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • No objections. Look at 119, where’s the accountability of the actions? Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • As outreach action, likely to perform similar to “comprehensive climate education and outreach.” Merge with 119 Yes, as part of 119 N/A 84 Comprehensiv e Plan priorities Use the Comprehensive Plan to reinforce climate resilience: Suggested Revision: • Use the climate resilience plan to inform the comp plan (flip the Description: Use the Resiliency Plan Yes N/A Appendix G 8 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in plan? • Include a climate change resilience element in the Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan. • Develop policy in comprehensive plan that sites infrastructure • outside of current and future hazard areas. • Meeting HB 1099 requirements (granted it passes in 2022 legislative session) language). Unless this is going to happen anyway. Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Likely to score low-moderate due to lower impact (policy action), moderate other benefits, and low costs to inform Comprehensive Plan updates: (then list the bullets at left) 85 County-City coordination Coordinate and partner with Clallam County, Tribal partners, and OMH to implement regional climate resilience policies. Review the County-Wide Planning Process agreement for its climate preparedness. CAPG: Identified as a key action to do to ensure regional resilience. Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Likely to score moderate due to lower impact, moderate-high other benefits, and low costs. None Yes N/A 87 City volunteer coordinator Hire a volunteer coordinator for the City to help support climate resilience actions that require community or volunteer capacity. Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Yes – thought of as a gap with County work from 2009 But… too vague and may not be ready to propose this as an action… So maybe leave off? But we do need someone. • Consider program coordinator in the future, but maybe not within this plan. Implementation considerations: • They have to have something clear to do- we haven’t said yes to the community-based education… So what would they be doing? Remove, but add as implementation consideration No N/A Appendix G 9 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in plan? • Who is paying for this position? The City? • Sounds like volunteer focus would be education. This needs a list of voluntary actions that would require work over-time. • Maybe move to the implementation plan? Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Likely to score low-moderate due to lower impact, moderate other benefits, and higher City costs. 89 Housing access and coordination Increase affordable housing and access that helps support community wellbeing (e.g., climate migration concerns, increase social cohesion). Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Yes, Include (combine with 116) Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Likely to score moderate. Needs to link to Housing Action Plan implementation more strongly. Merge with 116 Yes, as part of 116 N/A 116 Housing Action Plan implementatio n Implement key provisions of the Port Angeles Housing Action Plan. This includes: • Implement Cottage Housing Development (CHD) that allows small lot single family housing developers to construct these types of housing products in feasible and appropriate single family neighborhoods including Residential Single Family (RS-7, RS-9, and RS-11) zones where the added density will benefit from walkable distances to CAPG: Approved since it was the highest priority action from MCA. Implementation consideration: • Done some of this in building residential capacity update (Implementation plan consideration). Add Action 89 into this action description as bullet point. Yes 4.0 Appendix G 10 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in plan? existing transit, school, employment, community facility, and other supporting services. (Complete) • Expand the definition of allowable innovative, functional, and cost-effective housing products such as duplex, attached single family, town or row houses, tandem houses, manor houses, congregate housing, micro housing, small efficiency dwelling units (SEDU), and mixed-use structures among others in the Residential Medium Density (RMD) and Residential High Density (RHD) zones. (Complete) • Subdivide land into parcels that may be smaller than the minimum lot specified in the zoning district so long as the average of all of the lot sizes created remains equal to or above the minimum lot size. Lot size averaging is similar to cluster development in that it makes efficient use of the developable portions of a site building to the allowable density while protecting environmental and other features, and providing housing type developments that are compatible with the surrounding neighborhood (Complete - have infill development code now) • Provide additional (height) floor, reduced parking ratios (completed by Council action to deprioritize parking - parking minimums), and increased site coverage for mixed-use projects that provide on or off-site affordable housing units within appropriate land use districts and overlays such as the Planned Residential Development (PRD), Planned Low Impact Development (PLID), Mixed Commercial Overlay (MCO), and Infill Overlay Zone (IOZ). Appendix G 11 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in plan? • Model ADU plans to build accessible housing • City-led pilot project on affordable housing 36 Climate migration policy Integrate considerations for climate change migration in Comprehensive Plan update and into existing City policies (e.g., land use policies, housing policies), using a land capacity analysis to inform policy changes. CAPG: Approved since one of the highest priority actions from MCA Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • This could be integrated into land use and housing… This would be forecasting so if this was included in those housing + land use forecasts would be streamlined. • We have to integrate climate migration into our housing, land use, and infrastructure plans… So making that explicit. Suggested revision: • Assess climate migration impacts with forecasting every 5 years. And integrate those findings into comp plan, infrastructure plans, revenue forecasting, and housing assessments, etc.. (rather than have a climate change migration policy). Description: Assess climate migration impacts with forecasting every 5 years. Integrate those findings into the Comprehensive Plan, infrastructure plans, revenue forecasting, and housing assessments. Yes 3.8 119 Comprehensiv e climate outreach & education Develop comprehensive climate outreach & education programs. The City will act as the technical and expert advisor, and partner with NODC to leverage resources. This includes: • Renewable energy tours: Create a "renewable energy" or "energy efficiency" home tour, like a neighborhood garden tour or Master Gardener program, for neighbors to learn from each other Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Include, with revision below (these things listed would be what a city volunteer coordinator would be doing—maybe for implementation planning) Second sentence revision: The city will partner with NODC to leverage resources for technical and Yes 3.6 Appendix G 12 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in plan? on how to implement renewable energy or energy efficient upgrades in their homes. • Host community conversations in climate vulnerable locations to educate and train community on how to adapt to those climate impacts. • Involve high school students in climate work and developing a yearly “Climate Action Report Card." • Create a Climate Change Week to designate a week each year for City and community evaluation of the progress made on meeting community commitments and goals relating to reducing our contribution and vulnerability to climate change. • Create a food waste reduction competition: Led by City; ask restaurants to be creative in how to reduce food waste; different neighborhoods doing different sustainability actions (e.g., how far your food traveled). • Develop local demonstration projects and highlight local business' sustainability initiatives expert advice plus outreach and education. 59 Water supply monitoring & enhancement Work with county and state partners to identify monitoring needs and enhance water supply monitoring. (e.g., improve forecasting for future water supply and demand under climate change, study ways to enhance water storage and groundwater aquafer recharge in the city) Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Yes and merge with 122 (local groundwater strategy) Suggested revision: • The city will partner with NODC to leverage resources for technical and expert advice plus outreach and education. Add action 122 into this action description. Description: Work with county and state partners to identify monitoring needs and Yes 3.5 Appendix G 13 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in plan? enhance water supply monitoring. (e.g., improve forecasting for future water supply and demand under climate change, study ways to enhance water storage and groundwater aquifer recharge in the city). This includes developing and implementing a local groundwater strategy that includes study of the local aquifer and actions to address groundwater issues near bluffs. Appendix G 14 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in plan? 17 SLR vulnerability assessment Conduct a sea level rise evaluation in conjunction with Clallam County and the NODC to evaluate the vulnerability of City assets including roads (motorized & non), other infrastructure (sewage treatment, water, buildings), and marine access. This includes: • Reference the City Emergency Mitigation Plan to identify vulnerable infrastructure. • Analyze sewer system capacity and vulnerability to sea level rise, and identify actions to increase resilience. • Evaluate roads and structures along bluff crests for erosion threat with SLR for planned retreat and ecosystem restoration; minimize realignment and protection. • Identify areas for action through the Capital Facilities Plan. CAPG: Flagged as key foundational action to include. Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • YES, not a big lift or risk? • Coastal assets on the spit (maybe more an issue for coast guard)? Short Name: SLR vulnerability assessment of City assets Yes 3.5 13 Sustainable agriculture Partner with NODC to designate funding to promote and establish urban sustainable agriculture/food forests. This may include: • Encourage partnerships between local farms/farmers and residents to establish local food production projects. • Create agreement and resource availability systems for allowing gardening for food, habitat, or both in the right-of-way (e.g., planting strips). • Explore the feasibility of water utility pricing incentives and grey water to conserve and reuse water. Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • As written not a top priority, longer term priority • Shift away from sustainable ag and food forests and refocus on food security Suggested revision: • Make PA food secure- promote sustainable ag, multiple sources for food procurement for food security. Description: Make Port Angeles food secure- promote sustainable ag, multiple sources for food procurement for food security. Yes 3.4 115 Hazard Mitigation Plan Implement key provisions of the 2019 Hazard Mitigation Plan: CAPG: Flagged as key foundational action to include. Inclusion/exclusion rationale: None Yes 3.3 Appendix G 15 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in plan? implementatio n • Promote FireWise building design for construction in the Vision Master Plan and Housing Programs. • Develop alternate water supplies to provide reserve water sources to be used in event of drought or water shortage. • Develop advanced warning systems. • Identify Elders and other vulnerable populations to prioritize for mitigation and disaster assistance. • Develop and/or improve Emergency Plans such as Evacuation Plans, Tribal Records Protection Plan, Continuity of Operations Plan, etc. • Update flood assessment. • Create and expand water efficiency/conservation programs. • Yes, but weary of FireWise because increased building cost. Also, FireWise should be in buildings or excluded. Housing is way more important than considering codes for FireWise. Also the FireWise is likely more important in county and timbered areas rather than in the city. So maybe in the county but not the city? 45 City asset vulnerability Create tool to evaluate vulnerability of City assets, projects, and activities. Incorporate tool into City workflow (e.g., permits and expenditures), updates of the Hazard Mitigation Plan, and Capital Facilities Plan. Include training for City staff, Council, and committees in the use of the tool. Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Yes? Maybe? Answer first bullet in 115 for wildfire? Implementation considerations: • Could we make this a vulnerability assessment rather than creating a tool? • Could do focused based on assets or climate risks that are most important? • Could build a vulnerability index for different asset classes, etc. every 5 years. Short Name: City asset vulnerability tool Yes 3.3 8 City price on carbon Develop a City of Port Angeles' carbon pricing program and invest revenue into energy efficiency and clean energy projects. Build this price on carbon into City procurement decisions. Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Maybe for city procurement and investment decisions: City could assess the role of pricing carbon. Description: Assess the role of carbon pricing in Yes 2.8 Appendix G 16 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in plan? City could include a price of carbon in their investment decisions. (needs a rewrite) Suggested revision: • Assess the role of carbon pricing in driving equity and resilience. Build explicit price of carbon in city procurement decisions driving equity and resilience outcomes. Build explicit price of carbon in city procurement decisions Strategy 2: Prepare for extreme events 88 Climate resiliency hubs Create climate resiliency hubs at key locations (e.g., library) to support residents during extreme events such as flooding or heat waves. Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Move to #86. Merge with 86 Yes, as part of 86 N/A 86 Climate resilience & emergency planning Continue to collaborate with emergency planning partners to: • Integrate climate considerations into emergency and hazard mitigation planning. • Implement city-wide emergency planning exercises and education (i.e., Map Your Neighborhood) to build community resilience during emergency events. CAPG: Approved since one of the highest priority actions from MCA. Add action 88 into this actin description as bullet point. Yes 3.7 14 Wildfire urban interface Update municipal codes to account for enhanced fire risk at forest/residential interface where needed. Reference the International Wildland-Urban Interface Code. Updates could include: • Require jurisdictions to provide warning of properties that lie in the fire hazard areas. • Require new construction and incentivize existing buildings to install venting and other features that resist ember wash ignition. Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Maybe a better place for defensible space, but change to “educate on FireWise”? • Concerns of requiring different construction codes. Increases cost of construction. Need to have the evidence that fire is risk. • Regulations are driving price of housing up and we need more Description: Provide education and incentives for new construction and incentivize existing buildings to install venting Yes 3.4 Appendix G 17 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in plan? housing because houseless community at greater risk for loss of life. Opposition to requiring building codes/firewise. and other features that resist ember wash ignition. 115 Flood vulnerability and risk Work with state partners to encourage FEMA to incorporate climate change in rate maps and guidance. Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • No? Does the city have influence on FEMA? Maybe the County and/or State? Remove No 2.9 Appendix G 18 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ECOSYSTEM HEALTH Status Pre-workshop Post-workshop Actions to include in Plan 5 14 Actions to exclude from Plan 0 3 Undecided actions 13 1 Discussion ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in Plan? Strategy 1: Restore and protect natural habitat 50 Submerged habitat monitoring Work with DNR and the Clallam County marine resources committee to complete a survey of sensitive submerged habitats and the species that utilize them and monitor them for change. Implementation considerations: • Seems like a good project – could work create project with Peninsula College and UW students/interns – may be some existing grant money to put towards this effort • Work with local tribes and their biologists on this action Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Likely to perform similarly to similar Ecosystem Health actions in the bottom 20 of MCA results (e.g., wildlife corridors). None Yes N/A 53 Climate sensitive tree species Utilize climate sensitive (adaptable) tree species in riparian buffers. Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Very important for salmon recovery, particularly due to logging • Lot of riparian area that could use help • Are they native? Important to use native species – Description: Consult with tree experts to utilize climate sensitive (adaptable) Yes N/A Appendix G 19 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in Plan? Votes: • 1 yes Suggested revisions: • Consider using native plants to close jurisdictions (Thurston County) • Add language “Consult with tree experts” detrimental to use invasive/non-native species Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Likely to perform similarly to similar Ecosystem Health actions in the bottom 20 of MCA results (e.g., wildlife corridors). tree and native species in riparian buffers. 54 Culvert replacement Replace undersized culverts to anticipate climate influenced run-off events and renovate outdated culverts to support fish populations. Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Involve schools • Is this action outside of the city’s scope? Seems like more of a State/federal action • City has probably already inventoried problem culverts • Yay to culvert removals and reducing land- based pollutants! We surrounded by sensitive water bodies Votes: • 1 yes Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Likely to perform similarly to similar Ecosystem Health actions in the bottom 20 of MCA results (e.g., critical area protection). May score a bit higher due to benefits to salmon. None Yes N/A Appendix G 20 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in Plan? 55 Land-based pollutant reduction Reduce land-based pollutants that enhance acidification in marine waters. Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Biggest impact would be changing parking requirements – doesn’t cost the city anything Votes: • 3 yes Implementation consideration: • Since its non-point source, might be paired with public education effort about disposing of chemicals Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Likely to perform similar to “coastal erosion reduction.” Score may be slightly higher due to benefits to marine habitat. None Yes N/A 117 Capital Facilities Plan implementation Implement key provisions of the 2022- 2027 Preliminary Capital Facilities Plan Transportation Improvement Plan. This includes: • H Street stormwater outfall: Identify an alternative alignment for failing pipe between Marine Drive and reduce flooding near Crown Park neighborhood. • N Street Outfall: Improve the N Street Outfall to minimize future localized erosion and allow for monitoring and maintenance. • Francis St Outfall Repair: Repair the Francis Street Outfall. The culvert is currently buried in beach CAPG: Need to begin planning for infrastructure resilience in early phases. Discussed but did not recommend for inclusion/exclusion from Plan. Implementation considerations: • Who are our allies and where to they get their funding? Leverage partners for funding. Votes: • 2 yes Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Likely to perform similarly to “Hazard Mitigation Plan implementation” None Yes N/A Appendix G 21 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in Plan? sediment and should be a pipe on the riprap bank with a dissipater. • Valley Creek Culvert & Outfall: Raise the Valley Creek Culvert & Outfall. Currently, sediment repeatedly fills the culvert, reducing capacity. • Wastewater Pump Station 3 Upgrade between Marine Drive and Hill Street. • Daylight Valley and Tumwater Creeks. • Recouple First and Front Streets as two-way streets. 9 Urban tree canopy, parks, and open space Protect urban tree canopy, parks, and open space. This may include: • Develop a tree protection ordinance that emphasizes older trees. • Incentivize urban tree planting, especially in public areas (e.g., street planting strips). CAPG: Approved since one of the highest priority actions from MCA. None Yes 3.6 37 Coastal erosion reduction Encourage soft armoring of shorelines to protect infrastructure and habitat, particularly along Ediz Hook. Implement native vegetation and other natural resource management practices to reduce landslides and coastal erosion CAPG: Approved since one of the highest priority actions from MCA. None Yes 3.4 Appendix G 22 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in Plan? 24 Shoreline Master Program updates Incorporate climate change more explicitly into the Shoreline Master Program. CAPG: Identified as key foundational action to include. None Yes 3.3 26 Harmful algal bloom monitoring Work with Port Angeles Harbor Clean- up partners, as well as NOAA, to increase funding to monitor harmful algal blooms in the Port Angeles harbor. Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Same partners as the other marine study, including tribes • Huge priority for Makah • Haven’t had big issues on the Elwha with HAB – seen more in freshwater bodies. More important to do on near shore environments. • Little bit lower priority – this issue is mostly related to farming and freshwater water bodies • Could be relevant is in Lake Sutherland • Bigger issues is invasive species Vote: • Maybe but lower priority; 1 yes No: Importa nt issue on Peninsul a, but not for this Plan 3.3 25 Critical area protection Add climate impact overlays to existing “Critical Areas”. Create critical area flood mapping beyond FEMA’s historical flood data to inform future development and support prohibition of permanent infrastructure in those areas. CAPG: Identified as key foundational action to include. None Yes 3.2 51 Wildlife corridors Enhance, restore, and protect wildlife corridors to help wildlife adapt to climate impacts. Potential corridors include: Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Low priority – bigger issue for Seattle (seconded agreement) Reduce community support score. New MCA score: 3.0 No 3.1 Appendix G 23 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in Plan? • Six creek valleys • Marine bluff • Areas within west-side forests • Thanks to past leaders the City has been protecting these corridors – already see wildlife in yards 27 Salmon habitat protection Work with local ecological restoration partners (e.g., Clallam County Streamkeepers) to monitor and analyze climate change impact at salmon stream restoration sites and 6 creeks in the City. Use the Habitat Recovery Pilot Program to support restoration efforts. Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Salmon habitat - Very important - for ecology, economics, and local culture • ^ Agree. Salmon are huge resource for this area Vote: • 2 yes Increase community support score. MCA score remains: 3.0 Yes 3.0 49 Native plant landscaping Incentivize use of native plants landscaping in residential, commercial, and industrial settings within the City (e.g. partner with the County, Clallam Conservation District, and Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe's Natural Resources Department). Implementation considerations: • May sound unimportant, but is the root of many things (difficult and costly to revert invasive species damage) • ^ Agree – Is difficult to plant native plants in unforested areas; are there ways to phrase this around that? • Encourage the Conservation District, Master Gardeners, and nurseries to educate folks on local species Vote: • 2 yes None Yes 2.7 Strategy 2: Address sea level rise 118 Resilience of clean- up sites Evaluate and address sea level rise in local clean-up sites. This includes: CAPG: Need to begin planning for infrastructure resilience in early phases. Discussed but did not recommend for inclusion/exclusion from Plan. None No Decision N/A Appendix G 24 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in Plan? • Raynoier Mill: Evaluate the Raynoier Mill contamination remediation site and settling pond for sea level rise resilience. Reduce any vulnerabilities found from the evaluation. • Western Port Angeles Harbor: Address SLR in Clean-up Actions. • K Ply properties: Clean-up plans for K Ply properties should address SLR. • Marine Drive: Clean-up plans should address SLR. • Marine Trades Area: Clean-up should address SLR. • Assess Capital Facilities Plan project on: (1) how it modifies GHG emissions or sequestration? (2) how it helps us adapt to increased natural hazards (coastal flooding, winter freezes, summer heat, wildfire, drought)? and (3) how it contributes to a resilient low-energy-use urban landscape? Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Is very important but cleaning up sites is a little separate from climate action – should just cleanup sites ASAP. Deprioritize Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Likely to perform similarly or higher than “wastewater facility GHG” study. 97 CBA of armor repair Conduct Benefit-Cost Analysis of shoreline armor repairs along Olympic Discovery Trail, Hill Street west, and both sides of Ediz Hook. Address concerns of Native American burial remains on the shoreline. Vote: • 1 yes Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Likely to perform similarly to other coastal baseline assessments. May be slightly higher due to Ediz Hook focus area. None Yes N/A Appendix G 25 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in Plan? 104 Boat launch repair Repair the boat launch at Ediz Hook, incorporating sea level rise and coastal storm projections to ensure resilience to future conditions Vote: • 1 yes Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Likely to score low-moderate as small-scale infrastructure project that is important to community. None Yes N/A Strategy 3: Increase opportunities for carbon sequestration and storage 114 Forest and marine habitat preservation Partner with organizations and individuals (e.g., National Marine Sanctuary, Olympic NPS/NF, NOAA, PSP WA DNR, WA DFW, FMLC, and private timber landholders) and the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe to preserve forest and marine habitats, developing new strategies where needed. CAPG: Approved since one of the highest priority actions from MCA. Acknowledge that the City owns land in the Morse Creek Watershed. Yes 3.9 Strategy 3: Increase carbon sequestration potential 28 • Extension of timber harvest rotation Work with the County to encourage timber companies to extend timber harvest rotation times, as longer aged trees will sequester more carbon. Vote: • 1 yes, 2 No No 3.0 Appendix G 26 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan BUILDINGS AND ENERGY Status Pre-workshop Post-workshop Actions to include in Plan 4 8 Actions to exclude from Plan 1 2 Undecided actions 10 5 Discussion ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in Plan? Strategy 1: Mitigate energy-related GHG emissions 12 Green incentive program Develop green incentive programs for residential and commercial development. Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Include if it subsumed some of the other actions (policy level) Implementation considerations: • May be an overlap with other similar types of programs. Certification programs and awards might make it more holistic. Create a unique set of standards? Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Likely to score low. Could be improved by leveraging state programs or combining with other actions. None Yes N/A 69 Low-impact development Eliminate barriers that prevent the use of low impact development techniques Inclusion/exclusion rationale: None No decision N/A Appendix G 27 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in Plan? and BMPs, such as vegetated roofs, permeable pavement, and bioretention, while maintaining safety and aesthetic quality in the building process. (e.g., work with financial institutions to lower barriers to non-traditional, green building practices.). Provide LID demonstration/education sites on city property. • Low Impact can be defined in energy use as well. Green subdivision design? Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Likely to score low-moderate due to low impact. Would be strengthened by combining with “green incentive program.” 71 Green energy Purchase green energy from the grid. CAPG: This will likely be done already in the BPA Renewal agreement. Also, fairly low impact since most of energy is hydropower. Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Was evaluated as part of BPA renewal agreement None No N/A 74 Efficient outdoor lighting Convert streetlights to LED and install photovoltaic panels on existing buildings and for stand-alone lighting on streets and in parks where appropriate and productive. Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Likely to score low due to low impact and low-moderate on most other criteria. None No decision N/A 75 Promote Green Business certification Set goals for government departments and encourage all local businesses to become certified by the Green Business program of Jefferson County Health. Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Likely to score low due to low impact. Could be integrated with City and community sustainable purchasing as an incentive. None No decision N/A Appendix G 28 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in Plan? 83 EV parking requirements Mandate that all multifamily housing and other types of housing have EV parking capacity. Include incentives in the code to support bicycle storage (i.e., racks) and ride share amenities. CAPG: Approved since one of the highest priority actions from MCA. None Yes 3.4 4 Energy efficient home heating sources Incentivize homeowners to switch heating sources from wood-burning stoves and propane to high-efficiency electrical heaters and other less carbon intensive sources. Leverage existing BPA program and state and federal funding sources. None Yes 3.2 3 Energy efficiency retrofits Incentivize redevelopments to include energy efficient retrofits, such as weatherization and energy efficient appliances, while avoiding the split incentive. Prioritize based on conservation potential and ability to alleviate financial stress for those who are energy-burdened. None Yes 3.1 10 Net metering monitoring Monitor net-metering uses to track progress, growth, and changes. Incentivize large, private energy users (Port of PA, Olympic Medical Center, etc.) to disclose their energy use per building. None No decision 3.1 11 Green Building standards Develop climate-smart Green Building standards for all City-owned buildings and develop a green building program. This should include: Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Already created. Don’t need to recreate the wheel Remove No 3.0 Appendix G 29 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in Plan? • Climate-smart permitting: Incorporate future climate change scenarios when calculating level of service for permitting city facilities and services. • LEED (or comparable, e.g., Living Building Challenge (LBC)) certification: Build all new City buildings and develop sites to at least a LEED Silver criterion for energy, water and waste conservation strategies (e.g., Architecture 2030, LBC certification). • Conduct energy audits for each city or county owned buildings and infrastructure (includes hospitals and school districts) to develop and implement a plan to reduce energy consumption. Instate a fee for properties that do not meet their audit targets. 5 BPA renewal agreement Review and renegotiate Bonneville power franchise agreement and ensure renewable, resilient, and low-GHG emission sources that protects healthy habitat for salmon and other aquatic species. Include the option to purchase green energy from the grid and other power providers. Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • This is related to Action 71. Should be higher on the list. Move up below Action 71 Yes 2.9 Strategy 2: Reduce vulnerability Appendix G 30 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in Plan? 52 Acquisition program Develop a combined grant/district program for acquisition of high-risk structures in coastal or riverine flood zones. CAPG: Need to begin planning for infrastructure resilience in early phases. Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Likely to score moderate-high because of impact and equity benefits. Relies on baseline assessments. None No decision N/A 64 Retrofit buildings for vulnerability Disincentivize development and remove existing infrastructure in the coastal nearshore (i.e., managed retreat). If not possible, retrofit infrastructure for coastal flooding and sea level rise. Consider hard shoreline protection in certain areas, such as bluff crests where infrastructure needs to be realigned and protected. This action would be informed by the SLR vulnerability assessment. CAPG: Need to begin planning for infrastructure resilience in early phases. Approved since one of the highest priority actions from MCA. None Yes 3.5 48 Climate-smart finance policies Disincentivize building in high-risk areas, add filing to property record, and financially prepare for development that may still continue in high-risk areas such as stream ravines and marine bluffs (e.g., require long-term bonds) CAPG: Need to begin planning for infrastructure resilience in early phases. This action is also important for funding long-term projects. None Yes 3.3 Strategy 3: Increase resiliency of energy systems 2 Community renewable energy grid Invest in capital projects that develop community energy projects (e.g., local microgrids, local solar project) to ensure CAPG: Approved since one of the highest priority actions from MCA. None Yes 3.6 Appendix G 31 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in Plan? there is energy supply redundancy, especially with the City or neighborhoods lose power. Consider partnerships with Clallam PUD and low- or zero-rate homeowner credit. Appendix G 32 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan CONSUMPTION AND WASTE Status Pre-workshop Post-workshop Actions to include in Plan 3 8 Actions to exclude from Plan 0 2 Undecided actions 7 0 Discussion and Outcomes ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in Plan? Strategy 1: Promote sustainable consumption 22 Asphalt recycling plant Work with State legislators to encourage support for asphalt recycling plant for rural areas. Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Need lots of county and city support • Need to identify funding source • Impact: Does it only become impactful when this is don’t in bulk • Cost: astronomical but not if city pays for it • Community support: Unsure of any • Equity: Unsure • Co-benefits: High – there may be other co-benefits by decreasing oil imports to the Peninsula. If this is crushed locally, it can lead to cost and import co-benefits. • Contact local businesses to use reuse waste Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Likely to score low-moderate due to higher impact sector but higher costs and moderate on other benefits (i.e., not a promising green sector). None No N/A Appendix G 33 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in Plan? 56 Water consumption education / incentives Reduce water consumption through education and incentive programs. For example: • Create a smart grid water use system and share data with consumers to increase conservation. • Promote and incentivize smart irrigation technologies for golf courses and parks. • Update water rates to discourage lawn watering lawns. • Provide incentives for efficient food cultivation. Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Good item, but maybe less of a priority given other more pressing issues • ^ Agree. City may already have a plan to deal with water issues. Pressure to deal with this issue, but maybe this isn’t the place to focus on water consumption. • But more about resiliency than climate action Vote: • 1 yes, 1 maybe Implementation consideration: • Grant funding for drip irrigation Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Likely to score similar but lower than “comprehensive climate change education and outreach” None Yes N/A 108 Producer responsibility Work with the State to impose state statewide producer packaging fee to disincentivize use of intensive packaging. Use revenue from fees to fund local climate mitigation/adaptation projects. Implementation considerations: • How will this reduce GHG emissions? • What will the repercussions be if we do this? (i.e., Safeway plastic bag ban: example of going around legislation) • Key will be to simply reduce the amount of single use plastic used – plastic is very hard to recycle; should instead focus on eliminating its use • Wise to require producers to reduce single use plastic use and invest revenue elsewhere • Good action. Realistically, the state will have to drive producer responsibility actions. Seems a bit too specific. Amend action to reduce some specificity to align with state action. Revision seconded. None No N/A Appendix G 34 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in Plan? Vote: • City breakout room: No • Mike’s breakout room: 1 Yes, 1 Maybe Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Likely to score moderate due to higher impact but low- moderate on other factors. 7 City and community sustainable purchasing Utilize a "Green Team" model to develop sustainable purchasing policies for the City and community. CAPG: Approved since one of the highest priority actions from MCA. None Yes 3.7 20 Commercial food waste diversion programs Consistent with the County Solid Waste Management Plan, work with the County to develop food waste diversion and composting programs for commercial businesses, such as diverting food waste to donation programs, placing compost bins around the city, and identifying end-use applications for compost, to reduce climate changing gases that are emitted when organics rot in landfills. Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Good action. We are lacking commercial food waste programs. Voting: • 2 yes, 1 maybe Implementation considerations: • Partner with local farms if possible • Would work if voluntary • Our transfer station sells compost – the Highschool in Sequim has horticulture class and sells compost • Encourage Master Gardeners to ramp up existing programs • A lot of spinoffs and extra things that can be associated. Coordinating with already existing programs. Can be a pilot program None Yes 3.3 21 Residential food waste diversion programs Consistent with the County Solid Waste Management Plan, develop food waste diversion program for households such Implementation considerations: • Partner with local farms if possible Reduced Community support MCA score. Yes 3.3 Appendix G 35 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in Plan? as using green waste bins for compost to eliminate landfilling of food waste that cause methane emissions. • Would work if voluntary – we currently have lawn waste bins – unsure if this is going to compost or not. Fee through City. • Encourage Master Gardeners to ramp up existing programs • Not as much of a priority as Commercial Vote: • 1 yes, 1 maybe MCA score remains: 3.3 Strategy 2: Eliminate/reduce single use plastics 105 Single use plastics Work toward limiting or banning single-use plastics and Styrofoam packaging. Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Styrofoam needs to go- look at our coastline • Already done, but companies find ways to get around it. Needs reframing. See suggested rewrite in Action Updates column. Vote: • Mikes breakout room: 2 yes • City breakout room: No Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Likely to score similar to City and community waste diversion actions (low-moderate). Short Name: Plastic packaging reductions Description: Limit plastic packaging in conjunction with state and federal programs Yes N/A Strategy 3: Increase diversion from landfills TBD Circular economy action plan Develop a circular economy plan. Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Action identified after City Council asked consultant team about more ambitious actions needed to reach carbon neutrality by 2030 goals. None Yes N/A Appendix G 36 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan ID Action Short Name Action Description Workshop Outcomes MCA Score Discussion Action Updates Include in Plan? 106 Circular economy When bringing trash to landfill, various groups/orgs can pull out different types of materials out. What's left over goes to landfill. Waste diversion and focus on reuse/circular economy. • Donate materials to local organizations, such as Around-Again, Habitat Store, Goodwill, Serenity House Thrift Store. • Conduct a waste feasibility study to identify waste diversion rates and reuse opportunities. Inclusion/exclusion rationale: • Definitely in support of reuse and recycling Implementation consideration: • Support but not feasible at the city level – phrase as a low priority Consultant comments for non-MCA actions: • Circular economy, in general, is a key gap in actions that were evaluated and is needed to meet carbon neutrality by 2030. This action is likely to score moderate-high. Short Name: Beneficial materials reuse Yes N/A Strategy 4: Decrease waste-related GHG emissions 19 Wastewater facility GHG Evaluate wastewater facility to reduce GHG emissions. CAPG: Approved since one of the highest priority actions from MCA. Short Name: Wastewater facility emissions reduction Yes 3.7 Appendix G 37 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan TRANSPORTATION Current status: • 6 actions already flagged for inclusion. • 1 action to exclude (because a non-starter unpopular action). • 3 actions to make decisions on. Due to workshop time constraints, this sector was prioritized last and as a result did not receive a review. It was deprioritized because: a) it had the fewest number of actions that still required a decision, and b) because transportation is the largest source of GHG emissions, we anticipated all actions in this section to be included in the final Climate Resiliency Plan. Appendix G 38 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan DEMOGRAPHICS POLL Mike closed out the workshop by providing an overview of how participant feedback from both workshops would be in incorporated into final plan and thanked all participants for their valued contributions. As a final step, Mike prompted the remaining 13 participants to participate in the following voluntary demographics polls: Which of the following best represents your race/ethnicity? (Check all that apply) Of the 13 participants, nine (9) identified as White/Caucasian, three (3) selected “I prefer not to say,” and one (1) did not respond. 