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Agenda Packet 06/18/2019�a JUNE 189 2019 City of Port Angeles Council Meeting Agenda City Council Chambers, 321 East 5th Street The Mayor may determine the order of business for a particular City Council meeting. The agenda should be arranged to best serve the needs and/or convenience of the Council and the public. The Mayor will determine time of break. Hearing devices are available for those needing assistance. The items of business for regular Council meetings may include the following: A. Call to Order — Special Meeting 4:30-5:00 — Closed Session to be held under authority of RCW 42.30.140(4) (b), to adopt or plan the strategy or position to be taken by the City during the course of any collective bargaining, professional negotiations, or reviewing the proposals made in the negotiations. 5:00 p.m. — Budget Goals Work Session 5-6: 00 p. m. — Open to the public Call to Order — Regular Meeting at 6:00 p.m. B. Roll Call, Pledge of Allegiance Ceremonial Matters, Proclamations & Employee Recognitions C. Public Comment The City Council desires to allow the opportunity for Public Comment. However, the business of the City must proceed in an orderly, timely manner. At its most restrictive, Public Comment shall be limited to a total of 15 minutes for the first Public Comment period and shall be concluded not later than 9:45 p.m. for the second Public Comment period. Individuals may speak for three minutes or less, depending on the number of people wishing to speak. If more than 20 people are signed up to speak, each speaker may be allocated two minutes (Council Rules of Procedure Section 12). D. Late Items To be placed on this or future agendas, including any executive session needed during or at the end of the meeting. E. Consent Agenda I Approve 1. City Council Minutes of June 4, 2019 /Approve Agenda............................................................................................... E-1 2. Expenditure Report: From May 25, 2019 through June 7, 2019 in the amount of $808,626.95 /Approve Report......... E-5 F. Public Hearings 16:30 p.m. or Soon Thereafter 1. 2020-2025 Capital Facilities Plan and Transportation Improvement Plan/ Conduct Second Reading /Pass Resolution ......................................................................................................................................................................................... F-1 2. 2019 Amendment to the Comprehensive Plan/ Conduct Second Reading /Adopt Ordinance ....................................... F-8 G. Ordinances Not Requiring Council Public Hearings 1. Amendments to the Electric Utility Port Angeles Municipal Code (changes do not affect rates) / Conduct First Reading of Ordinance / Continue to July 2 Meeting.......................................................................................................................... G-1 2. Amendments to the Wastewater Utility Port Angeles Municipal Code (changes do not affect rates) / Conduct First Reading of Ordinance / Continue to July 2 Meeting.......................................................................................................................... G-12 June 18, 2019 Port Angeles City Council Meeting Page 1 H. Resolutions Not Requiring Council Public Hearings.......................................................................................None L Other Considerations 1. Think Tank a. Compassion Charter Ideas b. Advisory Board Discussion c. Think Tank Agenda Items for Future Meetings J. Contracts & Purchasing...............................................................................................................................................None K Council Reports L. Information City Manager Reports: 1. Bi -Monthly Construction Status Report ..........................................................................................................................L-1 2. Bi -Monthly Grants and Loans Status Report ...................................................................................................................L-2 3. Drought Condition — Voluntary Water Curtailment / Information Only......................................................................... L-5 4. Parks, Recreation & Beautification Commission Minutes.............................................................................................. L-6 5. Surplus 2009 Tar Heater Trailer, Equipment #940.......................................................................................................... L-8 6. 2019 January -May Building Report ................................................................................................................................ L-9 M. Second Public Comment The City Council desires to allow the opportunity for Public Comment. However, the business of the City must proceed in an orderly, timely manner. At its most restrictive, Public Comment shall be limited to a total of 15 minutes for the first Public Comment period and shall be concluded not later than 9:45 p.m. for the second Public Comment period. Individuals may speak for three minutes or less, depending on the number of people wishing to speak. If more than 20 people are signed up to speak, each speaker may be allocated two minutes (Council Rules of Procedure Section 12). Adjournment PUBLIC HEARINGS Public hearings are set by the City Council in order to meet legal requirements. City Council may set a public hearing in order to receive public input prior to making decisions which impact citizens. Certain matters may be controversial and City Council may choose to seek public opinion through the public hearing process. June 18, 2019 Port Angeles City Council Meeting Page 2 THE ,,, I BUDGET OVERVIEW - REVENUES im F:1iropeirty rax Sales rax utility"'razes relephone rax Building (including F:lerrn itsflF:11 an Criminal Check F::ees Q ON Co Ln 00A wl M",/,/,/,Ell, 64 Lodging rax IFF "'r i & REE r riminspoirtation 11 Benefit District rax justice) �2W 7 Kim 20 1I 8 20 1I 9 Y FllChange firoirn 201I8 8.V/o . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. 15.0% ff MIN 6"w �Mmw 35.0% ........... ... ..... .. . . . . . ............................. BUDGET OVERVIEW — EXPENDITURES ' 4 i�� Year-to-clate all expenditures Citywide are on track. ",qlq U tip Expenditures have consistently gone down over the last 3 years in all areas except salaries and wages. Additional $787,000 placed into reserves in 2018. 11111111111 Staffing vacancies BUDGET OVERVIEW m DEBT ,' q.M W Ir. 00 (n 0 .1 eq M q.M W lr%. 00 X34 0 r q eq M q.M W lr%. 00 (n 0 .1 eq M ko lr%. BUDGET OVERVIEW - RESERVES 7,000,000 6,000,000 5,000,000 4,000,000 3,000,000 2,000,000 IFuind/Casllh I13allaince irequired % of 20 9 Expenditures — — Fund I13allaince I arget L W BUDGET OVERVIEW — RESERVES Hold $157,000 in reserves for anticipated revenues from McKinley mill startup Estimated additional $350,000 needed for the $1.0 million balloon payment for the Niichel property. Capital projects. 7 11 7 FINANCIAL POLICIES Council to consider the communities "ability to pay" prior to any tax, utility rate or fee increases. (Section 2.2) (Section 2.3.1) TAX & REET funding sources should not be used to pay debt or long-term commitments. (Section 2.9.1) recurring expenses. (Section 2.12.1) FINANCIAL POLICIES i�� A conservative revenue approach will be taken when developing the budget. 1- LL i�� Additional operating expenditures will only be proposed U if there are on-going supported revenues. (Section 3.3.1) C Qi i�� The General Fund will maintain a 25% fund balance. i, io UPCOMING ITEMS JUNE City Council Budget Goals Worksession 18 JUNE - Departmental Budget Entry JULY AUG - City Manager meetings with Departments SEPT Budget Balancing OCT 2020 Preliminary Budget Document distributed AA 12 C U ru W�m �96*4���� C�7 City Council Meeting PUBLIC COMMENT SIGN-UP SHEET June 18, 2019 Print Name Clearly Are you a City of Port Angeles . .resident or business owner? Yes or No • TO1C or No Yes or No Yes or No Yes or No Yes or No Yes or No Yes or No Yes or No Yes or No Page 1 CITY COUNCIL MEETING Port Angeles, Washington June 4, 2019 CALL TO ORDER -REGULAR MEETING Mayor Bruch called the regular meeting of the Port Angeles City Council to order at 6:00 p.m. ROLL CALL Members Present: Mayor Bruch; Deputy Mayor Dexter; Councilmembers French, Kidd, Merideth, Moran, and Schromen-Wawrin. Members Absent: None Staff Present: City Manager West, Attorney Bloor, Clerk Martinez -Bailey, C. Delikat, K. Dubuc, B. Smith, D. Wechner, S. Carrizosa, S. Shere, and B. Braudrick. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE: Mayor Bruch led the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag. CEREMONIAL MATTERS, PROCLAMATIONS & EMPLOYEE RECOGNITIONS 1. Maritime Festival Proclamation Mayor Bruch presented Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Mark Abshire with a proclamation celebrating the Port Angeles Maritime Festival, organized by the Port of Port Angeles, Port Angeles Yacht Club, Chamber of Commerce, the North Olympic History Center, as well as numerous businesses, and local individuals. 2. "Pink Up" Port Angeles Proclamation Mayor Bruch presented Councilmember Kidd and several members of the Soroptimist International of Port Angeles Noon Club with the "Pink Up Port Angeles" Proclamation, inviting the entire community to join together and dedicate the week of June 15-22, 2019, to fighting cancer. 