69% 23% 8% Racial IdentityWhite or Caucasian I prefer not to say No response Appendix G 39 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan What is your age? Of the 12 participants who responded, four (4) were 35-44 years old. 2 42211 Under 1818-2425-3435-4445-5455-6465-7475 or overI prefer not to say Age Appendix G 40 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan What is your gender identity? Of the 13 participants, three (3) identified as a woman, eight (8) identified as a man, and two (2) declined to respond. 0123456789 Man Woman No Response Gender Identity Appendix G 41 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan How did you hear about this workshop? Of the 12 participants who responded, three (3) said they said about this workshop through email and another (3) heard about it through a community organization. 3 2 2 3 2 Word of mouthCommunity organizationTabling eventCity of Port Angeles websiteEmailFlyers/MailersSocial mediaNone of the above Appendix G PORT ANGELES RESILIENCY PLAN MULTI -CRITERIA ANALYSIS APPROACH FEBRUARY 8 , 2022 | 1 Multi-Criteria Analysis Approach Cascadia will lead a qualitative multi-criteria analysis (MCA) of ~35 actions from the draft actions list to arrive at a prioritized shortlist for the City and Climate Action Planning Group (CAPG) consideration. The MCA assigns qualitative numerical scores to each evaluated action and criterion to arrive at an overall priority score for each action. This memo provides an overview of the proposed MCA approach. It includes:  An overview of the evaluation steps for the multi-criteria analysis.  Detailed descriptions of the evaluation criteria, including sub-criteria definitions and criteria weights. The Cascadia team and the CAPG developed the draft actions list, using the following key sources:  Review of City plans, policies, and programs  2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations  November CAPG meeting  November public workshop The initial actions list contained approximately 120 actions. Cascadia grouped similar actions together to improve implementation potential and clarify how the City plans to pursue resiliency. The draft actions list contains 71 actions. Approximately 35 actions are included in the consultant budget to perform the multi- criteria analysis. Therefore, CAPG prioritized which actions will be evaluated with the MCA; remaining actions can still be included in the Resiliency Plan, but will not include evaluation results. Appendix H PORT ANGELES RESILIENCY PLAN MULTI -CRITERIA ANALYSIS APPROACH FEBRUARY 8 , 2022 | 2 EVALUATION STEPS Briefly, the steps are: 1.To arrive at a priority score, each criterion is clearly defined and assigned a weight. These weightings are determined based on relative priorities as indicated by City staff, stakeholders, and the public. This includes survey input from CAPG members. Criteria are divided into subcriteria to inform the scoring process. These subcriteria ensure that the evaluation considers the various facets of the criterion; for example, “feasibility” could consider an array of constraints ranging from the City’s level of control, to regulatory, political, and technology constraints. 2.Cascadia develops qualitative score matrices to allow for a consistent, objective ranking process. We assign scores for each action based on the criteria definitions and professional judgement drawing from available literature, peer city case studies, our knowledge of City context, engagement results, and consultant experience. Our team also records a brief rationale for each action to provide further substantiation. Actions that land on different values for a subcriterion are assigned an average score; each criterion is evaluated on a 1 (low) to 5 (high) scale. 3.Cascadia uses priority scores to arrive at a prioritized shortlist of actions for inclusion in the Resiliency Plan. However, it is possible all actions will be moved forward, pending City discretion, CAPG direction, and other ongoing community and stakeholder input. Example: Distinguishing between two actions Below are two actions Cascadia evaluated to prepare the City of Everett’s (WA) Climate Action Plan (CAP). While both actions have the same impact, cost/affordability, and co-benefits scores, the second action is substantially more feasible and somewhat more equitable. As a result, the second action received an overall higher score and better achieves the City’s climate goals. Action Priority Score Impact Equity Cost/ Affordability Feasibility Co- benefits Advocate for regional congestion pricing authority. 2.6 4 1 4 2 3 Accelerate the implementation of the “Complete Streets” policy. 3.4 4 2 4 4 3 Example: Evaluating sub-criteria In this example, the action’s score for the Impact criterion would be based on where the action lies within the two subcriteria shown below. Appendix H PORT ANGELES RESILIENCY PLAN MULTI -CRITERIA ANALYSIS APPROACH FEBRUARY 8 , 2022 | 3 Score Impact Likely to address goals? Addressing a major need? 1 Voluntary/indirect action with limited reach/scaling Addresses a very minor need - very low emissions source or very low priority goal for City/community 2 Voluntary/indirect action with broad reach/scale Addresses a minor need - low emissions source or low priority goal for City/community 3 Voluntary/indirect, but with financial incentives Addresses an average need - average emissions source or average priority goal for City/community 4 Regulatory/infrastructure project, but with limited reach/scaling Addresses a higher-than-average need - high emissions source 5 Regulatory/infrastructure project with broad reach/scale Addresses a very major need - very high emissions source The action “improve incentives for electric heat pumps,” addresses the high emissions from the buildings sector (thus a 4 for “addressing a major need”) but is an incentive that is likely to have limited reach/scale (thus a 2 for “likely to address goals”). Therefore, the average score is a 3: Action Impact Likely to address goals? Addressing a major need? Total Impact Score Improve incentives for electric heat pumps. 2 4 3 Appendix H PORT ANGELES RESILIENCY PLAN MULTI -CRITERIA ANALYSIS APPROACH FEBRUARY 8 , 2022 | 4 EVALUATION CRITERIA Summary Based on input from CAPG, best practices, and our expertise and experience, Cascadia has proposed the following criteria to evaluate the draft strategies supporting the Port Angeles Resiliency Plan. Each subcriterion is evaluated on a 1 (low) to 5 (high) scale. Criterion Weight Definition/Subcriteria Impact 0.25 What is the scope and likelihood that the action will reduce GHG emissions or enhance resiliency? By when? Can impact be measured and tracked? Does the action address a major need (i.e., high GHG emissions source or climate risk)? Cost 0.20 What is the cost to the community and City? What are the costs of inaction for this action? Community Support 0.10 Do residents support/agree with the action? Do community stakeholders/partners support/agree with the action? Feasibility 0.15 What is the City's level of control over implementation? Are there regulatory, political, or technological constraints related to action implementation? Is the action adaptable to new technologies? Equity 0.20 Does the action reduce vulnerability for all populations? Is it fair? Are benefits distributed equitably across the community? Do they redress historic inequities? Co-benefits 0.10 Does the action support public health, the green economy, and healthy natural systems? Impact The three proposed subcriteria evaluate impact according to whether the action is focused on the City’s highest-emissions sources and/or greatest climate risks, how broadly the action would affect the City/community, how likely is it that the impact will be realized, the timeline of that impact, and the ease of measuring and tracking the impact. Likely to address goals (e.g., carbon neutrality by 2030; i.e., scope and likelihood of impact)? Addressing a major mitigation need? Addressing a major adaptation need? 1 Very Low - VOLUNTARY strategies (e.g., education/outreach, planning, assessments) that INDIRECTLY reduce emissions and/or enhance resilience; limited ability to scale (i.e., very low impact/reductions); will be difficult to measure/track impact. Addresses a very minor need - very low emissions source (water & wastewater, municipal) Addresses a very minor need - very low climate risk for City/community Appendix H PORT ANGELES RESILIENCY PLAN MULTI -CRITERIA ANALYSIS APPROACH FEBRUARY 8 , 2022 | 5 Likely to address goals (e.g., carbon neutrality by 2030; i.e., scope and likelihood of impact)? Addressing a major mitigation need? Addressing a major adaptation need? 2 Low – non-monetary incentives, regulation, or capital project that DIRECTLY reduce emissions and/or enhance resilience; VOLUNTARY with ability to scale (i.e., low impact/reductions); may be difficult to measure/track the impact. Addresses a minor need - low emissions source (energy) Addresses a minor need - low climate risk for City/community (extreme heat, extreme cold) 3 Moderate - VOLUNTARY/indirect programs that DIRECTLY reduce emissions and/or enhance resilience, but with FINANCIAL INCENTIVES (i.e., moderate impact/reductions); likely able to measure/track impact. Addresses an average need - average emissions source (waste, process & fugitive emissions) Addresses an average need - average climate risk for City/community (wildfire, grid resilience, supply chain; risks to part of the economy, i.e. disruption to people’s ability to provide goods and services) 4 High - REGULATORY/INFRASTRUCTURE projects that DIRECTLY reduce emissions and/or enhance resilience, but with limited reach/scaling by any year (if primarily adaptation) or with broad reach/scale that will be realized AFTER 2030 (if primarily mitigation, i.e., high impact/reductions); will be able to measure/track impact. Addresses a higher- than-average need - high emissions source Addresses a higher-than-average need - high climate risk for City/community (flooding; indirect risks to overburdened communities, e.g., advances ability to prepare for climate impacts (e.g., ed/outreach), plan that prioritizes managed retreat for low-income communities in flood areas; risks to most of economy, i.e. disruption to people’s ability to provide goods and services) 5 Very High - REGULATORY/INFRASTRUCTURE projects that DIRECTLY reduce emissions and/or enhance resilience with broad reach/scale in any year (if primarily adaptation) or that will be realized BY 2030 (if primarily mitigation, i.e., very high impact/reductions); will be able to measure/track impact. Addresses a very major need - very high emissions source (transportation, land use, consumption) Addresses a very major need - very high climate risk for City/community (shoreline change; direct risks to overburdened communities, e.g., build or provide access to in-home cooling or cooling centers, air filtration options; risks to entire economy, i.e., disruption to people’s ability to provide goods and services) Cost The cost criterion focuses on financial costs. The three proposed subcriteria assess affordability for the City and community, and the costs of inaction. Direct cost to community (over 10 years) Cost to city (including startup and ongoing maintenance for 10 years) Costs of inaction 1 Very high – SIGNIFICANT costs across the ENTIRE community Very high – MAJOR INFRASTRUCTURE/capital improvement project; generally >$10 million Very low – failing to implement this strategy will risk MINIMAL costs/damages to the community. Appendix H PORT ANGELES RESILIENCY PLAN MULTI -CRITERIA ANALYSIS APPROACH FEBRUARY 8 , 2022 | 6 Direct cost to community (over 10 years) Cost to city (including startup and ongoing maintenance for 10 years) Costs of inaction 2 High – SIGNIFICANT costs to SOME in the community High – MODERATE INFRASTRUCTURE projects and large programs; generally $1- 10 million Low – failing to implement this strategy will risk MODERATE costs/damages to SOME in the community. 3 Moderate – MODERATE costs across the community Moderate – SMALL INFRASTRUCTURE projects and LARGER PLANS, policies, and small programs; $100K-1 million Moderate – failing to implement this strategy will risk MODERATE costs/damages to the ENTIRE community. 4 Low – MINIMAL costs across the community Low – SIMPLE policy changes, studies, and small plans; <$100K High – failing to implement this strategy will risk SIGNIFICANT costs/damages to SOME in the community. 5 Very low – will NOT present any additional costs to the community; may save money. Very low – planning strategy or MINIMAL TO NO CITY INVESTMENT; City may already be working on it. Very high – failing to implement this strategy will risk SIGNIFICANT costs/damages to the ENTIRE community. Community Support Community support may vary among residents, stakeholders, and other partners (e.g., implementation partners like Clallam Transit, the business community, the environmental community). Therefore, we propose subcriteria tailored to these sectors of the community. The “stakeholder & partner support/agreement” subcriterion is intended to assess the level of political and other support from partners and stakeholders in the community; political support from government is assessed in the Feasibility criteria. To evaluate level of support, we consider input from CAPG and City staff input on community perspectives. We may also consider how an action is typically viewed in peer jurisdictions. For example, we may justify a rating by indicating that CAPG is strongly supportive, overall community support is mixed, and that these trends are consistent with peer jurisdictions. Resident support/agreement Stakeholder & partner support/agreement 1 Very low - MOST residents STRONGLY OPPOSE the strategy. Very low - MOST stakeholders/partners STRONGLY OPPOSE the action. 2 Low - SOME residents STRONGLY OPPOSE the strategy. Low - SOME stakeholders/partners STRONGLY OPPOSE the action. 3 Moderate - SOME residents OPPOSE and SOME SUPPORT the strategy. Moderate - SOME stakeholders/partners OPPOSE and SOME SUPPORT the action. 4 High – there is SUPPORT within the resident community. High – there is SUPPORT among stakeholders/partners for the action. 5 Very high - residents STRONGLY SUPPORT the strategy. Very high - stakeholders/partners STRONGLY SUPPORT the action. Appendix H PORT ANGELES RESILIENCY PLAN MULTI -CRITERIA ANALYSIS APPROACH FEBRUARY 8 , 2022 | 7 Feasibility The feasibility criteria assess the degree of City control over an action’s strategy success and the likely regulatory, political, and technological constraints to implementation. Political constraints are specific to those that are not covered by the Community Support criteria, which focuses on support from community partners and stakeholders such as Clallam Transit and the business, environmental, social justice, and other community perspectives. Political constraints assessed as part of Feasibility include the level of City Council support and direction, City staff support and capacity, the regulatory role and level of support of Clallam County, the level of support from local Tribes, alignment or reinforcement of other City, County, and regional policies, plans, programs, and initiatives (including opportunities for shared implementation), whether funding or other needed resources from state and federal entities is easily acquired, and whether the outcome of a legislative process may affect the feasibility of a strategy. When evaluating constraints, we consider both the number of likely constraints, the likely severity of the constraint, and how difficult the constraints may be to overcome, including how adaptable the action is to new technologies. For example, a rating of “moderate” could be selected if there are regulatory and political constraints (but no or minimal technological constraints) that would be moderately difficult to overcome. In cases where the variables are in two different ratings (e.g., unlikely to encounter challenges, but they would be moderately difficult to overcome), the brief rationale will explain the choice made. City role (i.e., level of control) Regulatory, political, technological constraints 1 Very low - City's role would be largely as ADVOCATE (i.e., action led by external implementing entity) Very high – action currently UNVIABLE given current regulations, politics, and/or technologies and anticipated opportunity windows. If encountered, challenges are VERY DIFFICULT or IMPOSSIBLE to overcome and/or unable to adapt to new technologies. 2 Low - City would be VOLUNTARY PARTNER with implementing entity High – action LIKELY to encounter challenges given current regulations, politics, and/or technologies and anticipated opportunity windows. If encountered, challenges are DIFFICULT to overcome and/or difficult to adapt to new technologies. 3 Moderate - City would be OFFICIAL PARTNER (e.g., MOU) with implementing entity Moderate – action MAY encounter challenges given current regulations, politics, and/or technologies and anticipated opportunity windows. If encountered, challenges are MODERATELY DIFFICULT to overcome and/or moderately difficult to adapt to new technologies. 4 High - City would be FUNDER of implementing entity Low – action UNLIKELY to encounter challenges given current regulations, politics, and/or technologies and anticipated opportunity windows. If encountered, some or most challenges are RELATIVELY EASY to overcome and/or are relatively easy to adapt to new technologies. 5 Very high - City would be IMPLEMENTER or REGULATOR Very low – MINIMAL to NO challenges anticipated given current regulations, politics, and/or technologies and anticipated opportunity Appendix H PORT ANGELES RESILIENCY PLAN MULTI -CRITERIA ANALYSIS APPROACH FEBRUARY 8 , 2022 | 8 City role (i.e., level of control) Regulatory, political, technological constraints windows. If encountered, most challenges are EASILY overcome and/or easily adaptive to new technologies. Equity The proposed equity subcriteria focus on reducing climate risks, historic inequities, and distributive justice. Procedural equity is addressed separately, primarily through development and implementation of the Resiliency Plan. Reduces vulnerability? Fair? Distribution of benefits 1 Very low - action will DEFINITELY INCREASE vulnerability for ALL and is UNFAIR to ALL Very low - ALL benefits and costs are accruing to different sectors of the community and are perpetuating historic inequities 2 Low - action DEFINITELY INCREASES vulnerability for SOME and is UNFAIR to SOME Low - SOME benefits and costs are accruing to different sectors of the community and are perpetuating historic inequities 3 Moderate/Neutral - action DOES NOT AFFECT VULNERABILITY or FAIRNESS Moderate/neutral - action DOES NOT distribute benefits and costs in the community in a way that perpetuates historic inequities 4 High - action DEFINITELY REDUCES vulnerability for SOME and is FAIR to SOME High - MOST benefits are accruing to the sectors of the community that face historic inequities; other sectors of the community may accrue benefits as well 5 Very high - action will DEFINITELY REDUCE vulnerability for ALL and is FAIR to ALL Very high – MOST or ALL benefits are accruing to the sectors of the community that face historic inequities; other sectors of the community accrue benefits as well Co-Benefits Many actions will have benefits beyond greenhouse gas emissions reduction or building climate resilience. Based on City input and context, we have prioritized public health, green economy, and healthy natural systems for evaluation in the MCA. All are very high priorities in the Port Angeles and will be evaluated separately to provide greater transparency around the implications of the Resiliency Plan:  Public health: Even prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, public health is a commonly evaluated co-benefit in climate action planning processes. To avoid double-counting, the equity components of public health are addressed in the equity criteria.  Green economy: A green economy preserves ecosystem functions while maintaining or strengthening quality of life; it achieves balance between forms of capital (i.e., natural, human, economic) and generates jobs and livelihoods locally and regionally that support greening the entire economy. Since other criteria evaluate natural and human capital, we focus this subcriterion on the economic components of the green economy (jobs, infrastructure, markets). The City’s most promising green sectors include: Appendix H PORT ANGELES RESILIENCY PLAN MULTI -CRITERIA ANALYSIS APPROACH FEBRUARY 8 , 2022 | 9 − Environmental engineering services (coastal and stormwater engineering) − Zero-waste management, including but not limited to increasing local composite recycling, establishing waste-to-energy facilities (if they have the proper controls in place to ensure net positive benefits to the environment and emissions reduction), and organics collection and processing into compost for local application. − Blue carbon / carbon-friendly port operations − Regenerative agriculture − Smallholder climate-friendly forestry  Healthy natural systems: Healthy natural systems includes the processes and functions that sustain health species, habitats, and ecosystems. Critical and high-priority ecosystems, habitats, and species in Port Angeles include but are not limited to salmon and their habitat, and kelp, eelgrass, and other seagrasses and their habitat. Supports public health. Supports a green economy (e.g., green jobs, infrastructure, and markets). Supports healthy natural systems (e.g., ecosystems, habitats, and species, and the processes, functions, etc. that sustain them). 