3. Recognition of Port Angeles High School Emmy Award Nominees Port Angeles High School Communication Technology Instructor Patric McInnis, spoke about the significance of the student Emmy nominations through the National Academy of Arts and Sciences. Mayor Bruch presented Ethan Musalek (not present), Malleck Braun, Carter Holm, Nathaniel Perry, and Colby Backman with certificates recognizing their achievements. PUBLIC COMMENT Marolee Smith, city resident, spoke about the need for sidewalks near her home in the Mount Angeles area. Jeff Bohman, city resident, spoke about the student nominees that were recognized and provided background on the significance of the nomination. LATE ITEMS TO BE PLACED ON THIS OR FUTURE AGENDAS as determined by City Manager or Councilmember — Acting Attorney Bloor brought the late item - Consideration of the Use of the City Logo by the League of Women Voters. Bloor reminded Council they would need to have consensus in order to add the item to the agenda. By a motion from Councilmember French with no second, by consensus of the Council, the late item was added to the agenda. June 18, 2019 E-1 PORT ANGELES CITY COUNCIL MEETING — June 4, 2019 CONSENT AGENDA It was moved by Dexter and seconded by French to approve the Consent Agenda to include: 1. City Council Minutes of May 21, 2019 /Approve Minutes 2. Expenditure Report: From May 11, 2019 to May 24, 2019 in the amount of $2,389,665.97 /Approve Expenditure Report 3. Replacement of Light Operations Vehicle #6902 / Approve and authorize the City Manager to sign a contract for the purchase and outfitting of a new Light Operations pick-up truck in an amount not to exceed $36,400, 2. Approve and authorize the City Manager to make minor modifications to the contract if necessary, 3. Approve and authorize the City Manager to surplus vehicle #6902, when the new vehicle is placed into service. 4. Replacement of Parks Department Vehicle #4400 /Approve and authorize the City Manager to sign a contract for the purchase and outfitting of a new Parks Department van in an amount not to exceed $41,600. 2. Approve and authorize the City Manager to make minor modifications to the contract if necessary. 3. Approve and authorize the City Manager to surplus vehicle #4400, once the new vehicle is placed into service. 5. Lodging Tax Appointments / Confirm the recommendations of the ad hoc committee and appoint Jane Vanderhoof to a citizen -at -large position, and to appoint Peter Stolinsky to represent the Port Angeles Forward Committee on the LTAC. 6. David Wechner Professional Services Agreement /Approve Professional Services Agreement with David Wechner and authorize the City Manager to sign the agreement. Motion carried 7-0. OTHER CONSIDERATIONS 2. Consideration of Use of the City Log by the League of Women Voters Council discussion followed. It was moved by French and seconded by Dexter to: Agree to the request by the League of Women Voters of Clallam County for the City's partnership on the Sequim- Dungeness-area water education project in 2019 and 2020, for support in the areas of venues, making contacts, and promotion. Motion carried 7-0. PUBLIC HEARINGS 1. 2020-2025 Capital Facilities Plan and Transportation Improvement Plan Acting Manager Bloor introduced the agenda item and said questions asked during the Council meeting would be noted and answered at the next Council meeting. Finance Director Sarina Carrizosa introduced the proposed Capital Facilities Plan. The Mayor opened the public hearing at 6:38 p.m. The Mayor conducted the first reading of the resolution, titled, entitled, RESOLUTION NO. A RESOLUTION of the City Council of the City of Port Angeles, Washington, adopting the City's Capital Facilities Plan for 2020 — 2025, which includes the City's Transportation Improvement Program for the years 2020 -2025. Joseph Nevis, city resident, spoke about land use and eminent domain, including White Creek. Jim Haguewood, president of Chamber of Commerce, shared a history of the Chamber and their goals to make the community better. Christopher Thompson, Vice President of the Chamber of Commerce, spoke about the Chamber's work and provided their recommendations to designate Phase III Water Front Redevelopment as active, designate Railroad Avenue as an arterial road, and explore partnerships for City Pier maintenance and management. Page 2 of 4 June 18, 2019 E - 2 PORT ANGELES CITY COUNCIL MEETING — June 4, 2019 Mace Gratz, city resident, discussed the need for sidewalks along Mount Angeles, in particular, at the intersections of Craig, Olympus and Grant Avenues. Marolee Smith, city resident, spoke about commercial internet. Beth Whitters, Vice -President of the Downtown Association, said the Association would like to be involved in the scope of the projects that take place in regards to a redevelopment. Council discussion followed. Schromen-Wawrin and French seconded to: Request staff to share a presentation at the next City Council meeting, a detailed presentation, specifically covering the Waterfront Redevelopment Project (TRO 113), the Railroad Avenue Arterial (TR0818), Downtown Improvement Plan (GG0219) and any City Pier projects deemed relevant, to provide the Council and the public a better understanding of these projects and their interactions. Motion carried 7-0. The Mayor continued the public hearing to June 18. 2. 2019 Amendment to the Comprehensive Plan Interim Community and Economic Development Director Dave Wechner, introduced Associate Planner Ben Braudrick who shared background on the amendment process and provided a PowerPoint slide that listed the motions Council made on September 18, 2019, related to the amendment process. He noted the Planning Commission decided on February, 22"d, 2019 to have additional public comment in order to add a land use map. Planner Braudrick recommended Council open the public hearing and continue it to the June 18 meeting. Mayor Bruch opened the public hearing at 7:26 p.m. Mayor Bruch read the proposed ordinance titled, and entitled, ORDINANCE NO. AN ORDINANCE of the City of Port Angeles, Washington adopting a new Amended Comprehensive Plan Marolee Smith, city resident, spoke about the airport. Council discussion followed. The Mayor continued the public hearing to June 18. CONTINUED OTHER CONSIDERATIONS 1. Consideration of the Schedule of Future Think Tanks Mayor Bruch opened the discussion and said she and the City Manager will determine when the Think Tanks will be scheduled, adding the meetings will be scheduled once a month, as the agenda allows. She also noted that she and the City Manager will determine agenda items for Think Tank meetings. CONTRACTS & PURCHASING 1. Complete Streets Grant Acceptance Francis Street ADA Ramp Project Shailesh Shere introduced the agenda item and provided background on the project. Council discussion followed. It was moved by Kidd and seconded by French to: Accept the Washington State Transportation Improvement Board Complete Streets grant in the amount of $300,000 and authorize the City Manager to execute an agreement for the grant. Motion carried 7-0. Page 3 of 4 June 18, 2019 E - 3 PORT ANGELES CITY COUNCIL MEETING — June 4, 2019 CITY COUNCIL REPORTS Councilmember Moran spoke about Council reports and suggested the Council have a discussion on Council reports to determine whether they are necessary or not. Councilmember French shared he attended meetings for the Homelessness Task Force, Downtown Association, and VIMO Board. He spoke about the Rediscovery Program and discussed future funding. He shared he attended the Boy's and Girl's Club ground breaking ceremony. Councilmember Schromen-Wawrin shared his experience at the Port of Port Angeles master plan meeting he attended along with Councilmember Moran and Parks and Recreation Director Delikat. He spoke about his attendance at the Association of Washington Cities event. Deputy Mayor Dexter shared her experience at the Mayor's and Entrepreneurial conference, said it was paid for 100% by the Kaufman Foundation. She invited the Council to join her on the 5-2-1-0 Challenge. She also spoke about an event at Feiro Marine Life Center. Councilmember Merideth spoke about his attendance at the William Shore Memorial Pool District Board meeting. Councilmember Kidd shared her interest in a discussion on guidelines and parameters for council reports. Mayor Bruch spoke about the recent Lauridsen Trust meeting she attended. She spoke about issues that were brought up to her by members of the public during her attendance at the Farmer's Market. She spoke about the upcoming Clallam County Lodging Tax Advisory Committee meeting and shared there were new tables and chairs are at the transit station downtown. No other reports were given. INFORMATION Acting Manager and City Attorney Bloor spoke regarding the reports included in the packet for their review and reminded Council about the upcoming Budget Goals Work Session at the June 18 meeting. SECOND PUBLIC COMMENT Marolee Smith, city resident, shared she enjoyed council reports and added she hoped to see more town hall meetings. Amy Miller, invited the Council to an upcoming picnic. Tera Dummitt, city resident, suggested Council keep their reports but limit the time of each reports. Joseph Nevis, city resident, spoke about the Comprehensive Plan. Gail Brauner, city resident, spoke about the recent experiences residents have had where they have felt intimidated by the actions of individuals' downtown. ADJOURNMENT Mayor Bruch adjourned the meeting at 8:11 p.m. Sissi Bruch Mayor Page 4 of 4 Kari Martinez -Bailey, City Clerk June 18, 2019 E - 4 Finance Department Sarina Carrizosa Finance Director Trina McKee Senior Accountant MarySue French Senior Accountant Linda Kheriaty Financial Systems Analyst Melody Schneider Accountant Jane Perkins Payroll Specialist Julie Powell Accounting Technician Jason Jones Accounting Technician Nicole Blank Administrative Analyst Kathyellen Haney Customer Services Manager Tracy Rooks Utility Billing Specialist 11 P T'', NGELES A W A S H I N G T 0 N, U. S. A. June 18, 2019 We, the undersigned City Officials of the City of Port Angeles, do hereby certify that the merchandise and/or services herein specified have been received and that these claims are approved for payment in the amount of $808,626.95 this 18th day of June, 2019. T <b Mayor City Manager City of Port Angeles i City Council Expenditure Report ,C,,,ff, Between May 25, 2019 and Jun 7, 2019 Vendor A/R MISCELLANEOUS REFUNDS AIRPRO EQUIPMENT, INC Description FEMA 009-55365-00 REFUND DUPLICATE PMT INV #62838 OVERPMT RECORDS REQ FEES Personal items -Reimbursed Personal items -Reimbursed MISC BUILDING PERMIT REFUNDS MISC DEPOSIT & PERMIT REFUNDS CAMPFIRE CLUBHOUSE DEPOSI