1 Very low – NO to MINIMAL support for public health and may negatively affect public health. Very low - NO to MINIMAL investment in green jobs, infrastructure, and markets for City residents/businesses; NOT TARGETED or is minimally targeted to the City’s most promising green sectors (including education and workforce training). Very low – NO to MINIMAL support for healthy natural systems and may negatively affect natural systems. 2 Low – Benefits the public health of SOME, but the benefits are likely short-term (i.e., <1 month). Low – SOME investment in green jobs, infrastructure, and markets for City residents/businesses, but investment is NOT TARGETED or is minimally targeted to the City’s most promising green sectors (including education and workforce training). Low – INDIRECTLY supports healthy natural systems of any size or priority; benefits expected to last <5 years and/or be limited in reach/scale 3 Moderate – Benefits the public health of SOME for some time (i.e., 1 month to a few years) or benefits the public health of a SIGNIFICANT portion of the population, but the benefits are likely short-term (i.e., <1 month) Moderate – SOME investment in green jobs, infrastructure, and markets for City residents/businesses; SOME investment is TARGETED to the City’s most promising green sectors (including education and workforce training). Moderate – DIRECTLY supports SOME healthy natural systems, which may or may not be deemed critical or high- priority in a plan or directive; benefits expected to be short- term (i.e., 5-10 years) and/or limited in reach/scale Appendix H PORT ANGELES RESILIENCY PLAN MULTI -CRITERIA ANALYSIS APPROACH FEBRUARY 8 , 2022 | 10 Supports public health. Supports a green economy (e.g., green jobs, infrastructure, and markets). Supports healthy natural systems (e.g., ecosystems, habitats, and species, and the processes, functions, etc. that sustain them). 4 High – Persistently benefits the public health of SOME (i.e., 5+ years) or benefits the public health of a SIGNIFICANT portion of the population for some time (i.e., 1 month to a few years). High – SIGNIFICANT investment in green jobs, infrastructure, and markets for City residents/businesses; SIGNIFICANT investment is TARGETED to the City’s most promising green sectors (including education and workforce training). High – SIGNIFICANTLY and DIRECTLY supports SOME healthy natural systems, a few of which are deemed CRITICAL or HIGH- PRIORITY in a plan or directive; benefits expected to be short- term (i.e., 5-10 years) but broad in reach/scale 5 Very high – Persistently benefits the public health of a SIGNIFICANT portion of the population (i.e., >5 years). Very high – VERY SIGNIFICANT investment in green jobs, infrastructure, and markets for City residents/businesses; MOST or all investment is TARGETED to the City’s most promising green sectors (including education and workforce training). Very high – SIGNIFICANTLY and DIRECTLY supports MANY healthy natural systems or SIGNIFICANTLY and DIRECTLY supports CRITICAL or HIGH- PRIORITY healthy natural systems of any size; benefits expected to persist (i.e., >10 years) and be broad in reach/scale Criteria Weights We propose the following criteria weights, based on input from CAPG via a survey and feedback from City staff and Planning Commission on the MCA approach. CAPG survey respondents answered two questions about criteria weights, one qualitative and the other quantitative (see results below). We gave the quantitative results greater influence in the weighting, since the question more strongly encouraged consideration of tradeoffs. Respondents to both questions rated impact highest, followed by “other” (qualitative question) and equity (quantitative, points-based question). The “other” criteria suggested in the survey included a focus on the most vulnerable, viewing resiliency from the lens of ROI and cost-benefit, and aligning with other North Olympic Peninsula plans, neighboring jurisdictions, and businesses. The first one is addressed in the subcriteria for equity. The ROI approach is addressed by the MCA itself, as impact will be rated most highly and actions with high impact and low cost will be easily discerned in the results. Criterion Weighting Rationale Impact 0.25 Highest rated in both questions; highest priority for City; primary purpose of the Resiliency Plan Cost 0.2 Third-highest rated in the points question, but lowest rated in the qualitative question, which suggests an average; high priority for City Appendix H PORT ANGELES RESILIENCY PLAN MULTI -CRITERIA ANALYSIS APPROACH FEBRUARY 8 , 2022 | 11 Feasibility 0.15 Overall lowest rating across both questions, but still ~3 out of 5; high priority for City Equity 0.2 Highly rated in both questions; about two-thirds of the rating of Impact in the points question Community support 0.1 Rated slightly behind cost in points question, but higher in qualitative question; priority for CAPG Co-benefits 0.1 Lowest-rated in the points question, but highest rated (after impact and equity) in the qualitative question; not a significant emphasis among City staff; suggests an average comparable to community support Survey results CAPG members evaluated criteria weights in two ways:  Qualitatively, by being asked what they thought was most important to consider when choosing actions to build resiliency to climate impacts and reduce carbon pollution in Port Angeles.  Quantitatively, by being asked to assign 20 points to indicate what is most important to consider when evaluating actions and narrowing down an actions list. Results from the points-based question show a strong preference for impact; the remaining criteria evened out in their ratings compared to the qualitative question. Appendix H PORT ANGELES RESILIENCY PLAN MULTI -CRITERIA ANALYSIS APPROACH FEBRUARY 8 , 2022 | 12 Figure 1. Responses to the qualitative question about criteria weights. Appendix H PORT ANGELES RESILIENCY PLAN MULTI -CRITERIA ANALYSIS APPROACH FEBRUARY 8 , 2022 | 13 Figure 2. Responses to the quantitative, points-based question. Appendix H Document Preparation Next ID:0.25 0.20 0.15 0.10 0.20 0.10 FocusArea Strategy ActionShortName ActionDescription ActionSource ActionLever ActionScope Likely to address goals? Major climate mitigation need? Major climate adaptation need? Impact Score Rationale Community costs City costs Costs of inaction Cost Score Rationale City role Reg, political, tech constraints Feasibility Score Rationale Resident support Stakeholder / partner support Support Score Rationale Reduces vulnerability? Fair? Distribution of benefits Equity Score Rationale Public health Green economy Natural systems Co-Benefits Score Rationale Impact Avg Cost Avg Feasibility Avg Community Support Avg Equity Avg Co-Benefits Avg Compiled Priority Score Keep? (Y/N)New Action # Community Resilience & Wellbeing Increase community adaptive capacity City price on carbon Assess the role of carbon pricing in driving equity and resilience outcomes. Build explicit price of carbon in city procurement decisions 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations Reg B 4 2 4 3.3 Regulatory program that directly reduces emissions, thus rated as highly likely to address goals. Action is related to energy so is a minor need, and addresses a higher than average need which is advancing the ability for communities to prepare for climate change. 2 3 3 2.7 Will likely pose significant costs to the some of the community (business owners with high GHG emissions) and moderate costs to the city, and failing to implement action would also be moderate. 5 2 3.5 City will be implementor and regulator and Council/City staff identified constraints and hesitations. 2 2 2.0 Some CAPG/PC members strongly oppose this action. 2 2 2.0 Pricing carbon might actually harm some small businesses that don't have the capacity to become more green and create a cost burden. 3 4 2 3.0 Indirectly supports natural systems, but will likely result in a significant number of new green energy jobs and moderately benefit significant portions of the population in the short term by cleaning air quality. 3.33 2.67 3.50 2.00 2.00 3.00 2.8 Y 1 Community Resilience & Wellbeing Increase community adaptive capacity Local food security Make Port Angeles food secure by promoting sustainable agriculture and multiple sources for food procurement. This may include: *Partner with NODC to designate funding to promote and establish urban sustainable agriculture/food forests. *Encourage partnerships between local farms/farmers and residents to establish local food production projects. * Create agreement and resource availability systems for allowing gardening for food, habitat, or both in the right-of-way (e.g., planting strips). *Explore the feasibility of water utility pricing incentives and grey water to conserve and reuse water. 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations Cap C 3 2 4 3.0 Action is a mix of partnerships, incentives, and proposed regulation, with an overall focus on incentives. Small-scale ag has a small carbon storage potential and will somewhat reduce consumption. Food insecurity and lack of nutritious food are indirect risks to overburdened communities; there is also a small supply chain resiliency benefit. 3 3 2 2.7 Action will result in moderate costs to the community to pay for urban ag, even with funding. Will likely result in moderate costs to the city to fund projects (not a higher score because partnering with NODC will lower costs to the City). Cost of inaction is likely low, as it will pose moderate cost increases to some of the community. 3 5 4.0 City would be official partner. Likely minimal to no challenges in implementing. 5 5 5.0 Strong support the community 4 3 3.5 Reduces vulnerability to farmers (part of the population) and doesn't perpetuate historic inequities however doesn't accrue benefits to those that face historic inequities. 4 3 3 3.3 Directly benefits public health of farmers and indirectly benefits the rest of the community. Will likely spur some green jobs and will directly support some healthy natural systems, however they may not be critical areas, and these benefits are likely short- term. 3.00 2.67 4.00 5.00 3.50 3.33 3.4 Y 2 Community Resilience & Wellbeing Increase community adaptive capacity Climate migration preparation Assess climate migration impacts with forecasting every 5 years. Integrate those findings into the Comprehensive Plan, infrastructure plans, revenue forecasting, and housing assessments. CAPG Recommendation Reg C 5 1 5 3.7 Action is soley a resilience action, thus is rated a 2 in climate mitigation. Is very likely to address goals as it directly enhances resilience on a broad scale. Addresses climate change broadly which is a very high climate risk for the community. 5 4 5 4.7 Will likely result in no cost to the community, and low cost to the City to update comp plan, and the cost of inaction is very high to the entire community. 5 2 3.5 City will be main implementer. Will likely not encounter challenges, and if they do they will likely be relatively easy to overcome 3 3 3.0 No comments from CAPG/PC 5 3 4.0 Reduces vulnerability to everyone and benefits will seemingly be distributed evenly across the community. 5 3 2 3.3 Indirectly supports natural systems and will likely result in some investment in green infrastructure, targeted at land use. Will benefit public health of the whole community for indefinite future 3.67 4.67 3.50 3.00 4.00 3.33 3.8 Y 4 Buildings & Energy Mitigate energy-related GHG emissions Net metering monitoring Monitor net-metering uses to track progress, growth, and changes. Incentivize large, private energy users (Port of PA, Olympic Medical Center, etc.) to disclose their energy use per building. 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations Reg B 4 2 1 2.3 Will likely address goals as it is a regulatory action that will reduce emissions. It addresses a minor need (energy) and since it is a purely emissions reduction action, scored a 1 in adaptation 4 3 3 3.3 Will be costly to private companies in PA, will cost the city a moderate amount to fund incentives, and cost of inaction will likely be moderate. 5 4 4.5 City will be implementor and regulator and is unlikely to encounter challenges. 4 4 4.0 Seems to be support from CAPG/PC 3 3 3.0 Does not harm or benefit equity 2 2 2 2.0 Indirectly supports public health and natural systems, and might spur some green jobs to meter use. 2.33 3.33 4.50 4.00 3.00 2.00 3.1 N Buildings & Energy Mitigate energy-related GHG emissions Green Building standards Develop climate-smart Green Building standards for all City-owned buildings and develop a green building program. This should include: -Climate-smart permitting: Incorporate future climate change scenarios when calculating level of service for permitting city facilities and services. -LEED (or comparable, e.g., Living Building Challenge (LBC)) certification: Build all new City buildings and develop sites to at least a LEED Silver criterion for energy, water and waste conservation strategies (e.g. Architecture 2030, LBC certification). -Conduct energy audits for each city or county owned buildings and infrastructure (includes hospitals and school districts) to develop and implement a plan to reduce energy consumption. Instate a fee for properties that do not meet their audit targets. 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations Reg M 5 2 1 2.7 Action is likely to address goals as it will significantly reduce emissions, and addresses a minor mitigation need which is energy (although would this need be higher since it is also buildings ?) and since it is purely an emissions reduction action, the adaptation need is a 1 5 1 3 3.0 Cost to the community is likely minimal to none because action is targeted at city owned buildings, cost to the city is likely very high and cost of inaction is likely moderate. 5 3 4.0 Support from Council but may be some constraints. 2 2 2.0 Some hesitation from CAPG/PC members that emissions reduction potential is negligible and costly. 3 3 3.0 Does not harm or benefit equity PJ - would vulnerable populations bear the brunt of increased development costs associated with LEED certifications? 4 5 2 3.7 Benefits public health of those who work/live in city owned buildings, definately supports green jobs and will indirectly support natural systems. 2.67 3.00 4.00 2.00 3.00 3.67 3.0 N Community Resilience & Wellbeing Increase community adaptive capacity Water supply monitoring & enhancement Work with county and state partners to identify monitoring needs and enhance water supply monitoring. (e.g., improve forecasting for future water supply and demand under climate change, study ways to enhance water storage and groundwater aquifer recharge in the city). This includes developing and implementing a local groundwater strategy that includes study of the local aquifer and actions to address groundwater issues near bluffs. 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations SPP C 3 1 4 2.7 Is a purely resilience action thus is rated very low for mitigation need. Will likely moderately address goals as it is voluntary but directly increases resilience. Likely addresses a higher than average adaptation need as water supply will become more scarce with increased temps. 5 3 2 3.3 Will likely incur no costs to the community, and moderate costs to the City (partnership with the county/state will reduce costs). Water is seemily a low priority for the City and thus the cost of inaction is most likely moderate. 3 4 3.5 City will likely be official partner. City staff and Council are supportive of this action and don't forsee any significant challenges. 4 4 4.0 Support from community to work with state and regional entities to implement this action. 5 4 4.5 By monitoring and ensuring stable future water access will benefit everyone, particularly those who are already experiencing difficulty accessing clean water. 5 3 2 3.3 Stable water supply will benefit everyones health in the long-term and will likely support some green jobs. Will not necessarily support natural systems directly, however. 2.67 3.33 3.50 4.00 4.50 3.33 3.5 Y 5 Community Resilience & Wellbeing Increase community adaptive capacity SLR vulnerability assessment of City assets Conduct a sea level rise evaluation in conjunction with Clallam County and the NODC to evaluate the vulnerability of City assets including roads (motorized & non), other infrastructure (sewage treatment, water, buildings), and marine access. This includes: -Reference the City Emergency Mitigation Plan to identify vulnerable infrastructure. -Analyze sewer system capacity and vulnerability to sea level rise, and identify actions to increase resilience -Evaluate roads and structures along bluff crests for erosion threat with SLR for planned retreat and ecosystem restoration; minimize realignment and protection -Identify areas for action through the Capital Facilities Plan 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations SPP M 2 1 5 2.7 Addressing threatened infrastructure primary purpose of the Resiliency Plan 4 4 5 4.3 Cost of inaction would present significant damage to the community. 4 5 4.5 The City will be working in partnership with other entities but the lead on City infrastructure. 4 4 4.0 Stakeholders rely on functional infrastructure and are very likely to support. 3 3 3.0 Benefits of functional infrastructure affect all. 4 3 3 3.3 Getting people out of hazard zones is a major benefit to public health. Clean water and reliable infrastructure provides multiple co- benefits 2.67 4.33 4.50 4.00 3.00 3.33 3.5 Y 6 Strategy & Action Descriptions Multi-Criteria Analysis (MCA)MCA Score Summary Reviewer Input Impact Cost Feasibility Community Support Equity Co-Benefits Appendix I Community Resilience & Wellbeing Increase community adaptive capacity City asset vulnerability tool Create tool to evaluate vulnerability of City assets, projects and activities. Incorporate tool into City workflow (e.g. permits and expenditures), updates of the Hazard Mitigation Plan, and Capital Facilities Plan. Include training for City staff, Council, and committees in the use fo the tool. 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations Vol M 2 1 3 2.0 Addresses hazards to major City infrastructure but does not adapt them for climate change or provide funding mechanism for the adaptation process. 5 4 3 4.0 Failing to implement this plan identify top priorities for climate adaptation of City infrastructure. 5 4 4.5 4 4 4.0 4 3 3.5 3 2 2 2.3 Planning tool has broad but small effect on public health, may support engineering services, and indirectly supports natural system health. 2.00 4.00 4.50 4.00 3.50 2.33 3.3 Y 8 Community Resilience & Wellbeing Increase community adaptive capacity Comprehensive climate outreach & education Develop comprehensive climate climate outreach & education programs. The city will partner with NODC to leverage resources for technical and expert advice plus outreach and education. This includes: - Renewable energy tours: Create a "renewable energy" or "energy efficiency" home tour, like a neighborhood garden tour or Master Gardener program, for neighbors to learn from each other on how to implement renewable energy or energy efficient upgrades in their homes. - Host community conversations in climate vulnerable locations to educate and train community on how to adapt to those climate impacts. - Involve high school students in climate work and developing a yearly “Climate Action Report Card." - Partner with environmental education organizations such as AmeriCorps or the County Health Department on major climate-related events to raise awareness and increase adoption of climate-friendly activities, beginning with a Climate Week d f d d Vol C 1 1 4 2.0 Is purely a resilience action thus is rated a 1 for mitigation, and is a voluntary education/outreach action thus has very low likelihood of addressing goals. Addresses a higher than average adaptation need as it advances the ability to prepare for climate impacts. 5 4 4 4.3 Will likely cost nothing to the community, and will require some funding from the city but not much. Cost of inaction is high for those in the community who have little to no knowledge on climate change and adaptation measures. 3 5 4.0 City will be a technical advisor and official partner. Strongly supported by city staff and council, and no constraints identified. 3 3 3.0 No comments from CAPG/PC 5 5 5.0 Will benefit everyone, but particularly to those who are most impacted by climate change and would benefit from climate education. 5 3 2 3.3 Climte change education will build community resilience, in turn benefitting public health for the whole community for over 5 years. Some jobs may be created via educational opportunities, and natural systems will indirectly benefit from increased knowledge and awareness of ecosystems/cli mate change. 2.00 4.33 4.00 3.00 5.00 3.33 3.6 Y 9 Community Resilience & Wellbeing Increase community adaptive capacity Housing Action Plan implementation Implement key provisions of the Port Angeles Housing Action Plan. This includes: - Implement Cottage Housing Development (CHD) that allows small lot single family housing developers to construct these types of housing products in feasible and appropriate single family neighborhoods including Residential Single Family (RS-7, RS-9, and RS-11) zones where the added density will benefit from walkable distances to existing transit, school, employment, community facility, and other supporting services. (Complete) - Expand the definition of allowable innovative, functional, and cost effective housing products such as duplex, attached single family, town or row houses, tandem houses, manor houses, congregate housing, micro housing, small efficiency dwelling units (SEDU), and mixed-use structures among others in the Residential Medium Density (RMD) and Residential High Density (RHD) zones. - Complete - Subdivide land into parcels that may be ll h h i i l ifi d Port Angeles Housing Action Plan Reg C 4 1 5 3.3 Is regulatory project that will directly enhance resilience. Action is a resilience action so mitigation is 1 but action addresses a major need and is thu scored 5 for adaptation need. 4 3 4 3.7 Cost to the community is likely minimal, cost to the city is likely moderate as it is a larger plan, and cost of inaction is likely large as will damage parts of the community that are the most vulnerable. 5 3 4.0 City will be implementer and is moderately likely to experience some political pushback, however many actions are already completed. 5 4 4.5 Support from CAPG/PC members 5 5 5.0 Reduces vulnerability to those who face historic inequities. 5 4 2 3.7 Significantly benefits public health, will likely spur some green jobs might indirectly support some natural systems 3.33 3.67 4.00 4.50 5.00 3.67 4.0 Y 11 Community Resilience & Wellbeing Increase community adaptive capacity Hazard Mitigation Plan implementation Implement key provisions of the 2019 Hazard Mitigation Plan: - Promote FireWise building design for construction in the Vision Master Plan and Housing Programs. - Develop alternate water supplies to provide reserve water sources to be used in event of drought or water shortage. - Develop advanced warning systems. - Identify Elders and other vulnerable populations to prioritize for mitigation and disaster assistance. - Develop and/or improve Emergency Plans such as Evacuation Plans, Tribal Records Protection Plan, Continuity of Operations Plan, etc. - Update flood assessment. - Create and expand water efficiency/conservation programs. 2019 Hazard Mitigation Plan SPP C 2 1 3 2.0 Does not address emissions 4 2 4 3.3 Failing to implement will risk significant costs/damages to SOME in the community. 3 4 3.5 City likely to officially partner with County to implement. 4 4 4.0 4 4 4.0 Addresses needs of a vulnerable community. Landslide/floo ding areas generally located in western PA, which is lower income (noting some homes downtown and along bluffs and shorelines that are more affluent). 5 4 3 4.0 2.00 3.33 3.50 4.00 4.00 4.00 3.3 Y 12 Community Resilience & Wellbeing Prepare for extreme events Wildfire urban interface Provide education and incentives for new construction and incentivize existing buildings to install venting and other features that resist ember wash ignition. 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations Reg C 4 1 3 2.7 Mitigation is a 1 as this is purely a resilience action and addresses an average adaptation need (wildfires). Has a high likelyhood of addressing goals as it directly enhances resilience and is a regulatory action, but the scope of those who are reached is likely limited. 3 4 4 3.7 Might add additional cost to housing developers and to houses who need to install venting Will likely result in low cost to the city as it is a simple policy chage. Cost of inaction is will impact some of the population moderately (i.e., with older homes and those constructing new homes) Cost of inaction is high for those who live in forested areas and are at high risk of wildfires. 5 5 5.0 City would be main implementer and funder. City staff and council seem are supportive and did not identify any anticipated challenges. 3 3 3.0 Identified as a low priority action from CAPG/PC 4 3 3.0 Reduces vulnerability to those in fire prone areas. Doesn't perpetuate historic inequities, but doesntly necessarily benefit those communities either. 3 3 2 2.7 Will benefit the public health of those living in fire prone areas and may indirectly benefit natural systems by reducing avoidable fire risk. Might create some green jobs. 2.67 3.67 5.00 3.00 3.50 2.67 3.4 Y 13 Community Resilience & Wellbeing Prepare for extreme events Climate resilience & emergency planning Continue to collaborate with emergency planning partners to: - Integrate climate considerations into emergency and hazard mitigation planning. - Implement city-wide emergency planning exercises and education (i.e., Map Your Neighborhood) to build community resilience during emergency events. - Create climate resiliency hubs at key locations (e.g., library) to support residents during extreme events such as flooding or heat waves. November 2021 CAPG Meeting SPP C 3 1 3 2.3 Action is purely a resilience action thus is rated a 1 for mitigation. Is moderately likely to address goals as the action is voluntary, directly benefits resilience and is trackable. Addressses a average adaptation need. 5 4 5 4.7 Will likely cost the community nothing and the city a bit to implement city- wide emergency planning excercises and education and amend haz mit. plan. Cost of inaction is high as the communtiy may experience otherwise avoidable damages if not prepared for emergencies. 5 4 4.5 City would be implemeter and is action is unlikely to encounter constraints. 4 4 4.0 Support from CAPG/PC members 5 3 4.0 Action does not specifically benefit a certain group of people or community but will reduce vulnerabilities to everyone. 5 3 2 3.3 Indirectly benefits natural systems (considering climate change in the haz mit plan will likely provide more accurate predictions as to which critical areas/ecosyste ms will be harmed). Everyones health will benefit from increased emergency response education, and minimal jobs may be created through d i l 2.33 4.67 4.50 4.00 4.00 3.33 3.7 Y 14 Ecosystem Health Increase opportunities for carbon sequestration and storage Forest and marine habitat preservation Partner with organizations and individuals (e.g., National Marine Sanctuary, Olympic NPS/NF, NOAA, PSP WA DNR, WA DFW, FMLC, and private timber landholders) and the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe to preserve forest and marine habitats, developing new strategies where needed. Workshop action 5 5 5 5.0 Preservation of carbon sequestration, habitats, ecosystem services. 4 4 2 3.3 The partnerships have the potentail to produce large benefits with very little cost/investment through partnerships. 3 2 2.5 Potential for constraints to be encountered but political will is shifting and challenges would likely be overcome. 4 5 4.5 Large number of partnerships indicative of community and regional support. 5 3 4.0 Will benefit all. 2 5 5 4.0 Minimal benefits to public health, greater benefits to green economy and preservation of natural systems functioning. 5.00 3.33 2.50 4.50 4.00 4.00 3.9 Y 15 Ecosystem Health Restore and protect natural habitat Urban tree canopy, parks, and open space Protect urban tree canopy, parks, and open space. This may include: - Develop a tree protection ordinance that emphasizes older trees - Incentivize urban tree planting, especially in public areas (e.g., street planting strips) 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations Reg 4 1 2 2.3 Action is mainly a resilience action and is in the natual system sector thus is rated low for mitigation, however has a high likelihood of addressing goals as it is a regulatory project that directly benefits resilience reduces GHG emissions. Adaptation is scored 2 as it addresses a minor need 3 3 5 3.7 Will likely impose some higher costs to developers by limiting areas for development, and will cost the will impose moderate costs to the community to plant trees. Will likely incur moderate costs to the city to develop ordinance and incentivize urban tree planting. Cost of inaction is high for animals, vegetation and failing to implement will likely exacerbate heat island ff hi h 5 5 5.0 City will be implementer. Council and staff are supportive of action and didn't identify any constraints. 4 4 4.0 Support from CAPG/PC members 4 3 3.5 Protecting urban tree canopies equally in the city will benefit areas and communities with the least amount of green spaces (usually underserved communities as research shows richer communities have more green spaces). 5 2 5 4.0 Access to green areas is proven to benefit mental and physical health, thus this action will persistently benefit public health of a significant portion of the population for over 5 years. Tree planting job/volunteer opportunities will arise, but likely not a ton of green job opportunities. Action directly supports many natural systems/areas. 2.33 3.67 5.00 4.00 3.50 4.00 3.6 Y 16 Appendix I Community Resilience & Wellbeing Prepare for extreme events Flood vulnerability and risk Work with state partners to encourage FEMA to incorporate climate change in rate maps and guidance. 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations SPP C 2 1 3 2.0 Addresses an important need but action is indirect and steps away from results that will enable climate adaptation. 5 5 3 4.3 FEMA mapping that included SLR would not cost the community and the results would not change the ris to the community from SLR flooding. However, the results could provide funding opportunities for later adaptation. 1 4 2.5 Very little involvement or resistance is likely 4 4 4.0 4 3 3.5 Sea level rise would primarily affect the communitities near the waterfront, whom rarely suffer from historic inequitities. Updated flood maps may better inform vulnerability of western PA communities, which were cut off during recent atmospheric rivers. 1 1 1 1.0 The assessment will have little change on the existing and future hazards of SLR. 2.00 4.33 2.50 4.00 3.50 1.00 2.9 N Ecosystem Health Restore and protect natural habitat Native plant landscaping Incentivize use of native plants landscaping in residential, commercial, and indistrial settings within the City (e.g. partner with the County, Clallam Conservation District, and Lower Elwah Klallam Tribe's Natural Resources Department). 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations 3 1 1 1.7 Is moderately likely to address goals as it is voluntary with incentives but doesn't address a major mitigation or adaptation need. 3 3 1 2.3 Will likely result in moderate costs to the community to plant native vegetation, and will require some investment from the city but not much as they will partner with other entities. The cost of inaction will likely be very low. 5 4 4.5 City is regulator and implementer, and seems unlikely there will be challenges per council/staff feedback 3 3 3.0 No comments from CAPG/PC so neither support nor opposition 3 3 3.0 Action does not particularly reduce vulnerabilities for or benefit communities nor harm them. 4 1 3 2.7 Natural systems will directly benefit from native vegetation however the scope is limited and the action isn't targeted at critical areas. Community wide public health will benefit from increased green spaces, and these benefits are likely to persist for some time. This action, however, will likely not support many green jobs. 1.67 2.33 4.50 3.00 3.00 2.67 2.7 Y 17 Ecosystem Health Restore and protect natural habitat Critical area protection Add climate impact overlays to existing “Critical Areas”. Create critical area flood mapping beyond FEMA’s historical flood data to inform future development and support prohibition of permanent infrastructure in those areas. 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations Reg 2 1 4 2.3 The regulatory approach could help plan for and prevent climate hazards and prevent new development in hazardous locations. 4 4 4 4.0 Prevent future development in climate hazard zones. 3 4 3.5 DOE has been laying the path for CAO integration of climate change for years. The public is increasingly accepting of the science. 4 4 4.0 Assumed that there is community support for this action. 4 2 3.0 Most development along shorelines is by communities that have not faced historic inequalities. 4 1 4 3.0 Reducing new development in areas vulnerable to climate would provide long- lasting benefits. Minimal benefits to green economy.. 2.33 4.00 3.50 4.00 3.00 3.00 3.2 Y 19 Ecosystem Health Restore and protect natural habitat Coastal erosion reduction Encourage soft armoring of shorelines to protect infrastructure and habitat, particularly along Ediz Hook. Implement native vegetation and other natural resource management practices to reduce landslides and coastal erosion 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations SPP 3 2 5 3.3 Beach nourishment would increase resilience and enable translation of coastal wetlands. Soft shore is not appropriate on bluffs and landslide areas. 3 3 4 3.3 Beach nourishment will increase the resilience and decrease the vulnerability of shores/ habitats to coastal flooding. 5 4 4.5 Some uncertaintly on this one. 3 3 3.0 3 3 3.0 Most development along shorelines is by communities that have not faced historic inequalities. 3 3 4 3.3 Greatest benefit to natural systems, including eelgrass/salt marsh along leeward/PA side of Ediz Hook. 3.33 3.33 4.50 3.00 3.00 3.33 3.4 Y 20 Ecosystem Health Restore and protect natural habitat Shoreline Master Program updates Incorporate climate change more explicitly into the Shoreline Master Program. 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations Reg 2 1 4 2.3 The regulatory approach could help plan for and prevent climate hazards. 5 4 4 4.3 This rulatory approach will enable safer setback distances and prevent poor planning in the future. 3 4 3.5 DOE has been laying the path for SMP integration of climate change for years. The public is increasingly accepting of the science. 4 4 4.0 Assumed that there is community support for this action. 4 2 3.0 Most development along shorelines is by communities that have not faced historic inequalities. 4 1 4 3.0 Reducing new development in areas vulnerable to climate would provide long- lasting benefits. Minimal benefits to green economy.. 2.33 4.33 3.50 4.00 3.00 3.00 3.3 Y 21 Ecosystem Health Restore and protect natural habitat Salmon habitat protection Work with local ecological restoration partners (e.g., Clallam County Streamkeepers) to monitor and analyze climate change impact at salmon stream restoration sites and 6 creeks in the City. Use the Habitat Recovery Pilot Program to support restoration efforts. 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations SPP 1 1 5 2.3 Monitoring does not result in climate adaptation. 4 5 1 3.3 Low/no cost. 1 5 3.0 Very easy to implement. 5 4 4.5 Stakeholders and partners suppport this use of existing data. Increased residential support score based on workshop 2 feedback. 3 3 3.0 Monitoring will not affect equity. 1 2 5 2.7 Engineering services may be employed; salmon are a high-priority critical habitat 2.33 3.33 3.00 4.50 3.00 2.67 3.0 Y 23 Transportation Decrease transportation GHG emissions Transit infrastructure, equity, & safety Support Clallam Transit in expanding public transit infrastructure and services to ensure access to buses available at all times and decrease the need for travel in single-occupany vehicles. This includes: - Develop strategies that promote transit equity and community safety by considering the most vulnerable, then design and implement transit to support pedestrians, bicycles, mass transit and individual cars, in that order. - Increase use of the park and ride system - Implement fare-free transit within Port Angeles city limits - Explore a high-occupancy vehicle lane on Highway 101 between Carlsborg and the Port Angeles UGA - Reference Clallam Transit's Comprehensive Operational Analysis for implementation 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations Cap C 5 5 1 3.7 Assesses a major mitigation need (transportation) and soley reduces GHG emissions, thus is rated low for adaptation. Action has a very high likelihood of addresssing goals as it is a capital infrastructure project that directly reduces emissions. 5 1 3 3.0 Will likely cost little to nothing for the community and may save money for public transit riders. Will likely cost the city a significant amount, even if partnering with Clallam Transit. Cost of inaction is likely moderate, as failing to make incentivize and ease the transition away from SOVs and toward alternative transit modes will continue increasing transportation emissions which h 4 3 3.5 Wasn't sure whether City role should be rated 4 or 5 but because they are supporting Clallam Transit and not necessariy doing the implementing I rated as a 4. Might experience some pushback with, for example, fare free transit and other actions that could be seen as raising taxes. 3 3 3.0 Moderate support from the community. 5 5 5.0 Will benefit all, particularly those living in historically underserved communities and low income individuals. 4 5 1 3.3 Increasing access to public transit and thus improving quality of life will benefit many communities for a long time. Building road infrastructure will support many green jobs. However, development of new infrastructure will likely not support healthy natural systems and may infact harm habitats in undeveloped areas. 3.67 3.00 3.50 3.00 5.00 3.33 3.7 Y 30 Appendix I Transportation Decrease transportation GHG emissions Increase EV use for general public Work with Peninsula Regional Transportation Planning Organization (PRTPO) to develop strategies and expand infrastructure to increase use of electric vehicles. This includes: - Develop and implement an EV infrastructure plan - Identify top barriers to EV adoption and develop plan to address them - Explore changes to code to incentivize or require EV charging in municipal facilities and some land use zones (in exceedance of current state law) 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations Cap C 5 5 1 3.7 Has a very high likelihood of addressing goals as it is a capital infrastructure project that will result in direct GHG emissions reductions that is broad reaching. Transportation is a major mitigation need for the city, thus is scored a 5. It is a soley emissions reduction action, thus the adaptation need is a 1. 5 3 5 4.3 Cost to the city is likely moderate as they will need to develop and fund the EV development plan (the cost of funding the strategies would be a significant amount, but because the action is only saying to develop strategies and not necessarily implement them, I put the cost as only moderate). Cost of inaction is high, as transportation emissions account for a large chunk of PAs emissions d 5 4 4.5 City will be main implementer adn regulator (even with partnership), and City staff and council did not identify any constraints 3 3 3.0 No comments from CAPG/PC so neither support nor opposition 4 2 3.0 Certain parts of the community will benefit from increase EV use and infrastructure, but this will largely be folks with moderate- high income. Thus, this action may harm those who do not have the $ to afford EVs. 1 4 2 2.3 Minimal support to public health, but action will likely support a significant amount of green jobs and will indirectly support natural systems by bettering air quality. 3.67 4.33 4.50 3.00 3.00 2.33 3.6 Y 31 Transportation Decrease transportation GHG emissions Biking and walking infrastructure Develop and expand infrastructure to support biking, walking, and e-mobility (e.g., scooters), including walkability and bikeability across highways, busy interchanges, and other busy streets (e.g., Blyn). 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations Cap C 4 5 1 3.3 Building ped/bike infrastructure will directly reduce GHG emissions and thus is very likely to address goals. Action addresses transportatoin which is a very major mitigation need, this rated a 5. Because it will soley reduce GHG emissions, it scores a 1 on adaptation need. 5 2 1 2.7 New infrastructure will likely result in high costs to the city; didn't rate a 1 because City staff comment about leveraging state/federal funding. Likely minimal to no costs to the community. Cost of inaction is likely very low, however would result in externalities from transportation emissions. 5 3 4.0 City will be implementer and regulator. May experience some challenges. 5 5 5.0 Large support from CAPG+PC. 3 3 3.0 Action doesn't have direct equity considerations so it neither benefits or harms vulnerability to the population. If infrastructure was explicitly expanded to overburdened communitites, the scores would likely change to 4's. 4 4 1 3.0 Building ped/bike routes will largely benefit public and mental health of those who have access to the routes, and will support green infrastructure. However, development of these routes will likely negatively impact habitats. 3.33 2.67 4.00 5.00 3.00 3.00 3.4 Y 32 Transportation Decrease transportation GHG emissions Municipal fleet electrification & idle reduction Support and incentivize electrification and lower emissions of transportation in the City: - Create incentives to move City transportation fleet toward electrification in order to reduce GHG emissions and improve local air quality (e.g., reduce local car tabs for electric vehicles and develop electrical charging stations around the City). - Establish a reduced idling policy for all government vehicles - Incentivize carpooling and trip reduction - Identify municipal operations that could be accomplished without a vehicle or with a less carbon-intense fuel source (e.g., e-scooter or take transit for meter readers) 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations Cap M 3 1 4 2.7 Moving towards a hybirdized and EV vehicle fleet, being a leader in EV charging stations installation, and being imndful of more efficient trasnportation practices will have a measurable impact on overall emmissions. 4 2 4 3.3 Moving towards a hybirdized and EV vehicle fleet and being imndful of more efficient trasnportation practices will have a measurable impact on overall cost 3 2 2.5 Requires Leadership support and Council Action for priotization 4 4 4.0 Access to EV infrastructure and a reduction of fuel costs for the City's vehicle fleets are a big win for tax payers. 