VERN BURTON DEPOSIT REFUN VERN BURTON DEPOSIT REFUN VERN BURTON DEPOSIT REFUN VERN BURTON DEPOSIT REFUN VERN BURTON DEPOSIT REFUN Division Total: Department Total: SOUND PUBLISHING INC City Clerk Division Total: City Manager Department Total: PACIFIC OFFICE EQUIPMENT INC Accounting Division Total: ELAVON, INC -WIRE EQUIFAX FEDERAL EXPRESS CORP SWAIN'S GENERAL STORE INC WASHINGTON (DRS), STATE OF Customer Service Division Total: PACIFIC OFFICE EQUIPMENT INC Reprographics Division Total: Finance Department Total: BECKWITH, THOMAS E JR OLYMPIC STATIONERS INC SOUND PUBLISHING INC Page 1 of 18 June 18, 2019 COMMUNICATIONS/MEDIA SERV OFFICE SUPPLIES, GENERAL 3rd Party Cr Card Fees FINANCIAL SERVICES COMMUNICATIONS/MEDIA SERV FIRST AID & SAFETY EQUIP. FIRST AID & SAFETY EQUIP. INSURANCE, ALL TYPES PAPER (OFFICE,PRINT SHOP) CONSULTING SERVICES ENVELOPES, PLAIN, PRINTED PUBLICATION/AUDIOVISUAL PUBLICATION/AUDIOVISUAL PUBLICATION/AUDIOVISUAL PUBLICATION/AUDIOVISUAL Account Number Amount 001-0000-213.10-90 39,140.70 001-0000-213.10-90 70.00 001-0000-213.10-90 5.85 001-0000-213.10-00 9.17 001-0000-213.10-00 (9.17) 001-0000-239.20-00 2,832.49 001-0000-239.10-00 50.00 001-0000-239.10-00 50.00 001-0000-239.10-00 200.00 001-0000-239.10-00 200.00 001-0000-239.10-00 250.00 001-0000-239.10-00 250.00 $43,049.04 $43,049.04 001-1230-514.44-10 39.92 $39.92 $39.92 001-2023-514.31-01 431.65 $431.65 001-2025-514.41-50 10,539.62 001-2025-514.41-50 166.68 001-2025-514.41-50 56.66 001-2025-514.31-11 108.42 001-2025-514.31-11 180.16 001-2025-514.20-30 14,531.28 $25,582.82 001-2070-518.31-01 61.08 $61.08 $26,075.55 001-4060-558.41-50 2,600.00 001-4060-558.31-01 36.61 001-4060-558.41-15 93.22 001-4060-558.41-15 56.88 001-4060-558.41-15 56.88 001-4060-558.41-15 45.82 Jun 12, 2019 9:33:10 AM E-5 City of Port Angeles City Council Expenditure Report r, Between May 25, 2019 and Jun 7, 2019 ;+IAnk�t Vendor Description SOUND PUBLISHING INC PUBLICATION/AUDIOVISUAL Planning Division Total: Community Development Department Total: MISC TRAVEL B SMITH -WA ASSOC OF SHERI DOMBROWSKI-MTG FOR STONEG Police Administration Division Total: MISC TRAVEL Investigation Division Total: DROPP-GSK/SHEN PRESENTATI E SMITH-GSK/SHEN PRESENTA MARTIN-GSK/SHEN PRESENTAT PENINGER-WHIA CONF ARAND-GSK/SHEN PRESENTATI FREDS AUTO WRECKING, EXTERNAL LABOR SERVICES TOWING/REPAIR (50.00) HOME DEPOT PRO-SUPPLYWORKS FIRST AID & SAFETY EQUIP. INTOXIMETERS INC POLICE EQUIPMENT & SUPPLY JIM'S PHARMACY INC HOSP SURG ACCES & SUNDRIS LINCOLN STREET STATION EXTERNAL LABOR MISC TRAVEL BALDERSON-DT OC INSTRUCTO K COOPER -PRE -SUPERVISOR C PORT ANGELES POLICE Bridge Toll DEPARTMENT SOUND UNIFORM SOLUTIONS/BRATWEAR WA STATE CRIMINAL JUSTICE Patrol Division Total: CROSS MATCH TECHNOLOGIES INC LEIRA MISC TRAVEL QUILL CORPORATION Records Division Total: Page 2 of 18 June 18, 2019 CLOTHING & APPAREL CLOTHING & APPAREL HUMAN SERVICES HUMAN SERVICES HUMAN SERVICES HUMAN SERVICES DATA PROC SERV &SOFTWARE HUMAN SERVICES HUMAN SERVICES LEMON -PUBLIC RECORDS TRAI COMPUTERS,DP & WORD PROC Account Number 001-4060-558.41-15 001-5010-521.43-10 001-5010-521.43-10 001-5021-521.43-10 001-5021-521.43-10 001-5021-521.43-10 001-5021-521.43-10 001-5021-521.43-10 001-5022-521.49-90 001-5022-521.31-01 001-5022-521.35-01 001-5022-521.31-01 001-5022-521.42-10 001-5022-521.43-10 001-5022-521.43-10 001-5022-521.43-10 001-5022-521.31-11 001-5022-521.31-11 001-5022-521.43-10 001-5022-521.43-10 001-5022-521.43-10 001-5022-521.43-10 001-5029-594.64-10 Amount 63.20 $2,952.61 $2,952.61 76.25 27.50 $103.75 288.00 288.00 288.00 82.50 451.29 $1,397.79 488.25 101.48 143.48 39.64 10.94 537.88 1.78 6.00 450.54 456.54 375.00 400.00 150.00 200.00 $3,361.53 3,518.76 001-5029-521.43-10 50.00 001-5029-521.43-10 (50.00) 001-5029-521.43-10 264.31 001-5029-521.31-01 305.22 $4,088.29 Jun 12, 2019 9:33:10 AM E-6 IZ3 City of Port Angeles City Council Expenditure Report Between May 25, 2019 and Jun 7, 2019 Vendor Description Account Number Amount Police Department Total: $8,951.36 ACTIVE 911, INC MEMBERSHIPS 001-6010-522.42-13 762.50 PACIFIC OFFICE EQUIPMENT INC PAPER (OFFICE,PRINT SHOP) 001-6010-522.31-01 128.92 Fire Administration Division Total: $891.42 BAXTER AUTO PARTS #15 JANITORIAL SUPPLIES 001-6020-522.31-02 63.30 CURTIS & SONS INC, L N CLOTHING & APPAREL 001-6020-522.31-11 193.98 PACIFIC OFFICE EQUIPMENT INC OFFICE SUPPLY, INKS,LEADS 001-6020-522.31-01 125.05 PORT ANGELES POWER EQUIP MAINT & REPAIR SERV 001-6020-522.31-01 291.81 EQUIPMENT SEAWESTERN INC CLOTHING & APPAREL 001-6020-522.31-11 238.32 CLOTHING & APPAREL 001-6020-522.20-80 317.51 SWAIN'S GENERAL STORE INC ACOUST TILE, INSULAT MAT 001-6020-522.31-02 130.24 WA STATE PATROL HUMAN SERVICES 001-6020-522.43-10 7,185.60 Fire Suppression Division Total: $8,545.81 PORT ANGELES FIRE Support Officer's Lunch 001-6021-522.31-01 76.00 DEPARTMENT Fire Volunteers Division Total: $76.00 MISC TRAVEL INGRAHAM-SUPERIOR TRAININ 001-6045-522.43-10 32.30 Fire Training Division Total: $32.30 Fire Department Total: $9,545.53 COMPUNET, INC COMPUTER SOFTWARE FOR MIC 001-7010-532.31-80 23.90 DRAKE'S PIZZA & SUBS SUPPLIES 001-7010-532.31-01 108.75 MISC BUILDING PERMIT REFUNDS 001-7010-343.20-00 133.62 MISC EMPLOYEE EXPENSE REIMBURSEMENT FOR INTERVI 001-7010-532.43-10 1,456.99 REIMBURSEMENT Public Works Admin. Division Total: $1,723.26 Public Works & Utilities Department Total: $1,723.26 OLYMPIC PRINTERS INC SUPPLIES 001-8012-555.31-01 461.98 SHI INTERNATIONAL CORP COMPUTER HARDWARE&PERIPHE 001-8012-555.31-01 144.57 Senior Center Division Total: $606.55 ANGELES MILLWORK & LUMBER SUPPLIES 001-8050-536.31-20 34.37 SUPPLIES 001-8050-536.31-20 43.86 SUPPLIES 001-8050-536.31-20 14.80 SUPPLIES 001-8050-536.31-20 60.26 ASCO PACIFIC SUPPLY CO INC SUPPLIES 001-8050-536.31-20 1,768.10 QUIRING MONUMENTS INC SUPPLIES 001-8050-536.34-01 384.00 Page 3 of 18 Jun 12, 2019 9:33:10 AM June 18, 2019 E - 7 $w'-Iff, City of Port Angeles City Council Expenditure Report Between May 25, 2019 and Jun 7, 2019 Vendor Description Account Number Amount QUIRING MONUMENTS INC SUPPLIES 001-8050-536.34-01 384.00 SUPPLIES 001-8050-536.34-01 931.00 SUPPLIES 001-8050-536.34-01 190.00 SUPPLIES 001-8050-536.34-01 250.00 SUPPLIES 001-8050-536.34-01 250.00 SUPPLIES 001-8050-536.34-01 250.00 THURMAN SUPPLY SUPPLIES 001-8050-536.31-20 237.66 Ocean View Cemetery Division Total: $4,798.05 ANGELES MILLWORK & LUMBER SUPPLIES 001-8080-576.48-10 38.53 BILL'S PLUMBING & HEATING INC SUPPLIES 001-8080-576.48-10 190.00 BLAKE SAND & GRAVEL, INC SUPPLIES 001-8080-576.31-40 1,620.06 CASTLE BRANCH, INC SUPPLIES 001-8080-576.49-90 928.00 FASTENAL INDUSTRIAL SUPPLIES 001-8080-576.31-20 29.00 HOME DEPOT PRO-SUPPLYWORKS SUPPLIES 001-8080-576.31-20 11.22 JENNINGS EQUIPMENT INC SUPPLIES 001-8080-576.31-01 586.49 SKAGIT GARDENS INC SUPPLIES 001-8080-576.31-40 3,847.24 SWAIN'S GENERAL STORE INC SUPPLIES 001-8080-576.31-20 21.10 SUPPLIES 001-8080-576.31-40 184.81 SUPPLIES 001-8080-576.31-40 395.19 THURMAN SUPPLY SUPPLIES 001-8080-576.31-20 44.27 SUPPLIES 001-8080-576.31-20 17.07 SUPPLIES 001-8080-576.31-20 128.27 Parks Facilities Division Total: $8,041.25 Parks & Recreation Department Total: $13,445.85 DAVE'S HEATING & COOLING SVC SUPPLIES 001-8112-555.48-10 288.06 DEPT OF LABOR & INDUSTRIES SUPPLIES 001-8112-555.48-10 24.23 Senior Center Facilities Division Total: $312.29 ANGELES MILLWORK & LUMBER SUPPLIES 001-8131-518.35-01 14.17 CED/CONSOLIDATED ELEC DIST SUPPLIES 001-8131-518.31-20 12.72 SUPPLIES 001-8131-518.31-20 11.30 SUPPLIES 001-8131-518.31-20 271.75 SUPPLIES 001-8131-518.31-20 19.22 CONTRACT HARDWARE INC SUPPLIES 001-8131-518.31-20 (43.48) FERGUSON ENTERPRISES INC SUPPLIES 001-8131-518.31-20 217.57 HARTNAGEL BUILDING SUPPLY INC SUPPLIES 001-8131-518.31-20 40.92 Page 4 of 18 Jun 12, 2019 9:33:10 AM June 18, 2019 E - 8 $w'-Iff, City of Port Angeles City Council Expenditure Report Between May 25, 2019 and Jun 7, 2019 Vendor Description Account Number Amount SEARS COMMERCIAL ONE SUPPLIES 001-8131-518.31-20 42.37 SUPPLIES 001-8131-518.31-80 86.95 SWAIN'S GENERAL STORE INC SUPPLIES 001-8131-518.31-20 88.72 THURMAN SUPPLY SUPPLIES 001-8131-518.31-20 78.20 SUPPLIES 001-8131-518.31-20 28.98 SUPPLIES 001-8131-518.31-20 2.91 SUPPLIES 001-8131-518.31-20 219.85 SUPPLIES 001-8131-518.31-20 23.45 SUPPLIES 001-8131-518.31-20 118.72 Central Svcs Facilities Division Total: $1,234.32 Facilities Maintenance Department Total: $1,546.61 COMA, ROBERT A REFEREE PAY FOR WOMEN'S B 001-8221-574.41-50 25.00 EDGAR, KELSEY REFEREE PAY FOR WOMEN'S B 001-8221-574.41-50 200.00 PIMENTEL, HENRY REFEREE PAY FOR WOMEN'S B 001-8221-574.41-50 350.00 RAMSEY, SCOTT REFEREE PAY FOR WOMEN'S B 001-8221-574.41-50 25.00 ROBINSON, JASON SCOREKEEPER PAY FOR WOMEN 001-8221-574.41-50 270.00 ROGERS, LAMBROS JR. REFEREE PAY FOR WOMEN'S B 001-8221-574.41-50 25.00 ROONEY, RANDY L REFEREE PAY FOR WOMEN'S B 001-8221-574.41-50 225.00 WA AMATEUR SOFTBALL ASSN FEE TO SANCTION SOFTBALL 001-8221-574.41-50 25.00 Sports Programs Division Total: $1,145.00 Recreation Activities Department Total: $1,145.00 General Fund Fund Total: $108,474.73 HURRICANE RIDGE WINTER MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES 101-1430-557.41-50 17,000.00 SPORTS CLUB PENINSULA ADVENTURE SPORTS MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES 101-1430-557.41-50 2,000.00 Lodging Excise Tax Division Total: $19,000.00 Lodging Excise Tax Department Total: $19,000.00 Lodging Excise Tax Fund Total: $19,000.00 ALPINE PRODUCTS, INC PW CONSTRUCTION & RELATED 102-7230-542.31-25 2,397.62 ANGELES MILLWORK & LUMBER SUPPLIES 102-7230-542.35-01 22.12 LAKESIDE INDUSTRIES INC ROAD/HWY MATERIALS ASPHLT 102-7230-542.31-20 281.23 PUD #1 OF CLALLAM COUNTY MISC PROFESSIONAL SERVICE 102-7230-542.47-10 18.89 SOUND PUBLISHING INC COMMUNICATIONS/MEDIA SERV 102-7230-542.41-15 184.61 TRAFFIC SAFETY SUPPLY CO MARKERS, PLAQUES,SIGNS 102-7230-542.31-25 1,562.56 MARKERS, PLAQUES,SIGNS 102-7230-542.31-25 2,054.43 Page 5 of 18 Jun 12, 2019 9:33:10 AM June 18, 2019 E-9 , 4 ,c,,,ff"". City of Port Angeles City Council Expenditure Report Between May 25, 2019 and Jun 7, 2019 Vendor Description