5 5 5.0 Public, Municipal EV charging stations supports equity 4 2 3 3.0 transition to EV and hybrid transportation shares benefits with green purchasing, transit support, PRTPO support. 2.67 3.33 2.50 4.00 5.00 3.00 3.4 Y 33 Ecosystem Health Restore and protect natural habitat Harmful algal bloom monitoring Work with Port Angeles Harbor Clean-up partners, as well as NOAA, to increase funding to monitor harmful algal blooms in the Port Angeles harbor. 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations Cap 4 1 3 2.7 Action addresses low mitigation need as water is a relatively low priority for the City. Action addresses an average need and is likely to address goals as it is a capital project. 5 3 4 4.0 Will likely cost the community little to nothing but will require city funding (didn't score lower because partnerships decrease costs for the city). The cost of inaction is high for marine species - if algae blooms are not monitored, aquatic species will be at greater risk which will in turn harm economies dependent on fish etc. 4 5 4.5 City will be funder of implementing entity. No constraints were mentioned by staff/council. 5 3 4.0 Neither support nor opposition from CAPG/PC members Support from community to cleanup algal blooms in community workshop. 3 3 3.0 Action doesn't particularly benefit or harm underserved communities 2 2 2 2.0 Will benefit the public as monitoring algae blooms will likely inform lake/beach closures and keep the public safe. Minimal algae monitoring jobs may be created. The benefit to natural systems is likely minimal as it algae blooms are only monitored, not acted on in this action. 2.67 4.00 4.50 4.00 3.00 2.00 3.3 N Ecosystem Health Increase carbon sequestration potential Extension of timber harvest rotation Work with the County to encourage timber companies to extend timber harvest rotation times, as longer aged trees will sequester more carbon. 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations SPP 1 5 3 3.0 More carbon sequestration from local forests can result in larger scale change. Unlikely to achieve goals as depends on voluntary actions that would cost lumber companies revenue. Outreach to address climate risks and mitigation. 4 5 1 3.3 The cost is very low, failing to implment may not resutl in additional cost/damages to the community. 3 3 3.0 Moderate challenges in asking for profits to be reduced. 3 3 3.0 Likely that some residents and stakeholders will have concerns over economic impacts of longer rotations 3 3 3.0 Neutral 4 1 3 2.7 Benefits to public health, very little impact on green jobs, supports healthy natural systems. 3.00 3.33 3.00 3.00 3.00 2.67 3.0 N Transportation Increase transportation resiliency Transportation vulnerability Expand the WSDOT climate vulnerability assessment to include non-state roads and other transportation systems to ensure that transportation investments are resilient to future climate impacts. Kenmore Climate Action Plan - draft SPP M 2 1 4 2.3 Vulnerable infrastructure/roads are important to resilience of Port Angeles community. 3 3 5 3.7 Greatest cost is inaction if roads fail and isolate the City. 3 4 3.5 Unlikely to be challenged and challenges likely to be overcome. 5 4 4.5 Community understand need for resilient transportation corridors/acces s 4 3 3.5 Addresses needs of a vulnerable community: single road in/out of western PA that flooded during recent atmospheric rivers. 5 2 3 3.3 Public health is assured with functional access/roads out of town. Natural systems may have improved function where impeded by unsustainable roads. 2.33 3.67 3.50 4.50 3.50 3.33 3.3 Y 38 Buildings & Energy Mitigate energy-related GHG emissions Energy efficiency retrofits Incentivize redevelopments to include energy efficient retrofits, such as weatherization and energy efficient appliances, while avoiding the split incentive. Prioritize based on conservation potential and ability to alleviate financial stress for those who are energy-burdened. 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations Reg B 3 2 3 2.7 Action is voluntary but directly reduces emissions via financial incentives. Action is in the energy sector which is a relatively low mitigation need since PA energy grid has a low emissions profile. Action addresses energy grid resilience which is an average adaptation need. 2 3 2 2.3 New energy appliances will likely result in significant costs to some of the community even with incentives. Cost to city is likely minimal as there are no infrastructure plans, just incentives. Because the PA energy grid is already pretty clean, cost of inaction is low. Cost of inaction is likely moderate to some of the communit; increased energy cost without energy efficient appliances. 4 5 4.5 City would be the primary funder/resourc e provider, but may or may not fund the incentives and based on city council/staff feedback, there doesn't seem to be significant constraints. 3 3 3.0 There were no comments from PC/CAPG so I went with a 3. 4 4 4.0 Priotirizing the most energy burdened will reduce their vulnerability; these retrofits will mostly benefit those who are energy burdened, and some who are not. 3 2 2 2.3 Will likely benefit the public health of those most energy burdened by bettering air quality, however will likely result in minimal green jobs and natural system support. 2.67 2.33 4.50 3.00 4.00 2.33 3.1 Y 39 Ecosystem Health Restore and protect natural habitat Wildlife corridors Enhance, restore, and protect wildlife corridors to help wildlife adapt to climate impacts. Potential corridors include: - Six creek valleys - Marine bluff - Areas within west-side forests 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations 3 1 3 2.3 Addresses major need for wildlife community but not entire community. 3 3 2 2.7 Moderate costs to apply, less cost for inaction. 5 4 4.5 Unlikely to encounter challenges that could not be overcome. 4 4 4.0 4 3 3.5 Wiildlife corridors in west-side forests could reduce vulnerability in western PA lower-income communities 1 3 3 2.3 Greatest benefit to natural systems and green engineering/ec onomy. 2.33 2.67 4.50 4.00 3.50 2.33 3.1 N Appendix I Buildings & Energy Mitigate energy-related GHG emissions Energy efficient home heating sources Incentivize homeowners to switch heating sources from wood-burning stoves and propane to high-efficiency electrical heaters and other less carbon intensive sources. Leverage existing BPA program and state and federal funding sources. 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations Vol C 3 2 3 2.7 Voluntary financial incentives are moderately likely to address goals. Mitigation is low as the energy is a low emissions source. Adaptation is moderate as it addresses an average need 2 4 1 2.3 Energy efficient heaters/stoves will likely post a significant cost to some of the community even with incentives. Incentives are minimal costs to the city, especially if federal funding is leveraged. Because the PA energy grid is already pretty clean, cost of inaction is low. 5 4 4.5 City would be implementer and regulator of incentives. No comments from council, and city staff did not identify constraints. Leveraging state funding may be a barrier. 3 3 3.0 No comments from PC/CAPG so rated a 3 - some like stoves and may not want to switch; affects wood stove providers/main tainers who may not support as much 4 5 4.5 Action doesn't particularly benefit overburdened communities - benefits are distributed equally (not equitably) Distributes benefit everyone, particularly those who cannot afford electric appliances. Reduces vulnerabiliy to those who have not yet replaced electric appliances. 4 1 2 2.3 Benefits some of the population (those with propane/wood burning stoves for a significant amount of time. Doesn't necessarily spur any green jobs and indirectly supports healthy natural systems by bettering air quality. 2.67 2.33 4.50 3.00 4.50 2.33 3.2 Y 40 Buildings & Energy Mitigate energy-related GHG emissions BPA renewal agreement Review and renegotiate Bonneville power franchise agreement and ensure renewable, resilient, and low-GHG emission sources that protects healthy habitat for salmon and other aquatic species. Include the option to purchase green energy from the grid and other power providers. 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations SPP C 4 2 1 2.3 Action is in the energy sector which is a relatively low mitigation need since PA energy grid has a low emissions profile. Scored 1 for adaptation need since action is soley an emissions reduction action, but is likely to address goals. 1 2 3 2.0 Cost will likely be minimal to none to the community, will cost the city a bit to renegotiate, and will result in moderate cost damages if not acted upon. 3 3 3.0 City will be official partner in the renegotiation (?) and there may be some challenges ensuring affordable energy for the community. 3 3 3.0 Neither strongly supported/opp osed by PC/CAPG members 5 3 4.0 Reduced energy costs will benefit everyone but not one community more than the other. 3 3 4 3.3 Will moderately benefit public health and spur support green energy infrastrucutre, and will significantly benefit aquatic species. 2.33 2.00 3.00 3.00 4.00 3.33 2.9 Y 41 Buildings & Energy Mitigate energy-related GHG emissions EV parking requirements Mandate that all multifamily housing and other types of housing have EV parking capacity. Include incentives in the code to support bicycle storage (i.e., racks) and ride share amenities. November 2021 CAPG Meeting Reg C 5 5 1 3.7 Action will directly and significantly reduce emissions and is addressing a major mitigation need (land use) but since it is a emissions reduction action it is scored 1 for adaptation 2 3 3 2.7 Will likely impose significant costs to the community and moderate costs to the City by providing incentives, and the cost of inaction is moderate. 5 2 3.5 City will be the lead and will likely face some political opposition as it is mandated (constraints identified by Council/staff). 2 2 2.0 Some opposition from CAPG/PC members 5 4 4.5 Doesn't affect vulnerability or fairness but costs will likely be felt hardest by those already experiencing vulnerabilities. Will benefit those who live in MFD the most so they can easily access EVs and bike infrastructure. Reduces barrier of access to EV infrastructure. 5 3 2 3.3 May benefit public health but benefits are not clear, will significantly support green economy, and will indirectly benefit natural systems from reduced emissions. Will significantly reduce transportaion emissions and thus benefit public health. Will indirectly benefit natural system and will moderately support green jobs but not f l 3.67 2.67 3.50 2.00 4.50 3.33 3.4 Y 42 Buildings & Energy Increase resiliency of energy systems Community renewable energy grid Invest in capital projects that develop community energy projects (e.g., local microgrids, local solar project) to ensure there is energy supply redundancy, especially with the City or neighborhoods lose power. Consider partnerships with Clallam PUD and low- or zero-rate homeowner credit. 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations Cap B 5 2 4 3.7 This capital project/infrastructure have a high likelihood of reducing emissions. Action is in the energy sector which is a relatively low mitigation need since PA energy grid has a low emissions profile. Action addresses energy grid resilience which is an average adaptation need and weatherization/home heating which is a higher adaptation need. 4 1 3 2.7 High cost to city as it's a capital infrastructure project, minimal cost to the community. Cost of inaction is moderate; while investing in these projects will likely decrease frequency of future blackouts, there are other ways to do so (i.e., residential and commercial energy conservation strategies) 5 2 3.5 City will be primary funder and implementer in partnership with other entities. Council says community buyin for solar is a constraint, plus it would be expensive to implement. Technological constraints to microgrid technology. 3 3 3.0 Mixed support from PA / CAPG members 5 5 5.0 Will reduce vulnerability for all, and particularly those who are most affected by black/brownou ts, most likely low-income, elderly, and BIPOC individuals. 5 4 2 3.7 Making the energy grid more resiliet benefit the public health of significant portions of the population for years to come, especially as energy demands increase. Investing in renewable energy projects will indirectly benefit natural systems by moving to cleaner energy sources. Many green jobs will likely become available through these 3.67 2.67 3.50 3.00 5.00 3.67 3.6 Y 45 Buildings & Energy Reduce vulnerability Climate-smart finance policies Disincentivize building in high-risk areas, add filing to property record, and financially prepare for development that may still continue in high-risk areas such as stream ravines and marine bluffs (e.g., require long-term bonds) 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations Reg C 4 1 5 3.3 Regulatory action that will directly enhance resilience, is purely resilience so 1 for mitigation but 5 for adaptation as land use is a major adaptation need. 3 2 4 3.0 Will likely result in moderate costs across the community, will inpose high costs to the City and cost of inaction is high particularly for thos eliving in high risk areas. 5 2 3.5 City is implementer but is likely to encounter challenges given Council feedback that development shouldn't be allowed in high risk areas in the first place. 4 3 3.5 Opposition from CAPG/PC member Strong support from workshop members to prohibit development in critical areas. Unsure how much stakeholders/p artners would support - assume there will be those who support and those who oppose 4 3 3.5 Reduces vulnerability for those in hazard areas and benefits aren't distributed in a way that perpetuates historic inequities. 4 1 4 3.0 Disincentivizin g development in hazard areas will likely benefit natural ecosystems. No or minimal investment in a green economy, but will benefit the health of those already living in hazard areas and those who might develop in the future. Some natural systems will significantly benefit from disincentives but not a 5 since its incentive based. 3.33 3.00 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.00 3.3 Y 46 Buildings & Energy Reduce vulnerability Retrofit buildings for vulnerability Disincentivize development and remove existing infrastructure in the coastal nearshore (i.e., managed retreat). If not possible, retrofit infrastructure for coastal flooding and sea level rise. Consider hard shoreline protection in certain areas, such as bluff crests where infrastructure needs to be realigned and protected. This action would be informed by the SLR vulnerability assessment. 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations Cap C 4 1 5 3.3 Action will significantly enhance resilience. Because action is purley resilience, mitigaton is a 1 but adaptatoin is a 5 as it addresses a major need 2 2 5 3.0 Costs are likely high to those wanting to develop near the coast. Cost to the city is likely large to retrofit existing buildings. Cost of inaction is high. 5 3 4.0 City will be lead, and will likely experience political constraints (some think development should be halted all together and we a proactive approach should be taken, some think a more reactive approach is acceptable) May encounter push back bc development along coastline is highly valuable. 4 4 4.0 Support from CAPG/PC members 4 3 3.5 Reduces vulnerability for those living near the coast, and distribution of benefits doesn't perpetuate historic inequities. 5 3 2 3.3 Will significantly benefit public health (benefit mental health knowing their homes are safer), will support some green jobs. Hard armoring (eg along bluffs) will likely negatively impact coastal ecosystems, but managed retreat may benefit natural systems (e.g., Ediz Hook marsh/eelgrass ). 3.33 3.00 4.00 4.00 3.50 3.33 3.5 Y 47 Consumption and Waste Decrease waste-related GHG emissions Wastewater facility emissions reduction Evaluate wastewater facility to reduce GHG emissions. 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations SPP 1 1 5 2.3 The wastewater treatment plant accounts for a very small amount of emmisions, but it is in a major floodplain and measures should be taken to protect this essential infrastructure from potential rising sea level and seasonal flooding 5 5 5 5.0 protecting our wastewater infrastructure now outweighs the potential cost of doing nothing 5 5 5.0 Low planning - related costs make this action very acheivable with political will. 4 3 3.5 Planning-level action is low cost and allows for the assessment of design alternatives. 3 3 3.0 Treatment plant not located near development; because it's an evaluation, does not affect equity 3 5 3 3.7 addressing treatment plant emissions will lead to addressing Rayonier clean- up, which is a major clean-up need; eval action that requires engineering services is high green econ, but lower for other co- benefits 2.33 5.00 5.00 3.50 3.00 3.67 3.7 Y 48 Appendix I Consumption and Waste Promote sustainable consumption Residential food waste diversion programs Consistent with the County Solid Waste Management Plan, develop food waste diversion program for households such as using greenwaste bins for compost to eliminate landfilling of food waste that cause methane emissions. 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations Vol 2 3 1 2.0 Voluntary program that will directly reduce emissions, but is addressing waste which is an average mitigation need is a minor adaptation need. 4 3 4 3.7 Will likely cost the city nothing to start these programs, but will cost the city a moderate amount. Cost of inaction is high, resulting in increased methane emissions. 5 5 5.0 City will be lead implememter and regulator (I think, however maybe collection agencies would be the lead and the City is more of a 4?). Likley minimal to no constraints; Council and staff were supportive and didn't mention any constraints. 4 4 4.0 Support from CAPG/PC members 3 3 3.0 Doesn't direcrly reduce vulnerability for the community and does not distribute benefits in a way that perpetuates historic inequities. 3 3 2 2.7 Moderately benefits public health, creates some green jobs and indirectly supports natural systems. 2.00 3.67 5.00 4.00 3.00 2.67 3.3 Y 51 Consumption and Waste Promote sustainable consumption Commercial food waste diversion programs Consistent with the County Solid Waste Management Plan, work with the County to develop food waste diversion and composting programs for commercial businesses, such as diverting food waste to donation programs, placing compost bins around the city, and identifying end- use applications for compost, to reduce climate changing gases that are emitted when organics rot in landfills. 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations Vol 2 3 2 2.3 Action is voluntary w/o incentives and directly reduces waste GHG emissions thus is scored a 2. Action addresses the waste sector which is an average mitigation need. Adaptation score is a 2 as it mainly addresses GHG emissions reduction but food donations also benefits vulnerable parts of the community. 4 3 1 2.7 Will likely not cost the community anything but will require some investment from the city to place compost bins around the city and develop programs. Will likely result in minimal cost increases for the community; might not be free but low cost. Cost of inaction is low because waste emissions account for so little of emisssions profile. 5 4 4.5 City will be implementer and regulator and action is unlikely to encounter constraints. 3 4 3.5 Support from CAPG/PC members. Lowered Residential support score to a 4 based on workshop 3 feedback. 4 4 4.0 While this action mainly benefits everyone equally, however food donation programs will particularly benefit those that historically face inequities. 4 4 2 3.3 Food donation programs will persistently benefit the public health of some (food insecure individuals) for 5+ years. New programs and educatoinal opportunities will spur green jobs, and indirectly benefit natural systems by increasing composting opportunities which benefit soils, animals etc. 2.33 2.67 4.50 3.50 4.00 3.33 3.3 Y 52 Consumption and Waste Promote sustainable consumption City and community sustainable purchasing Utilize a "Green Team" model to develop sustainable purchasing policies for the City and community. 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations Vol M 4 5 3 4.0 The impact will depend on the scope of changes to purchasing practices. This could be a simple as digitization of all City Activities to purchase orders like recreation/transportation products 5 3 2 3.3 "green purchasing" has the potential to assist reduction of soft costs related to maintenance of space and access to information in the field. Need to quantify existing waste to encourage transition to green purchasing 5 5 5.0 Changes in purchasing behavior and low risk make this action very feasible 4 3 3.5 Moving to an online paperless system allows for more accessibility to information for community members without a high cost. Green purchasing assists with overall municipal cost savings for and better budget management for maintenance and continuing costs. 3 3 3.0 Promotes better access to information. 3 3 3 3.0 Affects many levels of decision- making related to climate action and adaptation 4.00 3.33 5.00 3.50 3.00 3.00 3.7 Y 53 Appendix I March 1, 2022 | 1 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Dra� Resiliency Plan Ac�ons & Mul�- Criteria Analysis Results Introduction This document presents the Port Angeles Resiliency Plan draft actions list and multi-criteria analysis results. To generate the actions list: 1.Cascadia developed an initial actions list based on the Climate Action Planning Group (CAPG) 2019 Climate Resiliency Recommendations, City documents, and consultant experience. 