Account Number Amount Street Division Total: $6,521.46 Public Works -Street Department Total: $6,521.46 Street Fund Total: $6,521.46 A WORKSAFE SERVICE, INC HEALTH RELATED SERVICES 107-5160-528.41-50 55.00 CLINICARE OF PORT ANGELES INC HEALTH RELATED SERVICES 107-5160-528.41-50 97.00 MISC TRAVEL D'AGOSTINO-KING CY EMD - 107-5160-528.43-11 2.53 HOMAN-WA APCO/NENA SUMMER 107-5160-528.43-11 823.25 ROMBERG-WA APCO/NENA SUMM 107-5160-528.43-11 1,319.32 JOHNSTON-KITAZAWA-KING CY 107-5160-528.43-11 2.53 ROMBERG-STATE E911 AUTH S 107-5160-528.43-11 311.96 PUBLIC SAFETY TESTING INC MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES 107-5160-528.41-50 50.00 QUILL CORPORATION SUPPLIES 107-5160-528.31-01 44.83 Pencom Division Total: $2,706.42 Pencom Department Total: $2,706.42 Pencom Fund Total: $2,706.42 MISC DEPOSIT & PERMIT REFUNDS CANCELLED LOOMIS RENTAL 316-8982-362.40-12 120.00 Park Improvmt Division Total: $120.00 Capital Proj-Parks & Rec Department Total: $120.00 Park Improvement Fund Fund Total: $120.00 ANIXTER, INC ELECTRICAL EQUIP & SUPPLY 401-0000-141.42-00 2,486.19 ELECTRICAL CABLES & WIRES 401-0000-141.42-00 2,470.75 CED/CONSOLIDATED ELEC DIST ELECTRICAL EQUIP & SUPPLY 401-0000-141.42-00 175.46 ELECTRICAL EQUIP & SUPPLY 401-0000-141.42-00 31.63 ELECTRICAL EQUIP & SUPPLY 401-0000-141.42-00 112.83 GENERAL PACIFIC INC ELECTRICAL EQUIP & SUPPLY 401-0000-141.42-00 3,363.83 ELECTRICAL EQUIP & SUPPLY 401-0000-141.41-00 303.82 MISC UTILITY DEPOSIT REFUNDS FINAL BILL REFUND 401-0000-122.10-99 10.02 FINAL BILL REFUND 401-0000-122.10-99 12.21 FINAL BILL REFUND 401-0000-122.10-99 46.43 FINAL BILL REFUND 401-0000-122.10-99 50.41 FINAL BILL REFUND 401-0000-122.10-99 70.19 FINAL BILL REFUND 401-0000-122.10-99 114.36 FINAL BILL REFUND 401-0000-122.10-99 157.96 FINAL BILL REFUND 401-0000-122.10-99 210.96 FINAL BILL REFUND 401-0000-122.10-99 250.00 Page 6 of 18 Jun 12, 2019 9:33:10 AM June 18, 2019 E-10 $w'-Iff, City of Port Angeles City Council Expenditure Report Between May 25, 2019 and Jun 7, 2019 Vendor Description Account Number Amount MISC UTILITY DEPOSIT REFUNDS FINAL BILL REFUND 401-0000-122.10-99 383.26 FINAL BILL REFUND 401-0000-122.10-99 751.32 FINAL BILL REFUND 401-0000-122.10-99 17.09 FINAL BILL REFUND 401-0000-122.10-99 100.82 FINAL BILL REFUND 401-0000-122.10-99 213.55 FINAL BILL REFUND 401-0000-122.10-99 410.22 OVERPAYMENT -1030 HOMESTEA 401-0000-122.10-99 2.75 OVERPAYMENT -1120 E 6TH ST 401-0000-122.10-99 33.83 OVERPAYMENT -1231 CAMPBELL 401-0000-122.10-99 90.01 OVERPAYMENT -1326 CAMPBELL 401-0000-122.10-99 90.69 OVERPAYMENT -921 W 15TH ST 401-0000-122.10-99 713.35 FINAL BILL REFUND 401-0000-122.10-99 22.17 FINAL BILL REFUND 401-0000-122.10-99 67.96 FINAL BILL REFUND 401-0000-122.10-99 125.38 FINAL BILL REFUND 401-0000-122.10-99 155.74 FINAL BILL REFUND 401-0000-122.10-99 252.93 FINAL BILL REFUND 401-0000-122.10-99 335.79 FINAL BILL REFUND 401-0000-122.10-99 375.04 FINAL BILL REFUND 401-0000-122.10-99 379.68 FINAL CREDIT -817 E 6TH ST 401-0000-122.10-99 41.33 Division Total: $14,429.96 Department Total: $14,429.96 EES CONSULTING INC MISC PROFESSIONAL SERVICE 401-7120-533.49-01 529.23 MARSH MUNDORF PRATT CONSULTING SERVICES 401-7120-533.49-01 528.67 SULLIVAN Power Systems Division Total: $1,057.90 AIRPORT GARDEN CENTER FEED, BEDDING,VIT-ANIMALS 401-7180-533.34-02 23.86 CED/CONSOLIDATED ELEC DIST ELECTRICAL EQUIP & SUPPLY 401-7180-533.34-02 128.27 FASTENAL INDUSTRIAL FASTENERS, FASTENING DEVS 401-7180-533.34-02 31.10 GLOBAL RENTAL COMPANY, INC RENTAL/LEASE EQUIPMENT 401-7180-533.45-30 3,815.00 RENTAL/LEASE EQUIPMENT 401-7180-533.45-30 (1,362.50) RENTAL/LEASE EQUIPMENT 401-7180-533.45-30 625.03 INSIGHT PUBLIC SECTOR COMPUTERS,DP & WORD PROC. 401-7180-533.34-02 1,071.08 KENNEDY, STEPHEN H. REAL PROPERTY, RENT/LEASE 401-7180-533.45-30 7,000.00 MATT'S TOOLS USA, LLC HAND TOOLS ,POW&NON POWER 401-7180-533.35-01 153.79 Page 7 of 18 Jun 12, 2019 9:33:10 AM June 18, 2019 E-11 City of Port Angeles i City Council Expenditure Report ,C,,,ff, Between May 25, 2019 and Jun 7, 2019 Vendor MATT'S TOOLS USA, LLC OLYMPIC SYNTHETIC PRODUCTS PORT ANGELES POWER EQUIPMENT POWER MONITORS INC ROHLINGER ENTERPRISES INC SHI INTERNATIONAL CORP SHOTWELL CORP, JONATHAN SWAIN'S GENERAL STORE INC THURMAN SUPPLY TYNDALE COMPANY UTILITIES UNDERGROUND LOC Description HAND TOOLS ,POW&NON POWER HARDWARE,AND ALLIED ITEMS HARDWARE,AND ALLIED ITEMS EQUIP MAINT & REPAIR SERV ELECTRICAL EQUIP & SUPPLY EXTERNAL LABOR ELECTRICAL EQUIP & SUPPLY TESTING&CALIBRATION SERVI TESTING&CALIBRATION SERVI TESTING&CALIBRATION SERVI TESTING&CALIBRATION SERVI COMPUTER HARDWARE&PERIPHE SEED,SOD,SOIL&INOCULANT EQUIP. MAINT. AUTO,TRUCK ELECTRICAL CABLES & WIRES FIRE PROTECTION EQUIP/SUP FIRE PROTECTION EQUIP/SUP FIRE PROTECTION EQUIP/SUP FIRE PROTECTION EQUIP/SUP FIRE PROTECTION EQUIP/SUP FIRE PROTECTION EQUIP/SUP FIRE PROTECTION EQUIP/SUP MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES CTR Electric Operations Division Total: Public Works -Electric Department Total: Electric Utility Fund Total: BACKFLOW PARTS USA PLUMBING EQUIP FIXT,SUPP Division Total: Department Total: AIRPORT GARDEN CENTER NURSERY STOCK & SUPPLIES AMAZON CAPITAL SERVICES SHIPPING AND HANDLING SUPPLIES BACKFLOW PARTS USA PLUMBING EQUIP FIXT,SUPP Account Number 401-7180-533.35-01 401-7180-533.35-01 401-7180-533.35-01 401-7180-533.48-10 401-7180-533.35-01 401-7180-533.31-01 401-7180-533.35-01 401-7180-533.48-10 401-7180-533.48-10 401-7180-533.48-10 401-7180-533.48-10 401-7180-533.31-01 401-7180-533.31-01 401-7180-533.31-01 401-7180-533.34-02 401-7180-533.31-01 401-7180-533.31-01 401-7180-533.31-01 401-7180-533.34-02 401-7180-533.31-01 401-7180-533.31-01 401-7180-533.31-01 401-7180-533.49-90 402-0000-237.00-00 402-7380-534.31-20 402-7380-534.31-01 402-7380-534.31-01 402-7380-534.31-20 Amount 219.32 369.99 299.81 91.99 82.94 20.03 3,886.03 62.77 266.62 706.01 209.80 186.96 500.00 5.95 37.93 242.29 240.83 934.62 311.54 216.73 757.53 50.77 33.49 $21,219.58 $22,277.48 $36,707.44 (47.94) ($47.94) ($47.94) 95.81 6.51 21.73 598.92 Page 8 of 18 Jun 12, 2019 9:33:10 AM June 18, 2019 E-12 $w'-Iff, City of Port Angeles City Council Expenditure Report Between May 25, 2019 and Jun 7, 2019 Vendor CASCADE COLUMBIA DISTRIBUTION, INC CLALLAM CNTY DEPT OF HEALTH DRY CREEK WATER ASSN, INC EDGE ANALYTICAL FASTENAL INDUSTRIAL FEDERAL EXPRESS CORP HEARTLINE MISC EMPLOYEE EXPENSE REIMBURSEMENT MISC TRAVEL PORT ANGELES POWER EQUIPMENT SHOTWELL CORP, JONATHAN SOUND PUBLISHING INC SPECTRA LABORATORIES-KITSAP SWAIN'S GENERAL STORE INC THURMAN SUPPLY USA BLUEBOOK UTILITIES UNDERGROUND LOC Description Account Number SALT (SODIUM CHLORIDE) 402-7380-534.31-05 TESTING&CALIBRATION SERVI MISC PROFESSIONAL SERVICE MISC PROFESSIONAL SERVICE TESTING&CALIBRATION SERVI SUPPLIES MATERIAL HNDLING&STOR EQP PAINTS, COATI NGS,WALLPAPER OPTICAL EQUIP ACESS& SUPP PROSTHETIC,HEARING AID ET Shipping Charges SEED,SOD,SOIL&INOCULANT MEAL REIMBURSMENT HART -MGT -342 DISASTER MGM MACHINERY & HEAVY HRDWARE BUILDING MAINT&REPAIR SER BUILDING MAINT&REPAIR SER BUILDING MAINT&REPAIR SER COMMUNICATIONS/MEDIA SERV TESTING&CALIBRATION SERVI FIRST AID & SAFETY EQUIP. NURSERY STOCK & SUPPLIES PIPE FITTINGS ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS PIPE FITTINGS MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES CTR Water Division Total: Public Works -Water Department Total: Water Utility Fund Total: ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCE ASSN NCL NORTH CENTRAL LABORATORIES ENVIRONMENTAL&ECOLOGICAL CHEMICAL LAB EQUIP & SUPP 402-7380-534.41-50 402-7380-534.33-10 402-7380-534.33-10 402-7380-534.41-50 402-7380-534.31-20 402-7380-534.31-01 402-7380-534.31-20 402-7380-534.31-01 402-7380-534.31-01 402-7380-534.42-10 402-7380-534.31-20 402-7380-534.31-01 402-7380-534.43-10 402-7380-534.31-01 402-7380-534.48-10 402-7380-534.48-10 402-7380-534.48-10 402-7380-534.41-15 402-7380-534.41-50 402-7380-534.31-01 402-7380-534.31-20 402-7380-534.31-20 402-7380-534.31-01 402-7380-534.31-20 402-7380-534.49-90 403-0000-237.00-00 403-0000-237.00-00 Amount 6,118.88 235.00 488.48 900.74 52.00 83.34 602.55 213.11 36.91 185.09 195.63 133.70 95.00 143.25 36.87 50.00 150.00 150.00 186.61 239.00 94.15 29.73 56.28 19.85 76.30 33.50 $11,328.94 $11,328.94 $11,281.00 (8.23) (77.48) Page 9 of 18 Jun 12, 2019 9:33:10 AM June 18, 2019 E-13 ,, r4 City of Port Angeles 5 IF i City Council Expenditure Report ,c,,,�,• Between May 25, 2019 and Jun 7, 2019 Vendor Division Total: Department Total: CONTRACT HARDWARE INC DEPT OF LABOR & INDUSTRIES ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCE ASSN FEDERAL EXPRESS CORP FERGUSON ENTERPRISES INC GRANICH ENGINEERED PRODUCTS INC KUBWATER RESOURCES, INC MISC TRAVEL NAPA AUTO PARTS NCL NORTH CENTRAL LABORATORIES O'REILLY AUTO PARTS PUD #1 OF CLALLAM COUNTY SWAIN'S GENERAL STORE INC THURMAN SUPPLY USA BLUEBOOK UTILITIES UNDERGROUND LOC Description HARDWARE,AND ALLIED ITEMS CONSULTING SERVICES ENVIRONMENTAL&ECOLOGICAL Account Number 403-7480-535.31-01 403-7480-535.49-90 403-7480-535.41-50 Shipping Charges 403-7480-535.42-10 PIPE FITTINGS 403-7480-535.31-20 PIPE AND TUBING 403-7480-535.31-20 BEARINGS (EXCEPT WHEEL) 403-7480-535.31-20 WATER&SEWER TREATING CHEM BOWEN-LSC DRY CLEANERS WK BOWEN-MUNICON 2019 CONF PLUMBING EQUIP FIXT,SUPP CHEMICAL LAB EQUIP & SUPP PLUMBING EQUIP FIXT,SUPP MISC PROFESSIONAL SERVICE PIPE FITTINGS SUPPLIES SUPPLIES PIPE AND TUBING PIPE FITTINGS CHEMICAL LAB EQUIP & SUPP PIPE FITTINGS MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES CTR Wastewater Division Total: Public Works-WW/Stormwtr Department Total: Wastewater Utility Fund Total: A/R MISCELLANEOUS REFUNDS OVERPMT OF TRFR STN FEES OVERPMT OF TRFR STN FEES OVERPMT TRANSFER STN FEES Division Total: Department Total: 403-7480-535.31-05 403-7480-535.43-10 403-7480-535.43-10 403-7480-535.31-20 403-7480-535.31-01 403-7480-535.35-01 403-7480-535.47-10 403-7480-535.31-20 403-7480-535.31-01 403-7480-535.31-01 403-7480-535.31-20 403-7480-535.31-20 403-7480-535.35-01 403-7480-535.35-01 403-7480-535.49-90 404-0000-213.10-90 404-0000-213.10-90 404-0000-213.10-90 Amount ($85.71) ($85.71) 748.73 281.93 102.75 284.72 15.14 124.05 1,875.08 3,987.64 42.00 125.00 3.25 968.05 1.45 236.12 2.76 398.81 173.63 9.12 2.80 914.96 148.58 33.49 $10,480.06 $10,480.06 $10,394.35 0.24 194.74 117.42 $312.40 $312.40 Page 10 of 18 Jun 12, 2019 9:33:10 AM June 18, 2019 E-14 i ,C,,,ff, City of Port Angeles City Council Expenditure Report Between May 25, 2019 and Jun 7, 2019 Vendor Description Account Number Amount ALL WEATHER HEATING & ENVIRONMENTAL&ECOLOGICAL 404-7538-537.48-10 1,878.34 COOLING MISC EMPLOYEE EXPENSE MEAL REIMBURSEMENT 404-7538-537.31-01 76.00 REIMBURSEMENT MEAL REIMBURSEMENT 404-7538-537.31-01 57.00 DRIVING ABSTRACT REIMB - 404-7538-537.49-90 13.00 SWAIN'S GENERAL STORE INC JANITORIAL SUPPLIES 404-7538-537.31-01 59.79 SUPPLIES 404-7538-537.31-01 45.16 SW - Transfer Station Division Total: $2,129.29 MISC EMPLOYEE EXPENSE MEAL REIMBURSEMENT 404-7580-537.31-01 38.00 REIMBURSEMENT MEAL REIMBURSMENT 404-7580-537.31-01 38.00 MEAL REIMBURSMENT 404-7580-537.31-01 19.00 MEAL REIMBURSMENT 404-7580-537.31-01 19.00 MEAL REIMBURSMENT 404-7580-537.31-01 19.00 MEAL REIMBURSMENT 404-7580-537.31-01 38.00 SWAIN'S GENERAL STORE INC SHOES AND BOOTS 404-7580-537.31-01 156.42 SHOES AND BOOTS 404-7580-537.31-01 230.34 Solid Waste -Collections Division Total: $557.76 THURMAN SUPPLY PIPE AND TUBING 404-7585-537.48-10 570.76 Solid Waste -Landfill Division Total: $570.76 Public Works -Solid Waste Department Total: $3,257.81 Solid Waste Utility Fund Total: $3,570.21 AIRPORT GARDEN CENTER NURSERY STOCK & SUPPLIES 406-7412-538.31-20 133.81 ANGELES MILLWORK & LUMBER PAINTS, COATI NGS,WALLPAPER 406-7412-538.35-01 10.38 BAXTER AUTO PARTS #15 AUTO SHOP EQUIPMENT & SUP 406-7412-538.31-01 43.87 CLALLAM CNTY DEPT OF HEALTH LAB EQUIP,BIO,CHEM,ENVIR 406-7412-538.41-50 2,560.00 LAB EQUIP,BIO,CHEM,ENVIR 406-7412-538.41-50 540.00 LAB EQUIP,BIO,CHEM,ENVIR 406-7412-538.41-50 660.00 LAB EQUIP,BIO,CHEM,ENVIR 406-7412-538.41-50 540.00 HEARTLINE NURSERY STOCK & SUPPLIES 406-7412-538.31-20 56.52 SWAIN'S GENERAL STORE INC LAWN MAINTENANCE EQUIP 406-7412-538.35-01 100.86 THURMAN SUPPLY PIPE FITTINGS 406-7412-538.31-20 16.14 UTILITIES UNDERGROUND LOC MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES 406-7412-538.49-90 33.50 CTR Stormwater Division Total: $4,695.08 Public Works-WW/Stormwtr Department Total: $4,695.08 Page 11 of 18 Jun 12, 2019 9:33:10 AM June 18, 2019 E-15 i ,C,,,ff, City of Port Angeles City Council Expenditure Report Between May 25, 2019 and Jun 7, 2019 Vendor Description Account Number Amount Stormwater Utility Fund Total: $4,695.08 LIFE ASSIST SALE SURPLUS/OBSOLETE 409-6025-526.31-02 669.81 REIFENSTAHL, PATRICIA FIRST AID & SAFETY EQUIP. 409-6025-526.31-08 400.00 SWAIN'S GENERAL STORE INC SUPPLIES 409-6025-526.20-80 48.92 CLOTHING & APPAREL 409-6025-526.20-80 86.85 CLOTHING & APPAREL 409-6025-526.20-80 147.58 WA STATE HEALTH CARE CY 2017 GEMT IGT 409-6025-526.41-50 69,125.10 AUTHORITY Medic I Division Total: $70,478.26 Fire Department Total: $70,478.26 Medic I Utility Fund Total: $70,478.26 FOSTER PEPPER PLLC MISC PROFESSIONAL SERVICE 413-7481-535.41-50 19,799.79 INTEGRAL CONSULTING, INC CONSULTING SERVICES 413-7481-535.41-50 15,041.19 Wastewater Remediation Division Total: $34,840.98 Public Works-WW/Stormwtr Department Total: $34,840.98 Harbor Clean Up Fund Total: $34,840.98 ALL WEATHER HEATING & CITY REBATE 421-7121-533.49-86 500.00 COOLING CITY REBATE 421-7121-533.49-86 500.00 MATHEWS GLASS CO INC CITY REBATE 421-7121-533.49-86 52.50 CITY REBATE 421-7121-533.49-86 26.58 CITY REBATE 421-7121-533.49-86 90.00 CITY REBATE 421-7121-533.49-86 157.50 MISC CITY CONSERVATION CITY REBATE 421-7121-533.49-86 94.44 REBATES CITY REBATE 421-7121-533.49-86 500.00 CITY REBATE 421-7121-533.49-86 500.00 PENINSULA HEAT INC CITY REBATE 421-7121-533.49-86 500.00 Conservation Division Total: $2,921.02 Public Works -Electric Department Total: $2,921.02 Conservation Fund Total: $2,921.02 AMAZON CAPITAL SERVICES AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-0000-141.40-00 74.81 ASSOCIATED PETROLEUM FUEL,OIL,GREASE, & LUBES 501-0000-141.20-00 5,227.67 PRODUCTS, INC FUEL,OIL,GREASE, & LUBES 501-0000-141.20-00 6,027.62 BAXTER AUTO PARTS #15 BELTS AND BELTING 501-0000-141.40-00 48.70 MASCO PETROLEUM, INC FUEL,OIL,GREASE, & LUBES 501-0000-141.20-00 462.83 MCMASTER-CARR SUPPLY CO AUTO & TRUCK ACCESSORIES 501-0000-141.40-00 116.92 Page 12 of 18 Jun 12, 2019 9:33:10 AM June 18, 2019 E-16 $w'-Iff, City of Port Angeles City Council Expenditure Report Between May 25, 2019 and Jun 7, 2019 Vendor Description Account Number Amount NAPA AUTO PARTS AUTO & TRUCK ACCESSORIES 501-0000-141.40-00 16.70 AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-0000-141.40-00 513.98 PAPE-KENWORTH NORTHWEST, AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-0000-141.40-00 80.17 INC PORT ANGELES TIRE FACTORY AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-0000-141.40-00 240.25 PRICE FORD LINCOLN AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-0000-141.40-00 75.58 QUALITY 4X4 TRUCK SUPPLY AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-0000-141.40-00 2.17 Division Total: $12,887.40 Department Total: $12,887.40 ARAMARK LAUNDRY/DRY CLEANING SERV 501-7630-548.49-90 125.99 ASSOCIATED PETROLEUM FUEL,OIL,GREASE, & LUBES 501-7630-548.32-13 236.12 PRODUCTS, INC FUEL,OIL,GREASE, & LUBES 501-7630-548.32-13 60.00 BAXTER AUTO PARTS #15 AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.34-02 53.70 AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.34-02 61.74 AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.34-02 64.95 FAR -WEST MACHINE & AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.34-02 35.61 HYDRAULICS FREIGHTLINER NORTHWEST AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.34-02 51.00 GRAINGER AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.34-02 925.97 AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.31-20 808.75 HEARTLINE AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.34-02 1,402.23 LES SCHWAB TIRE CENTER AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.34-02 114.52 AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.34-02 882.78 EXTERNAL LABOR SERVICES 501-7630-548.34-02 178.13 LINCOLN INDUSTRIAL CORP AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.34-02 17.16 AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.31-01 21.66 METALS, BARS, PLATES, RODS 501-7630-548.34-02 82.82 EXTERNAL LABOR SERVICES 501-7630-548.34-02 33.70 METALS, BARS, PLATES, RODS 501-7630-548.34-02 96.10 MATT'S TOOLS USA, LLC AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.35-01 23.15 AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.35-01 10.53 MCMASTER-CARR SUPPLY CO AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.31-01 130.44 N C MACHINERY CO AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.34-02 829.95 AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.34-02 124.08 NAPA AUTO PARTS AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.34-02 18.47 Page 13 of 18 Jun 12, 2019 9:33:10 AM June 18, 2019 E-17 $w'-Iff, City of Port Angeles City Council Expenditure Report Between May 25, 2019 and Jun 7, 2019 Vendor Description Account Number Amount NAPA AUTO PARTS AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.34-02 56.02 AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.49-90 (63.58) O'REILLY AUTO PARTS AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.34-02 73.87 AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.34-02 272.51 AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.34-02 (102.18) OFFICE DEPOT OFFICE SUPPLIES, GENERAL 501-7630-548.31-01 243.48 PACIFIC GOLF & TURF AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.34-02 455.75 PORT ANGELES AUTO GLASS AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.34-02 340.87 PORT ANGELES TIRE FACTORY EXTERNAL LABOR SERVICES 501-7630-548.34-02 18.42 EXTERNAL LABOR SERVICES 501-7630-548.34-02 18.42 EXTERNAL LABOR SERVICES 501-7630-548.34-02 73.70 EXTERNAL LABOR SERVICES 501-7630-548.34-02 18.42 EXTERNAL LABOR SERVICES 501-7630-548.34-02 73.70 AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.49-90 101.09 AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.34-02 179.16 EXTERNAL LABOR SERVICES 501-7630-548.34-02 73.70 RICHMOND 2 -WAY RADIO AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.34-02 26.09 AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.34-02 47.83 EXTERNAL LABOR SERVICES 501-7630-548.34-02 156.53 EXTERNAL LABOR SERVICES 501-7630-548.34-02 208.70 RUDDELL AUTO MALL AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.34-02 10.01 RUDY'S AUTOMOTIVE AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.34-02 442.68 EXTERNAL LABOR SERVICES 501-7630-548.34-02 522.97 WEST COAST WIRE, ROPE & AUTO & TRUCK MAINT. ITEMS 501-7630-548.34-02 441.10 RIGGING Equipment Services Division Total: $10,078.81 Public Works Department Total: $10,078.81 Equipment Services Fund Total: $22,966.21 CANON USA, INC OFFICE MACHINES & ACCESS 502-2081-518.45-31 3,928.28 CENTURYLINK-QWEST 05-10 A/C 360Z1 00240955B 502-2081-518.42-10 193.07 05-14 A/C 3604570411199B 502-2081-518.42-10 786.74 05-14 A/C 3604570831558B 502-2081-518.42-10 51.73 05-14 A/C 3604570968343B 502-2081-518.42-10 107.43 05-14 A/C 3604571270975B 502-2081-518.42-10 252.13 05-14 A/C 3604571535571 B 502-2081-518.42-10 105.42 Page 14 of 18 Jun 12, 2019 9:33:10 AM June 18, 2019 E-18 o,;., i w.Iff, City of Port Angeles City Council Expenditure Report Between May 25, 2019 and Jun 7, 2019 Vendor Description Account Number Amount CENTURYLINK-QWEST 05-14 A/C 3604574859247B 502-2081-518.42-10 107.06 05-14 A/C 3604575170121 B 502-2081-518.42-10 122.27 05-14 A/C 3604576315689B 502-2081-518.42-10 107.23 05-14 A/C 3604576684085B 502-2081-518.42-10 641.66 05-16 A/C 206T325585090B 502-2081-518.42-10 54.51 05-16 A/C 206T329544912B 502-2081-518.42-10 54.51 05-16 A/C 206T355724768B 502-2081-518.42-10 57.62 05-16 A/C 206T359336570B 502-2081-518.42-10 489.69 05-20 A/C 206T217227465B 502-2081-518.42-10 57.62 CONSOLIDATED TECH SERVICES COMMUNICATIONS/MEDIA SERV 502-2081-518.42-10 494.12 NEW HORIZONS COMPUTER LRNG DATA PROC SERV &SOFTWARE 502-2081-518.43-10 2,380.00 CTRS VERIZON WIRELESS 05-05 A/C 542276284-00001 502-2081-518.42-10 68.70 05-15 A/C 842160242-00003 502-2081-518.42-10 1,615.58 05-15 A/C 842160242-00004 502-2081-518.42-10 4,863.89 WAVE BROADBAND DATA PROC SERV &SOFTWARE 502-2081-518.42-12 14,015.60 Information Technologies Division Total: $30,554.86 PUD #1 OF CLALLAM COUNTY RADIO & TELECOMMUNICATION 502-2083-518.47-10 47.89 Wireless Mesh Division Total: $47.89 Finance Department Total: $30,602.75 Information Technology Fund Total: $30,602.75 HSA BANK HSA Service Fee 503-1631-517.41-50 272.50 NW ADMIN TRANSFER ACCT INSURANCE, ALL TYPES 503-1631-517.46-33 85,738.75 INSURANCE, ALL TYPES 503-1631-517.46-34 5,763.60 REDACTED Disability Board -May 503-1631-517.46-35 5.02 Disability Board -May 503-1631-517.46-35 5.69 Disability Board -May 503-1631-517.46-35 31.00 Disability Board -May 503-1631-517.46-35 67.83 Disability Board -May 503-1631-517.46-35 95.70 Disability Board -May 503-1631-517.46-35 261.41 Disability Board -May 503-1631-517.46-35 436.42 REIMBURSE MEDICARE -MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 (572.50) REIMBURSE MEDICARE -MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 (375.50) REIMBURSE MEDICARE -MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 (302.80) REIMBURSE MEDICARE -MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 (135.50) Page 15 of 18 Jun 12, 2019 9:33:10 AM June 18, 2019 E-19 ,, r4 i 5 IF,c,,,�,• City of Port Angeles City Council Expenditure Report Between May 25, 2019 and Jun 7, 2019 Vendor Description Account Number Amount REDACTED REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 (134.00) REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 (134.00) REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 (134.00) REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 (134.00) REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 (127.50) REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 (123.00) REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 (120.00) REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 (118.50) REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 (113.00) REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 (109.00) REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 (108.00) REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 (108.00) REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 (108.00) REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 (108.00) REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 108.00 REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 108.00 REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 108.00 REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 108.00 REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 109.00 REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 113.00 REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 118.50 REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 120.00 REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 123.00 REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 127.50 REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 134.00 REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 134.00 REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 134.00 REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 134.00 REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 135.50 REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 270.90 REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 302.80 REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 375.50 REIMBURSE MEDICARE-MAY 503-1631-517.46-35 572.50 Other Insurance Programs Division Total: $92,948.82 Page 16 of 18 Jun 12, 2019 9:33:10 AM June 18, 2019 E - 20 Page 17 of 18 Jun 12, 2019 9:33:10 AM June 18, 2019 E - 21 City of Port Angeles City Council Expenditure Report Between May 25, 2019 and Jun 7, 2019 Vendor Description Account Number Amount DEPT OF LABOR & INDUSTRIES 2019 1ST QTR SELF INSURAN 503-1661-517.49-50 41.43 Worker's Compensation Division Total: $41.43 Self Insurance Department Total: $92,990.25 Self -Insurance Fund Total: $92,990.25 REDACTED Disability Board -May 602-6221-517.46-35 859.75 Disability Board -May 602-6221-517.46-35 15,959.14 REIMBURSE MEDICARE -MAY 602-6221-517.46-35 (127.00) REIMBURSE MEDICARE -MAY 602-6221-517.46-35 (122.50) REIMBURSE MEDICARE -MAY 602-6221-517.46-35 122.50 REIMBURSE MEDICARE -MAY 602-6221-517.46-35 127.00 Fireman's Pension Division Total: $16,818.89 Fireman's Pension Department Total: $16,818.89 Firemen's Pension Fund Total: $16,818.89 AFLAC SUPPLEMENTAL INSURANCE 920-0000-231.53-10 1,686.50 PAYROLL SUMMARY 920-0000-231.53-11 192.31 PAYROLL SUMMARY 920-0000-231.53-12 836.16 CHAPTER 13 TRUSTEE Case #14-14948 920-0000-231.56-90 904.16 EMPLOYEES ASSOCIATION PAYROLL SUMMARY 920-0000-231.55-30 560.00 EMPOWER-P/R WIRE PAYROLL SUMMARY 920-0000-231.52-20 18,328.72 FEDERAL PAYROLL TAX PAYROLL SUMMARY 920-0000-231.50-10 72,526.47 FICA/MEDICARE PAYROLL TAX PAYROLL SUMMARY 920-0000-231.50-20 81,026.74 HSA BANK Employee Contr to HSA 920-0000-231.52-40 4,056.46 Employee Contr to HSA 920-0000-231.52-40 4,131.46 ICMA-P/R WIRES PAYROLL SUMMARY 920-0000-231.52-10 18,522.39 JOHN HANCOCK LIFE INSURANCE PAYROLL SUMMARY 920-0000-231.52-25 3,318.95 CO LEOFF PAYROLL SUMMARY 920-0000-231.51-21 28,136.30 OFFICE OF SUPPORT PAYROLL SUMMARY 920-0000-231.56-20 138.46 ENFORCEMENT PERS PAYROLL SUMMARY 920-0000-231.51-10 1,249.16 PAYROLL SUMMARY 920-0000-231.51-11 13,363.32 PAYROLL SUMMARY 920-0000-231.51-12 78,537.32 TEAMSTERS LOCAL 589 PAYROLL SUMMARY 920-0000-231.54-10 1,877.00 PAYROLL SUMMARY 920-0000-231.54-10 1,924.00 UNITED WAY (PAYROLL) PAYROLL SUMMARY 920-0000-231.56-10 262.54 Page 17 of 18 Jun 12, 2019 9:33:10 AM June 18, 2019 E - 21 City of Port Angeles i City Council Expenditure Report ,C,,,K, Between May 25, 2019 and Jun 7, 2019 Vendor Description Account Number Amount VOLUNTEER FIRE ASSOCIATION PAYROLL SUMMARY 920-0000-231.55-20 2.00 WSCCCE AFSCME AFL-CIO PAYROLL SUMMARY 920-0000-231.54-40 232.48 WSCFF/EMPLOYEE BENEFIT PAYROLL SUMMARY 920-0000-231.53-20 1,725.00 TRUST Division Total: $333,537.90 Department Total: $333,537.90 Payroll Clearing Fund Total: $333,537.90 Total for Checks Dated Between May 25, 2019 and Jun 7, 2019 $808,626.95 Page 18 of 18 Jun 12, 2019 9:33:10 AM June 18, 2019 E - 22 P-Q-R-TANGELES CITY COUNCIL WASH I N G T O N, U.S. MEMO Date: June 18, 2019 To: City Council From: Nathan West, City Manager Sarina Carrizosa, Finance Director Subject: The 2020-2025 Capital Facility Plan and Transportation Plan Summary: The Capital Facilities Plan and Transportation Improvement Plan (CFP/TIP) are required components of the City's Comprehensive Plan. The plans allows the City to plan for asset management proactively and maximize our limited resources. Additionally, including projects in the CFP/TIP allows the City to leverage outside funding sources. Funding: No funding is required at this time. Recommendation: Staff requests that Council: 1) Continue the second public hearing on the 2020-2025 Capital Facilities Plan and Transportation Improvement Plan. 2) Close the public hearing. 3) Conduct the second reading of the 2020 -2025 Capital Facilities Plan and Transportation Improvement Plan resolution and adopt the Resolution. Background / Analysis: The Washington State Growth Management Act requires that the City review and update the Capital Facilities Plan and Transportation Improvement Plan annually. The CFP is a six year planning document that is based on needs and policies identified in the City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan. It represents Port Angeles' current list of needed projects and programs for the next six years. The document also identifies secured or reasonably expected revenues and expenditures for each of the projects included in the CFP. Projects without identified funding are also listed in the CFP/TIP to allow for additional funding options to be explored. These projects are grouped into the following project types: • General Government o Public Safety o Parks and Recreation • Utilities: o Electric o Water o Wastewater o Solid Waste o Stormwater o Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) • Information Technologies • Equipment Services • Transportation o Transportation Benefit District June 18, 2019 F-1 The CFP/TIP is required to be filed with the State of Washington by June 30r' of each year in order to be eligible for certain grant opportunities for transportation projects. The 2020-2025 Capital Facilities Plan and Transportation Improvement Plan (CFP) allows citizens, advisory boards and City Council to critically review and identify priority projects as well as items that require long-term planning. This comprehensive approach allows consideration and approval of capital improvements/replacements for a longer range than an annual review and coordinates the decision making process to include all available information and resources. Projects in the CFP have been vetted by City staff and management, and the Utility Advisory Committee has forwarded a favorable recommendation on the utility projects. In addition, on May 28' Council held a work session to discuss the CFP/TIP. In all instances Council's directives have been considered and implemented: 1) Replacement of critical infrastructure based on priorities with a focus on preventable maintenance to increase asset life. 2) Leverages projects by building multiple projects in one area at the same time to save on construction costs. 3) Best use of funds available to limit the impact on customer rates from capital investment. 4) No new debt is required to complete projects or is planned for future projects. 