2.CAPG reviewed, refined, and added to the initial actions list in their Nov. 2021 workshop. 3.The general public provided input, including new action ideas, through a workshop in Nov. 2021. 4. Cascadia reviewed the list of ~120 actions generated through CAPG and public workshops. We grouped similar actions together to improve implementation potential and clarify how the City plans to pursue resiliency to generate the list of 71 draft actions included in this document. To determine which actions would be evaluated through the multi-criteria analysis, CAPG completed a survey to prioritize actions for analysis. Based largely on survey results, but also considering a balance of action types, sectors, and City and community priorities, Cascadia selected 40 actions for multi-criteria analysis. Actions that were not assessed can still be included in the Resiliency Plan. More information on the analysis and results is provided herein. Contents Draft Resiliency Plan Actions & Multi-Criteria Analysis Results ...................................................................... 1 Introduction ................................................................................................................................................. 1 Multi-Criteria Analysis Results ..................................................................................................................... 2 Findings & Recommendations ................................................................................................................. 3 Highest-Priority Actions ........................................................................................................................... 8 Overall Results ....................................................................................................................................... 10 Top Actions by Strategy ......................................................................................................................... 14 Top Actions by Sector ............................................................................................................................ 16 Draft Actions .............................................................................................................................................. 18 Actions not evaluated through the MCA ............................................................................................... 18 Actions evaluated through the MCA ..................................................................................................... 22 Appendix J March 1, 2022 | 2 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Multi-Criteria Analysis Results The Cascadia team and City conducted a qualitative multi-criteria analysis (MCA: a scoring system that which ranks actions against a set of decision criteria) to evaluate 40 of 71 of the Resiliency Plan draft actions. Through a survey, CAPG helped identify which actions to evaluate. CAPG and City representatives from Planning Commission, City Council, and City government vetted the criteria, criteria definitions, and their weights. For each action evaluated, the evaluation team assigned numeric rankings of 1 to 5 based on how well the action aligned with each criterion. We used a weighted summation to arrive at an overall priority score for each action. Our analysis considers top-scoring actions (overall, by strategy, and by sector) and qualitative themes observable from scoring trends. Criterion Weight Interpreting Scores 1 2 3 4 5 Impact: Relative potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 1 AND relative potential to increase adaptive capacity/resilience. 25% Very low impact Low impact Moderate impact High impact Very high impact Cost: Relative costs to the City and community; costs of inaction 20% Very high costs; Very low costs of inaction High costs; Low costs of inaction Moderate costs; Moderate costs of inaction Low costs; High costs of inaction Very low costs; Very high costs of inaction Equity: Relative ability to reduce vulnerability, especially among overburdened communities; whether costs and benefits are distributed equitably; whether historic inequities are addressed 20% High potential to create inequitable outcomes Some potential to create inequitable outcomes Likely to have neutral impact Some potential to generate equitable outcomes High potential to generate equitable outcomes Feasibility: Relative level of City control; relative level of regulatory, political, or technological constraints; adaptability to new technologies; alignment with existing policies, plans, and programs 15% Very low City control; Unviable due to constraints Low City control; Difficult to implement Moderate City control; Moderately difficult to implement High City control; Relatively easy to implement Very high City control; Easy to implement Community support: Relative level of support from residents, stakeholders, and other non-government implementing partners 10% Most strongly oppose Some strongly oppose Mixed/neutral support Some strongly support Most strongly support Co-benefits: Relative potential for an action to lead to additional beneficial outcomes, especially public health, a greener economy (focused on the City’s most promising green sectors), and healthy natural systems (especially salmon, kelp, seagrasses, and their habitats) 10% No to Very Low co-benefits Indirect, short- term, small-scale co-benefits Direct co-benefits, but short- to mid- term and/or moderate scale Significant, direct co-benefits over longer-term and/or larger scale Significant, direct, long- term, large-scale co-benefits 1 Potential to reduce GHG emissions is based on the results of the City’s GHG emissions inventory. Potential to reduce climate risk and build resilience is based on the results of regional climate studies, demographics, and local expert knowledge. Appendix J March 1, 2022 | 3 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Findings & Recommendations We report five key findings from the MCA: 1. Evaluated actions overall scored well, but improvements on specific criteria would strengthen the Resiliency Plan. See Overall Results for a list of all actions organized by their priority score. 2. Transportation and Community Resilience & Wellbeing actions scored significantly higher than other sectors. 3. The highest-priority actions tend to both build resilience and reduce emissions, or address existing high-priority community concerns. See Highest-Priority Actions for a list of these actions. 4. Baseline assessments and climate-smart financing did not score highly overall, but are critical to build resilience. 5. Actions that are significantly outside of the City’s control scored the lowest overall. Lists of the Top Actions by Strategy and Top Actions by Sector are also provided. Finding 1. Evaluated actions overall scored well, but improvements on specific criteria would strengthen the Resiliency Plan. The table below summarizes the themes and recommendations for this finding. Themes Recommendation(s)  Actions selected for evaluation overall scored moderate to high. Relatively few actions scored below a 3.  This suggests the selected actions are balanced in terms of benefits and tradeoffs.  Use higher scoring actions as guidance to evaluate and improve actions that were not evaluated.  Impact scored low to moderate in about half of actions evaluated: o Sixty-three percent (63%) of actions have impact scores below 3.0. Of these 25 actions, seven are in the Buildings & Energy and Consumption & Waste sectors, which are low-emissions sectors in Port Angeles. Ten actions are either foundational baseline assessments (see Finding 4) or Ecosystem Health actions that are necessary and likely  The lower impact scores reflect a focus in the actions list on baseline assessments, thoroughness in linking the Resiliency Plan to broader ecosystem health and community concerns,2 and having high-impact approaches lumped into fewer actions.3  City Councilmembers asked for information on whether the Resiliency Plan, in its entirety, is likely to result in reaching carbon neutrality by 2030. Cascadia is able to provide a qualitative response, based on our experience with quantitative assessments for other jurisdictions. 2 This trend is most common for Ecosystem Health actions that have a less direct link to community resilience or emissions reduction (e.g., wildlife corridors, critical area protection). These actions tend to score well across all other criteria due to their strong co-benefits, popularity, and feasibility. 3 Having high-impact approaches lumped into fewer actions is an artifact of the action development process. Unless there is a reason to split up actions to improve implementation potential, there is no issue (from a technical perspective). Appendix J March 1, 2022 | 4 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Themes Recommendation(s) to continue under other programs. Three actions have high scores in other criteria and are among the highest- priority actions identified through the MCA.  Overall, the Resiliency Plan actions are focusing on the key actions Port Angeles will need to take to build resilience and achieve carbon neutrality by 2030. However, actions may need to be implemented faster or at a broader scale, and there are gaps to fill. It will also be important to move beyond both infrastructure risk analysis and vulnerability assessments into action, and to have a plan to do so quickly. o Implement faster / more broadly: Actions that focus on transportation infrastructure, equity, and safety, including electrification of transit vehicles will need to be implemented quickly and comprehensively to achieve carbon neutrality by 2030. Also, energy supply should be 100% carbon-free by 2030. o Fill key gaps: Recognizing the transportation focus in Port Angeles is transit, non-motorized travel, and small e-mobility, these actions should be paired with programs to aggressively and quickly reduce barriers to and incentivize new or used zero-emissions vehicle (ZEV) ownership for those who need to drive. Actions focused on the circular economy (including waste diversion) and supply chain resiliency also need greater detail and integration to both reduce consumption-based emissions and build a more local, resilient supply chain. To improve the circular economy actions, we recommend a follow-on project to focus on these needs. o Plan for infrastructure design & construction now: The major infrastructure improvements that Port Angeles will likely need are going to take many years to design and build. To reduce City and community risk and cost, begin planning and trying to secure funding now for infrastructure design and construction.  Equity scored low to moderate in about half of actions evaluated: o Forty percent (40%) of actions have equity scores of 2.5 or 3.0.  Since “3.0” is a neutral score, these actions should be evaluated for ways to reduce climate-related risks and build resiliency within overburdened communities.  Support for healthy natural systems scored low to moderate in about half of actions evaluated: o While co-benefits overall were scored at least moderately, 55% of actions have scores below 3.0 for “support for healthy natural systems.” This sub-criterion  Actions that will occur near salmon, kelp, and seagrass habitat or otherwise affect these species should be re-evaluated to improve performance on this sub-criterion. Appendix J March 1, 2022 | 5 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Themes Recommendation(s) is focused on salmon, kelp, seagrasses, and their habitats.  Many actions lacked sufficient detail to confidently assess community cost and/or community support.  Closely review these criteria scores to identify and correct major discrepancies in assessing community cost and/or community support. Finding 2. Transportation and Community Resilience & Wellbeing actions scored significantly higher than other sectors. The table below summarizes the themes and recommendations for this finding. Themes Recommendation(s)  Ninety percent (90%) of Transportation actions are in the top 20 scores. Sixty-seven percent (67%) of Community Resilience & Wellbeing actions are in the top 20 scores. These trends are aligned with stated community priorities.  About one-third of actions in Ecosystem Health and Buildings & Energy are in the top 20 scores. The distinction is likely due to the higher-scoring actions having both resilience building and emissions reducing benefits (see Finding 3). In general, due to the low emissions from Port Angeles’s energy sources, Buildings & Energy actions are overall lower impact and therefore tend to score lower overall.  Fifty percent (50%) of Consumption & Waste actions are in the top 20 scores. The higher-scoring actions either have a significantly larger scope than the other actions in the sector (City and community sustainable purchasing) or have an above-average co-benefits score for the type of action (wastewater facility GHG study).  None. This is an observational finding. Finding 3. The highest-priority actions tend to both build resilience and reduce emissions, or address existing high-priority community concerns. The table below summarizes the themes and recommendations for this finding. Appendix J March 1, 2022 | 6 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Themes Recommendation(s)  Actions that ranked highly overall, within their strategy, and within their sector both build resilience and reduce emissions. These are: o Forest and marine habitat preservation o Urban tree canopy, parks, and open space o Community renewable energy grid  Prioritize these actions for implementation.  Actions that ranked highly overall, within their strategy, and within their sector address existing high-priority community concerns. These are: o Housing Action Plan implementation o Climate migration policy o Climate resilience & emergency planning o Transit infrastructure, equity, & safety  Prioritize these actions for implementation. Finding 4. Baseline assessments and climate-smart financing did not score highly overall, but are critical to build resilience. The table below summarizes the themes and recommendations for this finding. Themes Recommendation(s)  As is common, baseline assessments, evaluations, and some policy changes scored lower than more directly impactful actions.  These actions are fundamental for resilience building and should continue to be prioritized. In particular: o SLR vulnerability assessment o Hazard Mitigation Plan implementation o Shoreline Master Program updates o Critical area protection o Transportation vulnerability  “Climate-smart finance policies” scored moderately, yet building resilience will require dedicated and smart investment.  The City should still devote time and resources to permanently funding the Resiliency Plan. Finding 5. Actions that are significantly outside of the City’s control scored the lowest overall. The table below summarizes the themes and recommendations for this finding. Appendix J March 1, 2022 | 7 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Themes Recommendation(s)  Of the five actions with the lowest scores, three are significantly outside of the City’s control. They are: o Extension of timber harvest rotation o BPA renewal agreement o Flood vulnerability and risk (i.e., FEMA flood map updates)  Consider refocusing “extension of timber harvest rotation” on small-holder climate-friendly forestry, which was identified as a promising green economy sector for Port Angeles.  Consider deprioritizing the remaining two actions, at least for early implementation. BPA’s power grid will get cleaner over time due to state law; in the meantime, the high-scoring “community renewable energy grid” can generate both the greener energy and grid resilience the community seeks. Regarding updating FEMA flood maps, there may be other options to acquire the data needed from more available partners.  Review the unevaluated actions to identify those that are significantly outside of the City’s control and consider deprioritizing them, unless other factors (e.g., high impact, high equity benefit) outweigh the City’s lack of control. Appendix J March 1, 2022 | 8 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Highest-Priority Actions The Cascadia team considered actions with a compiled score of 3.6 or greater, the 2-3 top actions in each sector, and the 1-2 top actions in each strategy. Actions in two or more of these categories were identified as the highest-priority actions to pursue of those evaluated with the MCA. Unevaluated actions with similar characteristics to the highest-priority actions should also be considered for prioritization. Sector Color Coding: Community Resilience & Wellbeing | Ecosystem Health | Transportation | Buildings & Energy | Consumption & Waste Strategy Action # Action Short Name Impact Cost Feasibility Community Support Equity Co- Benefits Priority Score Rationale Increase community adaptive capacity 116 Housing Action Plan implementation 3.33 3.67 4.00 4.50 5.00 3.67 4.0 >3.6 Sector Strategy Increase community adaptive capacity 36 Climate migration policy 3.67 4.67 3.50 3.00 4.00 3.33 3.8 >3.6 Sector Strategy Prepare for extreme events 86 Climate resilience & emergency planning 2.33 4.67 4.50 4.00 4.00 3.33 3.7 >3.6 Sector Strategy Increase opportunities for carbon sequestration and storage 114 Forest and marine habitat preservation 5.00 3.33 2.50 4.50 4.00 4.00 3.9 >3.6 Sector Strategy Restore and protect natural habitat 9 Urban tree canopy, parks, and open space 2.33 3.67 5.00 4.00 3.50 4.00 3.6 >3.6 Sector Strategy Restore and protect natural habitat 37 Coastal erosion reduction 3.33 3.33 4.50 3.00 3.00 3.33 3.4 Sector Strategy Decrease transportation GHG emissions 1 Transit infrastructure, equity, & safety 3.67 3.00 3.50 3.00 5.00 3.33 3.7 >3.6 Sector Strategy Decrease transportation GHG emissions 30 Increase EV use for general public 3.67 4.33 4.50 3.00 3.00 2.33 3.6 >3.6 Sector Appendix J March 1, 2022 | 9 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Strategy Action # Action Short Name Impact Cost Feasibility Community Support Equity Co- Benefits Priority Score Rationale Increase resiliency of energy systems 2 Community renewable energy grid 3.67 2.67 3.50 3.00 5.00 3.67 3.6 >3.6 Sector Strategy Reduce vulnerability 64 Retrofit buildings for vulnerability 3.33 3.00 4.00 4.00 3.50 3.33 3.5 Sector Strategy Mitigate energy- related GHG emissions 83 EV parking requirements 3.67 2.67 3.50 2.00 4.50 3.33 3.4 Sector Strategy Promote sustainable consumption 7 City and community sustainable purchasing 4.00 3.33 5.00 3.50 3.00 3.00 3.7 >3.6 Sector Strategy Decrease waste- related GHG emissions 19 Wastewater facility GHG 2.33 5.00 5.00 3.50 3.00 3.67 3.7 >3.6 Sector Strategy Appendix J March 1, 2022 | 10 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Overall Results Actions are listed from the highest priority score to the lowest priority score. Where scores are the same, the order of actions is random and does not indicate a priority order. Sector Color Coding: Community Resilience & Wellbeing | Ecosystem Health | Transportation | Buildings & Energy | Consumption & Waste Strategy Action # Action Short Name Impact Cost Feasibility Community Support Equity Co- Benefits Priority Score Increase community adaptive capacity 116 Housing Action Plan implementation 3.33 3.67 4.00 4.50 5.00 3.67 4.0 Increase opportunities for carbon sequestration and storage 114 Forest and marine habitat preservation 5.00 3.33 2.50 4.50 4.00 4.00 3.9 Increase community adaptive capacity 36 Climate migration policy 3.67 4.67 3.50 3.00 4.00 3.33 3.8 Prepare for extreme events 86 Climate resilience & emergency planning 2.33 4.67 4.50 4.00 4.00 3.33 3.7 Promote sustainable consumption 7 City and community sustainable purchasing 4.00 3.33 5.00 3.50 3.00 3.00 3.7 Decrease waste- related GHG emissions 19 Wastewater facility GHG 2.33 5.00 5.00 3.50 3.00 3.67 3.7 Decrease transportation GHG emissions 1 Transit infrastructure, equity, & safety 3.67 3.00 3.50 3.00 5.00 3.33 3.7 Increase resiliency of energy systems 2 Community renewable energy grid 3.67 2.67 3.50 3.00 5.00 3.67 3.6 Increase community adaptive capacity 119 Comprehensive climate outreach & education 2.00 4.33 4.00 3.00 5.00 3.33 3.6 Restore and protect natural habitat 9 Urban tree canopy, parks, and open space 2.33 3.67 5.00 4.00 3.50 4.00 3.6 Appendix J March 1, 2022 | 11 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Strategy Action # Action Short Name Impact Cost Feasibility Community Support Equity Co- Benefits Priority Score Decrease transportation GHG emissions 30 Increase EV use for general public 3.67 4.33 4.50 3.00 3.00 2.33 3.6 Reduce vulnerability 64 Retrofit buildings for vulnerability 3.33 3.00 4.00 4.00 3.50 3.33 3.5 Increase community adaptive capacity 17 SLR vulnerability assessment 2.67 4.33 4.50 4.00 3.00 3.33 3.5 Increase community adaptive capacity 59 Water supply monitoring & enhancement 2.67 3.33 3.50 4.00 4.50 3.33 3.5 Mitigate energy- related GHG emissions 83 EV parking requirements 3.67 2.67 3.50 2.00 4.50 3.33 3.4 Increase community adaptive capacity 13 Sustainable agriculture 3.00 2.67 4.00 5.00 3.50 3.33 3.4 Prepare for extreme events 14 Wildfire urban interface 2.67 3.67 5.00 3.00 3.50 2.67 3.4 Restore and protect natural habitat 37 Coastal erosion reduction 3.33 3.33 4.50 3.00 3.00 3.33 3.4 Decrease transportation GHG emissions 31 Biking and walking infrastructure 3.33 2.67 4.00 5.00 3.00 3.00 3.4 Decrease transportation GHG emissions 32 Municipal fleet electrification & idle reduction 2.67 3.33 2.50 4.00 5.00 3.00 3.4 Reduce vulnerability 48 Climate-smart finance policies 3.33 3.00 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.00 3.3 Increase community adaptive capacity 115 Hazard Mitigation Plan implementation 2.00 3.33 3.50 4.00 4.00 4.00 3.3 Increase community adaptive capacity 45 City asset vulnerability 2.00 4.00 4.50 4.00 3.50 2.33 3.3 Appendix J March 1, 2022 | 12 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Strategy Action # Action Short Name Impact Cost Feasibility Community Support Equity Co- Benefits Priority Score Promote sustainable consumption 20 Commercial food waste diversion programs 2.33 2.67 4.50 4.00 4.00 3.33 3.3 Promote sustainable consumption 21 Residential food waste diversion programs 2.00 3.67 5.00 4.00 3.00 2.67 3.3 Restore and protect natural habitat 24 Shoreline Master Program updates 2.33 4.33 3.50 4.00 3.00 3.00 3.3 Restore and protect natural habitat 26 Harmful algal bloom monitoring 2.67 4.00 4.50 4.00 3.00 2.00 3.3 Increase transportation resiliency 35 Transportation vulnerability 2.33 3.67 3.50 4.50 3.50 3.33 3.3 Mitigate energy- related GHG emissions 4 Energy efficient home heating sources 2.67 2.33 4.50 3.00 4.50 2.33 3.2 Restore and protect natural habitat 25 Critical area protection 2.33 4.00 3.50 4.00 3.00 3.00 3.2 Mitigate energy- related GHG emissions 3 Energy efficiency retrofits 2.67 2.33 4.50 3.00 4.00 2.33 3.1 Mitigate energy- related GHG emissions 10 Net metering monitoring 2.33 3.33 4.50 4.00 3.00 2.00 3.1 Restore and protect natural habitat 51 Wildlife corridors 2.33 2.67 4.50 4.00 3.50 2.33 3.1 Mitigate energy- related GHG emissions 11 Green Building standards 2.67 3.00 4.00 2.00 3.00 3.67 3.0 Restore and protect natural habitat 27 Salmon habitat protection 2.33 3.33 3.00 4.00 3.00 2.67 3.0 Increase carbon sequestration potential 28 Extension of timber harvest rotation 3.00 3.33 3.00 3.00 3.00 2.67 3.0 Appendix J March 1, 2022 | 13 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Strategy Action # Action Short Name Impact Cost Feasibility Community Support Equity Co- Benefits Priority Score Mitigate energy- related GHG emissions 5 BPA renewal agreement 2.33 2.00 3.00 3.00 4.00 3.33 2.9 Prepare for extreme events 47 Flood vulnerability and risk 2.00 4.33 2.50 4.00 3.50 1.00 2.9 Increase community adaptive capacity 8 City price on carbon 3.33 2.67 3.50 2.00 2.00 3.00 2.8 Restore and protect natural habitat 49 Native plant landscaping 1.67 2.33 4.50 3.00 3.00 2.67 2.7 Appendix J March 1, 2022 | 14 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Top Actions by Strategy The top 1-2 actions in each strategy are shown below. Buildings & Energy includes three strategies; all other sectors include two strategies. One action per strategy is typically included. However, for Community Resilience & Wellbeing and Ecosystem Health (12 and 10 actions, respectively), we chose the top action from each strategy and the third-highest scoring action from either strategy. Sector Color Coding: Community Resilience & Wellbeing | Ecosystem Health | Transportation | Buildings & Energy | Consumption & Waste Strategy Action # Action Short Name Impact Cost Feasibility Community Support Equity Co- Benefits Priority Score Increase community adaptive capacity 116 Housing Action Plan implementation 3.33 3.67 4.00 4.50 5.00 3.67 4.0 Increase community adaptive capacity 36 Climate migration policy 3.67 4.67 3.50 3.00 4.00 3.33 3.8 Prepare for extreme events 86 Climate resilience & emergency planning 2.33 4.67 4.50 4.00 4.00 3.33 3.7 Increase opportunities for carbon sequestration and storage 114 Forest and marine habitat preservation 5.00 3.33 2.50 4.50 4.00 4.00 3.9 Restore and protect natural habitat 9 Urban tree canopy, parks, and open space 2.33 3.67 5.00 4.00 3.50 4.00 3.6 Restore and protect natural habitat 37 Coastal erosion reduction 3.33 3.33 4.50 3.00 3.00 3.33 3.4 Decrease transportation GHG emissions 1 Transit infrastructure, equity, & safety 3.67 3.00 3.50 3.00 5.00 3.33 3.7 Increase transportation resiliency 35 Transportation vulnerability 2.33 3.67 3.50 4.50 3.50 3.33 3.3 Increase resiliency of energy systems 2 Community renewable energy grid 3.67 2.67 3.50 3.00 5.00 3.67 3.6 Reduce vulnerability 64 Retrofit buildings for vulnerability 3.33 3.00 4.00 4.00 3.50 3.33 3.5 Appendix J March 1, 2022 | 15 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Strategy Action # Action Short Name Impact Cost Feasibility Community Support Equity Co- Benefits Priority Score Mitigate energy- related GHG emissions 83 EV parking requirements 3.67 2.67 3.50 2.00 4.50 3.33 3.4 Promote sustainable consumption 7 City and community sustainable purchasing 4.00 3.33 5.00 3.50 3.00 3.00 3.7 Decrease waste- related GHG emissions 19 Wastewater facility GHG 2.33 5.00 5.00 3.50 3.00 3.67 3.7 Appendix J March 1, 2022 | 16 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Top Actions by Sector The top 2-3 actions in each sector are shown below. Since we evaluated five or fewer actions each in the Transportation and Consumption & Waste sectors, the top 2 actions are shown below. All other sectors include the top 3 actions. Sector Color Coding: Community Resilience & Wellbeing | Ecosystem Health | Transportation | Buildings & Energy | Consumption & Waste Strategy Action # Action Short Name Impact Cost Feasibility Community Support Equity Co- Benefits Priority Score Increase community adaptive capacity 116 Housing Action Plan implementation 3.33 3.67 4.00 4.50 5.00 3.67 4.0 Increase community adaptive capacity 36 Climate migration policy 3.67 4.67 3.50 3.00 4.00 3.33 3.8 Prepare for extreme events 86 Climate resilience & emergency planning 2.33 4.67 4.50 4.00 4.00 3.33 3.7 Increase opportunities for carbon sequestration and storage 114 Forest and marine habitat preservation 5.00 3.33 2.50 4.50 4.00 4.00 3.9 Restore and protect natural habitat 9 Urban tree canopy, parks, and open space 2.33 3.67 5.00 4.00 3.50 4.00 3.6 Restore and protect natural habitat 37 Coastal erosion reduction 3.33 3.33 4.50 3.00 3.00 3.33 3.4 Decrease transportation GHG emissions 1 Transit infrastructure, equity, & safety 3.67 3.00 3.50 3.00 5.00 3.33 3.7 Decrease transportation GHG emissions 30 Increase EV use for general public 3.67 4.33 4.50 3.00 3.00 2.33 3.6 Increase resiliency of energy systems 2 Community renewable energy grid 3.67 2.67 3.50 3.00 5.00 3.67 3.6 Reduce vulnerability 64 Retrofit buildings for vulnerability 3.33 3.00 4.00 4.00 3.50 3.33 3.5 Appendix J March 1, 2022 | 17 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Strategy Action # Action Short Name Impact Cost Feasibility Community Support Equity Co- Benefits Priority Score Mitigate energy- related GHG emissions 83 EV parking requirements 3.67 2.67 3.50 2.00 4.50 3.33 3.4 Promote sustainable consumption 7 City and community sustainable purchasing 4.00 3.33 5.00 3.50 3.00 3.00 3.7 Decrease waste- related GHG emissions 19 Wastewater facility GHG 2.33 5.00 5.00 3.50 3.00 3.67 3.7 Appendix J March 1, 2022 | 18 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Draft Actions This section presents actions in two sub-sections:  Actions that were not evaluated through the MCA  Actions evaluated through the multi-criteria analysis (MCA) – these are copied here and organized by sector to reduce the need to scroll during discussion. They results are the same as those reported in Multi-Criteria Analysis Results. Actions not evaluated through the MCA Yellow highlights indicate an action that CAPG endorses for inclusion. Sector Color Coding: Community Resilience & Wellbeing | Ecosystem Health | Transportation | Buildings & Energy | Consumption & Waste Strategy Action # Action Short Name Include in Plan? Why Excluded from MCA? Implications of MCA Results Increase community adaptive capacity 121 Water regulations Focus on groundwater and aquifer recharge, water efficiency, water storage and reclaim, and stormwater retention. Likely to score moderate to high as regulatory/infrastructure action (higher impact) that addresses moderate resilience need, equity & co-benefits benefits Increase community adaptive capacity 62 Community Rating System Yes – can save PA money too. And Vuln reduction elements City to participate in FEMA’s CRS. Likely to score low-moderate due to lower impact and moderate on other criteria Increase community adaptive capacity 122 Local groundwater strategy No Was likely to be a lower priority assessment action than other assessments (e.g., SLR vulnerability) Likely to score low-moderate due to lower impact with moderate other benefits and low costs. May be needed for “water regulations” action to be more effective. Increase community adaptive capacity 120 Community- based accountability Yes – but maybe lump into education part of Implementation of this should be led by others, not City. As outreach action, likely to perform similar to “comprehensive climate education and outreach.” Appendix J March 1, 2022 | 19 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Strategy Action # Action Short Name Include in Plan? Why Excluded from MCA? Implications of MCA Results other ECO actions. Increase community adaptive capacity 84 Comprehensive Plan priorities Climate Resiliency Plan already going to be part of Comprehensive Plan. Intending to meet requirement of HB 1099 already. Likely to score low-moderate due to lower impact (policy action), moderate other benefits, and low costs Increase community adaptive capacity 85 County-City coordination Yes Need to be specific which actions need cross-jurisdictional coordination. Likely to score moderate due to lower impact, moderate-high other benefits, and low costs. Increase community adaptive capacity 87 City volunteer coordinator Desire to hire an actual staff member to hire volunteers, not just a volunteer to coordinate volunteers. Likely to score low-moderate due to lower impact, moderate other benefits, and higher City costs. Prepare for extreme events 88 Climate resiliency hubs Synergies with hazard mitigation and emergency preparedness. Likely to score high due to high impact and other benefits, and low costs. Increase community adaptive capacity 89 Housing access and coordination Already a known City and community priority. Likely to score moderate. Needs to link to Housing Action Plan implementation more strongly. Restore and protect natural habitat 50 Submerged habitat monitoring Would need to work with DNR and County to implement. Likely to perform similarly to similar Ecosystem Health actions in the bottom 20 of MCA results (e.g., wildlife corridors). Restore and protect natural habitat 53 Climate sensitive tree species USGS and USFS leading. Likely to perform similarly to similar Ecosystem Health actions in the bottom 20 of MCA results (e.g., wildlife corridors). Would it make sense to include the riparian areas called out in this action be included in the “Urban tree canopy, parks, and open space” action? Restore and protect natural habitat 54 Culvert replacement State/Federal responsibility. Likely to perform similarly to similar Ecosystem Health actions in the bottom 20 of MCA results (e.g., critical area protection). May score a bit higher due to benefits to salmon. Appendix J March 1, 2022 | 20 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Strategy Action # Action Short Name Include in Plan? Why Excluded from MCA? Implications of MCA Results Restore and protect natural habitat 55 Land-based pollutant reduction State/Federal responsibility. Likely to perform similar to “coastal erosion reduction.” Score may be slightly higher due to benefits to marine habitat. Restore and protect natural habitat 117 Capital Facilities Plan implementation Already prioritized by City. Likely to perform similarly to “Hazard Mitigation Plan implementation” Address sea level rise 118 Resilience of clean-up sites Long-term action. Likely to perform similarly or higher than “wastewater facility GHG” study. Address sea level rise 97 CBA of armor repair Will help assess implementation cost of on-the-ground actions. Likely to perform similarly to other coastal baseline assessments. May be slightly higher due to Ediz Hook focus area. Address sea level rise 104 Boat launch repair Trade-off: defend low-lying infrastructure, retrofit it, or move it? Likely to score low-moderate as small-scale infrastructure project that is important to community. Decrease transportation GHG emissions 33 Encourage electrification of regional transport Yes Still consider for inclusion. Will need to be in coordination with Clallam Transit. Likely to score high due to higher impact sector, high equity and other benefits, and lower costs (as partnership action). Necessary to reach carbon neutrality by 2030. GHG emissions 68 Ban on marine fossil fuel infrastructure No Higher priority transportation actions to evaluate. If ban marine fossil fuel, it will be DOA. Likely to score low-moderate due to impactful but costly and unpopular (for some) action. GHG emissions 123 Port electrification Yes New action in response to feedback on “ban marine fossil fuel infrastructure.” Potentially include to focus on incentivizing the electrification of Port’s infrastructure and allow for marine electrification, which is a promising green economy sector for Port Angeles. Likely to score moderate (maybe high) due to being impactful, moderate-high other benefits, but at least moderately costly. GHG emissions 76 City employee commute emissions Yes Shows City leadership in reducing VMT. Likely to score low due to low impact, mixed support among staff, low cost, and lower co- benefits. Appendix J March 1, 2022 | 21 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Strategy Action # Action Short Name Include in Plan? Why Excluded from MCA? Implications of MCA Results Decrease transportation GHG emissions 113 Medium- and heavy-duty vehicle decarbonization Unsure about relevancy to City and City’s oversight of this for pass- through vehicles. Likely to score moderate due to higher impact, moderate feasibility and costs, mixed support, and moderate co-benefits. Mitigate energy-related GHG emissions 12 Green incentive program Need to work with federal partners and BPA to improve incentives. Likely to score low. Could be improved by leveraging state programs or combining with other actions. Reduce vulnerability 52 Acquisition program Lowest priority from CAPG – unsure which structures would be relevant within PA limits. Likely to score moderate-high because of impact and equity benefits. Relies on baseline assessments. Mitigate energy-related GHG emissions 69 Low-impact development This actions focuses on eliminating barriers for LID and using pilot LID projects. Likely to score low-moderate due to low impact. Would be strengthened by combining with “green incentive program.” Mitigate energy-related GHG emissions 71 Green energy No Low priority from CAPG. Combined with the BPA renewal agreement action (#5), which was in the MCA. Was evaluated as part of BPA renewal agreement Mitigate energy-related GHG emissions 74 Efficient outdoor lighting Connect to other City-led ongoing efforts. Likely to score low due to low impact and low- moderate on most other criteria. Mitigate energy-related GHG emissions 75 Promote Green Business certification Low priority from CAPG. Likely to score low due to low impact. Could be integrated with City and community sustainable purchasing as an incentive. Promote sustainable consumption 22 Asphalt recycling plant Already reviewed feasibility in 2013. If an action, should focus on State legislation. Likely to score low-moderate due to higher impact sector but higher costs and moderate on other benefits (i.e., not a promising green sector). Promote sustainable consumption 56 Water consumption education/incen tives Focus on incentives for individual water conservation. Likely to score similar but lower than “comprehensive climate change education and outreach” Eliminate/redu ce single use plastics 105 Single use plastics Had ban in 2018, but 2021 state law circumvented it (have thick plastic Likely to score similar to City and community waste diversion actions (low-moderate). Appendix J March 1, 2022 | 22 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Strategy Action # Action Short Name Include in Plan? Why Excluded from MCA? Implications of MCA Results bags so not considered single use). High CAPG priority. Increase diversion from landfills 106 Circular economy Will require partnership with community organizations (e.g., Around-Again, Habitat Store, Goodwill, Serenity, House Thrift Store). Circular economy, in general, is a key gap in actions that were evaluated and is needed to meet carbon neutrality by 2030. This action is likely to score moderate-high. Promote sustainable consumption 108 Producer responsibility Low priority from CAPG. Will have to be at a state policy level. Likely to score moderate due to higher impact but low-moderate on other factors. Actions evaluated through the MCA The results shown here are the same as those provided in the Multi-Criteria Analysis Results section. We have copied them here and organized them by sector to reduce the need to scroll to the MCA results during discussion at the March 1 CAPG workshop. Sector Color Coding: Community Resilience & Wellbeing | Ecosystem Health | Transportation | Buildings & Energy | Consumption & Waste Strategy Action # Action Short Name Impact Cost Feasibility Community Support Equity Co- Benefits Priority Score Increase community adaptive capacity 8 City price on carbon 3.33 2.67 3.50 2.00 2.00 3.00 2.8 Increase community adaptive capacity 13 Sustainable agriculture 3.00 2.67 4.00 5.00 3.50 3.33 3.4 Prepare for extreme events 14 Wildland urban interface 2.67 3.67 5.00 3.00 3.50 2.67 3.4 Increase community adaptive capacity 17 SLR vulnerability assessment 2.67 4.33 4.50 4.00 3.00 3.33 3.5 Increase community adaptive capacity 36 Climate migration policy 3.67 4.67 3.50 3.00 4.00 3.33 3.8 Increase community adaptive capacity 115 Hazard Mitigation Plan implementation 2.00 3.33 3.50 4.00 4.00 4.00 3.3 Increase community adaptive capacity 45 City asset vulnerability 2.00 4.00 4.50 4.00 3.50 2.33 3.3 Appendix J March 1, 2022 | 23 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Strategy Action # Action Short Name Impact Cost Feasibility Community Support Equity Co- Benefits Priority Score Prepare for extreme events 47 Flood vulnerability and risk 2.00 4.33 2.50 4.00 3.50 1.00 2.9 Increase community adaptive capacity 59 Water supply monitoring & enhancement 2.67 3.33 3.50 4.00 4.50 3.33 3.5 Increase community adaptive capacity 119 Comprehensive climate outreach & education 2.00 4.33 4.00 3.00 5.00 3.33 3.6 Increase community adaptive capacity 116 Housing Action Plan implementation 3.33 3.67 4.00 4.50 5.00 3.67 4.0 Prepare for extreme events 86 Climate resilience & emergency planning 2.33 4.67 4.50 4.00 4.00 3.33 3.7 Restore and protect natural habitat 9 Urban tree canopy, parks, and open space 2.33 3.67 5.00 4.00 3.50 4.00 3.6 Restore and protect natural habitat 24 Shoreline Master Program updates 2.33 4.33 3.50 4.00 3.00 3.00 3.3 Restore and protect natural habitat 25 Critical area protection 2.33 4.00 3.50 4.00 3.00 3.00 3.2 Restore and protect natural habitat 26 Harmful algal bloom monitoring 2.67 4.00 4.50 4.00 3.00 2.00 3.3 Restore and protect natural habitat 27 Salmon habitat protection 2.33 3.33 3.00 4.00 3.00 2.67 3.0 Increase carbon sequestration potential 28 Extension of timber harvest rotation 3.00 3.33 3.00 3.00 3.00 2.67 3.0 Restore and protect natural habitat 37 Coastal erosion reduction 3.33 3.33 4.50 3.00 3.00 3.33 3.4 Restore and protect natural habitat 49 Native plant landscaping 1.67 2.33 4.50 3.00 3.00 2.67 2.7 Restore and protect natural habitat 51 Wildlife corridors 2.33 2.67 4.50 4.00 3.50 2.33 3.1 Increase opportunities for carbon 114 Forest and marine habitat preservation 5.00 3.33 2.50 4.50 4.00 4.00 3.9 Appendix J March 1, 2022 | 24 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Strategy Action # Action Short Name Impact Cost Feasibility Community Support Equity Co- Benefits Priority Score sequestration and storage Decrease transportation GHG emissions 1 Transit infrastructure, equity, & safety 3.67 3.00 3.50 3.00 5.00 3.33 3.7 Decrease transportation GHG emissions 30 Increase EV use for general public 3.67 4.33 4.50 3.00 3.00 2.33 3.6 Decrease transportation GHG emissions 31 Biking and walking infrastructure 3.33 2.67 4.00 5.00 3.00 3.00 3.4 Decrease transportation GHG emissions 32 Municipal fleet electrification & idle reduction 2.67 3.33 2.50 4.00 5.00 3.00 3.4 Increase transportation resiliency 35 Transportation vulnerability 2.33 3.67 3.50 4.50 3.50 3.33 3.3 Increase resiliency of energy systems 2 Community renewable energy grid 3.67 2.67 3.50 3.00 5.00 3.67 3.6 Mitigate energy- related GHG emissions 3 Energy efficiency retrofits 2.67 2.33 4.50 3.00 4.00 2.33 3.1 Mitigate energy- related GHG emissions 4 Energy efficient home heating sources 2.67 2.33 4.50 3.00 4.50 2.33 3.2 Mitigate energy- related GHG emissions 5 BPA renewal agreement 2.33 2.00 3.00 3.00 4.00 3.33 2.9 Mitigate energy- related GHG emissions 10 Net metering monitoring 2.33 3.33 4.50 4.00 3.00 2.00 3.1 Appendix J March 1, 2022 | 25 Port Angeles Resiliency Plan Strategy Action # Action Short Name Impact Cost Feasibility Community Support Equity Co- Benefits Priority Score Mitigate energy- related GHG emissions 11 Green Building standards 2.67 3.00 4.00 2.00 3.00 3.67 3.0 Reduce vulnerability 48 Climate-smart finance policies 3.33 3.00 3.50 3.50 3.50 3.00 3.3 Reduce vulnerability 64 Retrofit buildings for vulnerability 3.33 3.00 4.00 4.00 3.50 3.33 3.5 Mitigate energy- related GHG emissions 83 EV parking requirements 3.67 2.67 3.50 2.00 4.50 3.33 3.4 Promote sustainable consumption 7 City and community sustainable purchasing 4.00 3.33 5.00 3.50 3.00 3.00 3.7 Decrease waste- related GHG emissions 19 Wastewater facility GHG 2.33 5.00 5.00 3.50 3.00 3.67 3.7 Promote sustainable consumption 20 Commercial food waste diversion programs 2.33 2.67 4.50 4.00 4.00 3.33 3.3 Promote sustainable consumption 21 Residential food waste diversion programs 2.00 3.67 5.00 4.00 3.00 2.67 3.3 Appendix J