5) Building capital reserves to a cash to depreciation ratio of 1:1. ■ General Government and Transportation currently are below this threshold but have improved since last year. A list of all active and prioritized projects is attached to this memo. Unfunded projects are described in the CFP/TIP document, but they are not included in the exhibit. The complete document can be reviewed in detail in the Preliminary CFP/TIP document posted on the City's website. At the work session on May 28' City Council recommended including all AIA projects that are in the City's Comprehensive Plan. As a result two projects, GG0319 — Peabody Creek Daylight and TR0719 — First/Front Decoupling, have been added to CFP/TIP in the unfunded section. Additionally, at the June 4' Council meeting, after the first public hearing on the CFP/TIP, Council requested staff to present details regarding project TR0113 — Waterfront Redevelopment Project, TRO818 — Railroad Avenue Arterial, GG0219 — Downtown Improvement Plan as well as any relevant City Pier projects. Staff will present these details at tonight's meeting. As a reminder please note that projects that move to an "Active" status are those that are currently funded and under construction, "Prioritized" projects will be funded within the CFP's 6 year period and "Unfunded" projects do not have any funding source. In order for a project to change in status both staff time and funding must be identified. These can be accomplished by Council reprioritizing and reallocating funding to a project deemed a higher priority than another, or Council can reprioritize staff time to identify funding for a certain unfunded project before other unfunded projects are explored. In conclusion, the CFP/TIP is a living document and is subject to change due to shifting priorities, emergencies and other factors. As amendments are presented to Council by staff an analysis will be performed to ensure rates are not impacted negatively and both funding and staff time is available. Funding Overview: No funding is required at this time. June 18, 2019 F - 2 2020 - 2025 Capital Facilities Plan Transportation Improvement Plan Exhibit CAPITAL FACILITIES PIAN Number �,................ WATER r Y CAPITAL FACILITIES PLAN ,..,,..,„. CTRICPROJECTS PRIORITY TOTAL PROJECT BUDGET 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 Number TiIf 2019 WT0118 Ranney Well Roof GENERAL GOVERNMENT/FACILITIES 90,333 90,000 - - - - - - CLO218 Leasehold Improvements A GGO3O3 NICE Program R 732,100 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 GG1113 Facility Security Projects 2 184,268 60,000 31,000 75,000 - - - - GG0416 City Hall Fire Detection System 3 75,000 75,000 - - - - - - GG0516 Senior Center Fire Detection System 4 50,000 - 50,000 - - - - - PUBLIC SAFETY - - - CL0119 Overhead Reconductoring-2020 2 200,000 - 200,000 - - CAPPC Pencom Capital R 555,475 53,300 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 PDO116 Mobile Data Terminal Replacements A 140,467 21,000 25,000 28,000 - - - - PD0119 Computer Aided Dispatch, Law Enforcement records ma 1 300,000 50,000 250,000 - - - - - FD0415 Fire Dept Turn -Out Gear R 160,316 - - - - - - - FD0615 Fire Hoses R 40,643 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 FDO118 Defibrillator Revolving Account R 216,883 35,000 35,000 36,000 37,000 - - 40,000 FDO218 Self Contained Breathing App. R - - - - - - - - FD0318 Emergency Management Pods 5 150,000 - 50,000 50,000 - 50,000 - - FD0315 Fire Station Garage Door 6 50,000 - 50,000 - - - - - PARKS AND RECREATION - - CL0202 Feeder Tie Hwy 1O1, Porter to Golf Course Road 13 260,000 - - - 260,000 - PKO216 Facility Improvement Revolving Fund R 105,000 15,000 15,000 15,000 15,000 15,000 15,000 15,000 PKO2O5 Restroom Replacement Program R 600,000 75,000 75,000 75,000 75,000 75,000 75,000 75,000 PKO418 Civic Field Upgrades A 98,676 75,000 - - - - - - PK0219 Generation II Dream Playground 7 425,000 200,000 225,000 - - - - - PK0619 Downtown Tree Replacement -Phase III 8 100,000 - - 100,000 - - - - PK0719 Parks Maintenance Building 9 500,000 50,000 450,000 TOTALS 4,483,828 764,300 1,011,000 984,000 282,000 295,000 245,000 285,000 CAPITAL FACILITIES PIAN Number �,................ WATER r Y CAPITAL FACILITIES PLAN ,..,,..,„. CTRICPROJECTS PRIORITY TOTAL PROJECT BUDGET 2020 21 2022 2023 2024 2025 Number TiIf 2019 WT0118 Ranney Well Roof ELECTRIC 90,333 90,000 - - - - - - CLO218 Leasehold Improvements A 143,396 65,800 - - - - - - CL0414 Construct New Light Ops Building A 6,400,000 400,000 6,000,000 - - - - - CL0916 Replace Laurel St Substation Switchgear A 500,000 500,000 - - - - - - CL0219 Underground Cable Replacement -2019 A 200,000 200,000 - - - - - - CL0716 "F" Street Substation Transformer and Switchgear 1 1,500,000 - 1,500,000 - - - - - CL0119 Overhead Reconductoring-2020 2 200,000 - 200,000 - - - - - CL0319 Underground Cable Replacement -2020 3 200,000 - 200,000 - - - - - CL0217 I Street Substation Switchgear 4 500,000 - - 500,000 - - - - CL0919 Replace "A" Street Substation Breaker 5 500,000 - - 500,000 - - - - CL0419 Underground Cable Replacement -2021 6 200,000 - - 200,000 - - - - CLO 519 Underground Cable Replacement -2022 7 200,000 - - - 200,000 - - - CL0117 Washington Street Substation SwitchGear 8 500,000 - - - - 500,000 - - CL0819 Overhead Reconductoring-2023 9 200,000 - - - - 200,000 - - CL0619Underground Cable Replacement -2023 10 200,000 - - - - 200,000 - - CL0719 Underground Cable Replacement -2024 11 200,000 - - - - - 200,000 - CL0216 City / PUD Service Area Capital Needs 12 400,000 - 200,000 200,000 - - - - CL0202 Feeder Tie Hwy 1O1, Porter to Golf Course Road 13 260,000 - - - 260,000 - - - CL0313 Pole Replacement Program 14 1,300,000 - 650,000 - - 650,000 - - CL1019 Underground Cable Replacement - 2 02 5 15 200,000 - CAPWT General WaterE ui ment 10 469,239 59,500 200,000 TOTALS 14 13,803,396 1,165,800 8,750,000 1,400,000 460,000 1,550,000 200,000 200,000 CAPITAL FACILITIES PIAN Number �,................ WATER r Y TOTAL PROJECT BUDGET 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 WATER WT0118 Ranney Well Roof A 90,333 90,000 - - - - - - WT0215 Marine Or Channel Water Main Crossing Replacement A 83,075 27,450 - - - - - - WT0218 Reservoir Repairs A 175,000 175,000 - - - - - - WT0419 Decant Facility at Transfer Station- Water Soils Decant B A 150,000 25,000 125,000 - - - - - WT0512East 4th Street Water Main A 405,000 50,000 355,000 - - - - - WT0518 10th Street Water Main "I to N" A 319,966 40,000 - - - - - - WT0612 3rd Street and Vine Street Main A 361,000 50,000 311,000 - - - - - WT0319 Ground Water Test Wells 1 600,000 - 150,000 250,000 200,000 - - - WT0212 East 6th Street Water Main 2 368,200 - 57,200 311,000 - - - - WT0519 Water Treatment Plant Repairs 3 170,000 - 170,000 - - - - - WT0412 West 4th Street Water Main 4 1,239,400 - - - - 202,400 1,037,000 - WT0111 Liberty Street Water Main 5 455,609 5,000 - - 48,000 390,000 - - WT0717 Rare/Caroline Street Fire Flow 6 760,000 - - - - - 120,000 - WT0219 Peabody Heights Floating Cover Replacement 7 400,000 - - - - - 200,000 200,000 WTO112 10th Street Water Main 8 1,081,000 - - - - - - 176,000 WTO619 Peabody Reservoirinlet Pipe Replacement 9 230,000 - 230,000 - - - - - CAPWT General WaterE ui ment 10 469,239 59,500 1 50,000 1 50,000 1 50,000 1 50,000 1 50,000 50,000 I I TOTALS 'fly°' I 1 7,357,822 1 521,950 1 1,448,200 1 611,000 1 298,000 1 642,400 1 1,407,000 1 426,000 1 June 18, 2019 F - 3 2020 - 2025 Capital Facilities Plan Transportation Improvement Plan Exhibit PLAN PRIORITY TOTAL PROJECT BUDGET 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 WASTEWATER 2024 2025 Number Tide PRIORITY TOTAL PROJECT 2019 2020 2021 2022 WWO205 Biosolids Dewatering and Reuse A 1,462,926 50,000 - - - - - - W W0308 Pump Station #3 Replacement A 1,042,358 810,000 200,000 - - - - - W W0315 Marine Channel Bridge Sewer Crossing A 89,900 89,900 - - - - - - WW0618 2019 Neighborhood Sewer Rehab A 300,000 300,000 - - - - - - WW0815 Laurel Street Sewer Separation A 275,000 25,000 250,000 - - - - - WW0715 Oak Street Sewer Separation A 275,000 25,000 250,000 - - - - - W W1218 10th Street Sewer Main A 23,000 3,165 - - - - - - WW0519 Decant Facility at Transfer Station- Wastewater Soils De A 150,000 25,000 125,000 - - - - - WWO419 WWTP HVAC Replacement 1 200,000 50,000 150,000 - - - - - WW0219 WWTP Digester Cleaning and Repair 2 100,000 - 100,000 - - - - - WW0508 Digester Mixing Improvement WWTP 3 600,000 - 50,000 150,000 400,000 - - - WW0319 Wastewater Comprehensive Plan 4 300,000 - 200,000 100,000 - - - - WW0718 2020 Neighborhood Sewer Rehab 5 300,000 - 300,000 - - - - - WW0818 2021 Neighborhood Sewer Rehab 6 300,000 - - 300,000 - - - WW0918 2022 Neighborhood Sewer Rehab 7 300,000 - - - 300,000 - - WW0516 WWTP Boiler Replacement 8 115,000 - - - 45,000 70,000 - - WW1018 2023 Neighborhood Sewer Rehab 9 300,000 - 300,000 - - WW1118 2024 Neighborhood Sewer Rehab 10 300,000 - 300,000 - CAPWW General Wastewater Equipment 11 1 586,835 84,000 .1 000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 TOTALS $ 7 020 019 $1462 065 $1675 000 $ 600 000 $ 795 000 $ 420 000 $ 350 000 $ 50 000 June 18, 2019 F-4 CAPITAL FACILITIES PLAN CSO PROJECTS BUDGET BUDGET 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 Number Tide PRIORITY TOTAL PROJECT 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOW Finance - - - 33,122 - WW0316 CSO6 and 7 Reconstruction SW 112 208,449 - - - 15,000 150,000 - - WW0117 Francis Street Pi 'n B ass - 190,000 Landfill Operating Software 190,000 80,000 80,000 - - - TOTALS - 398,441 SW(0)217 190'( A 15,( 150,( - - June 18, 2019 F-4 CAPITAL FACILITIES PLAN SOLID WASTE PROJECTS BUDGET BUDGET 2019 Number Title PRIORITY TOTAL PROJECT 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 SOLID WASTE Finance - - - 33,122 - DR0213 "H" Street Stormwater Outfall SW 112 Decant Facility at Transfer Station A 637,354 155,000 457,300 - - - - - SW0117 Landfill Operating Software A 80,000 80,000 - - - - - 370,000 SW(0)217 Landfill Flare Re lacement A 204,789 156,000 - - DR0404 Canyon Edge &Ahlvers Stormwater 1 1,045,000 - 120,000 TOTALS - 922,143 391,000 457,300 DR0117 Peabody Creek Water Quality Project 2 620,000 - - June 18, 2019 F-4 CAPITAL FACILITIES PLAN STORMWATER PROJECTS BUDGET BUDGET 2019 Number Title PRIORITY TOTAL PROJECT 20192020 2024 2021 2022 2023 2024 202�;i. STORMWATER Finance - - - 33,122 - DR0213 "H" Street Stormwater Outfall A 514,463 10,000 500,000 - - - - - DR0215 Francis Street Outfall Repair A 35,000 35,000 - - - - - - DR0118 10th Street Catchbasins A 370,000 42,565 - - - - - - DR0404 Canyon Edge &Ahlvers Stormwater 1 1,045,000 - 120,000 925,000 - - - - DR0117 Peabody Creek Water Quality Project 2 620,000 - - 20,000 600,000 - - - DR0115 Liberty Street Stormwater Improvement 3 1,135,000 - - - 135,000 1,000,000 - - DR0119 N Street Outfall Improvement 4 250,000 - - - - 70,000 180,000 - DR0304 LaurelStreet and US 101 Stormwater 5 575,000 - - - - - 75,000 500,000 DR0219 Outfall to Creek Improvement Program 6 140,000 - - - - - 40,000 100,000 DR0804 Lincoln Park/Big Boy Pond S[ud 7 100,000 68,200 276,000 - 75,700 100, InformationServices - TOTALS - - 87 565 6200 0 0 945 0 00 73 5 000 1 170 000 295 000 600000 000 June 18, 2019 F-4 CAPITAL FACILITIES PLAN DEPARTMENT BUDGET 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 EQUIPMENT SERVICES Finance - - - 33,122 - 34,461 Community Development - - - - - - - Police 151,200 154,500 157,500 160,500 163,800 167,100 227,200 Fire & Medic 1 239,215 47,200 - 54,600 694,500 273,700 - Parks & Recreation 91,000 - 80,100 30,800 92,900 42,500 90,800 Engineering - - - - - 59,800 46,900 Light Ops 328,427 - 43,300 63,500 76,000 57,400 122,700 Water 42,600 212,200 39,000 - 140,800 41,400 - Wastewater 62,400 - - - 31,500 - 36,900 Solid Waste 45,800 407,500 - 427,300 - 398,600 24,500 Stormwater - 23,200 - - - - - Conservation - - - - - - - Equipment Services 24,073 - 68,200 276,000 - 75,700 281,700 InformationServices - - - - - - - Streets 156,100 419,200 254,400 27,600 195,500 401,300 1 140 815 1 263 800 642 500 1 073 422 1 199 500 1 346 161 1 232109 June 18, 2019 F-4 2020 - 2025 Capital Facilities Plan Transportation Improvement Plan Exhibit PROJECT EXPENDITURE LISTING BY YEAR INFORMATION SERVICES RANK PROJECT Budge, 2021 CAPITAL FACILITIES 2022 CAPITAL FACILITIES PLAN 2024 2025 NaQ20 021 2023 2024 2025 INFORMATION SERVICES IT0317 Phone System 911 Interface A 42,820 5,000 - - - - - - IT0918 Internal Network Segmentation & VLAN Configuration A 220,977 130,000 - - - - - - IT0218 Click2Gov3 / Fusion A 14,885 5,000 - - - - - - IT0217 SCADA Server Replacements A 75,000 75,000 - - - - - - IT0816 Facility and Class Management Scheduling A 10,000 10,000 - - - - - - IT0214 Records Management System A 247,035 - - 30,000 - 30,000 - 30,000 IT0618 Virtual Server Replacements -EXSI 1 450,000 - - 150,000 - 150,000 - 150,000 IT0714 Data Backup Systems Replacement 2 210,000 - 210,000 - - - - - IT0716 ERP Road Map 3 50,000 - 50,000 - - - - - IT0514 Data Storage Array Systems 4 150,000 - - 150,000 - - - - IT0119 Wireless Bridge 5 60,000 - 60,000 - - - - - IT0319 NETWORK Refresh 6 280,000 - - - - - 280,000 - IT0219 City Hall Wireless Network 7 21,000 - 21,000 - - - - - IT1018 UPS Replacement- Disaster Recovery DataCenter 8 60,000 - 60,000 - - - - - IT0416 Cemetery Software 9 30,000 - 30,000 - - - - - IT1118 IT Security Audit 11 20,000 - 20,000 - - - - TOTAL EXPENDI111111111�° - - 300,000 - - 180,0001 280,0001 180,000 TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS Numbe. Title RANK PROJECT TOTAL Budget 2019 2020 2021 CAPITAL FACILITIES 2022 PLAN 2023 2024 2025 TRANSPORTATION BENEFIT DISTRICT PROJECTS TR1118 Revolving Street improvements R 180,000 30,000 30,000 30,000 30,000 30,000 30,000 - TR0405 Alley Paving Revolving Funding R 875,000 125,000 125,000 125,000 125,000 125,000 125,000 125,000 TR1100 10th Street Reconstruction A 2,000,000 444,016 - - - - - - TRO515 Lauridsen Blvd Overlay A 1,030,800 1,030,800 - - - - - - TR0414 Peabody Creek/Lincoln St Culvert Repair 1 3,446,300 446,300 - - 3,000,000 - - - TR1299 Park Avenue Chip Seal 2 130,000 130,000 - - - - - - TR1516 Peabody Street Chip Seal Phi 4 125,000 - 125,000 - - - - - TR0215 Peabody Street Chip Seal Ph3 5 125,000 - 125,000 - - - - - TR0315 Peabody Street Chip Seal Ph2 6 200,000 - 200,000 - - - - - TR0615 Golf Course Road Chip Seal 7 200,000 - - 200,000 - - - - TR0218 Lincoln Street Safety 8 1,485,000 135,000 100,000 1,250,000 - - - - TR1416 Hamilton School Walking Routes 9 215,000 15,000 - - 200,000 - - - TR0616 ADA -Francis Street 10 300,000 - - - 300,000 - - - TR0618 Stevens Middle School Walking Routes 17 650,000 - - - - 50,000 600,000 - TRO115 N Street (5th to 15th) - Chip Seal 18 300,000 - - - 300,000 - - - TRO518 I Street (5th to 16th) Chipseal 19 300,000 - - - - 300,000 - - TR0316 8th Street (A to I) Chip Seal 20 300,000 - - - 300,000 - - - TR0219 5th Street Chip Seal - A to M Street 21 300,000 - - - - 300,000 - - TR0417 Ennis Street Pavement Repair 23 70,000 - - - 70,000 - - - TRO117 Liberty Street Reconstruction 24 460,000 - - - 10,000 450,000 - - TR0915 Park Avenue Paving Overlay 25 390,000 - - - - - 15,000 375,000 TR1116 School Area Speed Signs (Near Franklin) 26 50,000 - - - - 50,000 - - TR0716 ADA -Peabody Street 28 310,000 - - - - 10,000 300,000 - TRO119 8th Street Paving - Lincoln to A 29 900,000 - - - - - - 900,000 TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS TRO111 Marine Drive Channel Bridge A 644,727 319,840 - - - - - - TRO114 Hill Street -Olympic Discovery Trail A 1,648,165 46,000 - 1,421,700 - - - - TR0209 Race Complete Street A 3,564,954 189,800 115,000 3,000,000 - - - - TR0909 Wayfinding & DDT Signage A 212,013 211,500 - - - - - - TR1216 5th and Liberty Solar Speed Display A 50,000 50,000 - - - - - - TRO519 Peabody St Sidewalk Repair 3 95,000 95,000 - - - - - - TR0715 16th Street LID If Street to L Street) 11 1,060,000 160,000 - 900,000 - - - - TR0416 1St/2nd/Valley/Oak Green Alley 12 472,216 - - 450,000 - - - - TR1215 City Hall East Parking Lot LID 13 602,000 102,000 - - 500,000 - - - TRO517 6th/7th Alley (Francis to Washington) 14 200,000 - 200,000 - - - - - TRO101 Laurel Street Stairs Replacement 15 410,000 - 35,000 375,000 - - - - TR0418 Front St Alleys 16 250,000 - - 250,000 - - - - TR0318 8th/10th Street Bike Lanes 22 400,000 - - 20,000 380,000 - - - TR0319 Albert Street AlleV 4th5th 27 135,000 10,000 125,000 24,086,174 3,530,256 1,055,000 8,021,700 5,215,000 1,325,000 1,195,000 1,400,000 Ke R Revolving fund A Active tt Priority assigned number OF Unfunded June 18, 2019 F-5 RESOLUTION NO. A RESOLUTION of the City Council of the City of Port Angeles, Washington, adopting the City's Capital Facilities Plan for 2020 — 2025, which includes the City's Transportation Improvement Program for the years 2020-2025. WHEREAS, the City of Port Angeles is required to annually update its Capital Facilities Plan (CFP) and its Transportation Improvement Program (TIP); and WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Port Angeles, Washington being the legislative body of said City, on the 4th day of June 2019 and the 18th day of June 2019, did hold public hearings on the update of its CFP and TIP; and WHEREAS, the proposed CFP and TIP for 2020-2025 are consistent with the City's Comprehensive Plan; and WHEREAS, the City Council finds and declares that the CFP, including the TIP, is appropriate to address the capital and transportation planning needs of the City for 2020-2025. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the City Council of the City of Port Angeles, Washington, that the City's 2020 — 2025 CFP, which includes the City's TIP, as published May 8, 2019 in a document filed with the City Clerk as the "2020-2025 Preliminary Capital Facilities Plan and Transportation Improvement Plan for the City", as amended, with the addition of two projects -- GG0319, Peabody Creek Daylight and TR0719, First/Front Decoupling- - is hereby adopted. PASSED by the City Council of the City of Port Angeles at a regular meeting of said Council held on the 18th day of June 2019. Sissi Bruch, Mayor ATTEST: June 18, 2019 F-6 Kari Martinez -Bailey, City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: William E. Bloor, City Attorney June 18, 2019 F - 7 BACKGROUND June 4th Council requested a presentation on CFP Items: Waterfront Redevelopment TRO I-13 Railroad Avenue Paving TR08-18 Downtown Plan TR 02-19 City Pier Project PK 0319 All currently inactive projects are unfunded. No Funding has been committed No resources have been committed WATERFRONT REDEVELOPMENT -TRO 113 # I issue is capacity we have made active those WTI P projects for which funding has been made available Customs and Immigration pre -Clearance Cost of roadway improvements Pending Construction/Timing of Projects Unknown 11111111111 LEKT Hotel Landing Mail Renovations Red Lion Renovations Blackball Terminal Other Railroad Avenue Businesses 1111111111111 NOAA/Feiro New Home 3 Z911wagdo WATERFRONT REDEVELOPMENT -TRO 113 4 Z.I�Ilwm WATERFRONT REDEVELOPMENT -TRO 1 13 WEST Bf,�, FARK, EAST WEST ENPMK AEST H7) 11 711 UIR To I I Tka- w 00 m2l, LANDN'.' �0 UTf NER BOAR'DINALK AvEwE RALRO A RALl','ON.) NVENUE RALROAD AvENUE FAR, WEST WEST, FM E16T HIlLY6000 'KACH EXPANSPN s hit H'DLLYW00[/" F[AJA/ PAR -INC N mktqb-qlo Wdj WATERFRONT REDEVELOPMENT -TRO 1 13 A. Light Touch This scenario addresses the least -cost approach to upgrading the appearance and function of City Pier. It proposes to fix the metal railing, improve landscaping in the parking area and on the pier, renovating the existing Feiro building, and include cultural heritage elements in Hollywood Beach. It assumes that funds will be scarce and minimal, suggesting that improvements will be made only as opportunity presents. Updated activities would include: Play facility remodel WATERFRONT REDEVELOPMENT -TRO 113 2015- BIG TER 11 Grant- $280,000 (75%/25%) Lowest Bid- $194,365 Purchase Additional Float City Pier Assessment- Sargent Engineering WATERFRONT REDEVELOPMENT -TRO 113 iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiillillillillillillilliillillillillillillilliilillillilillillillilillilI IIIII Load Rating & Overall Assessment Piling Repairs- $600-700K City Pier Railing- $165K (Materials) &NNINW�.44 RAILROAD AVENUE OVERLAY -T!10818 $200,000 Paving Overlay Recognizes that Waterfront Redevelopment may be years away Ultimately paving will need to be removed Competes with other roadway projects 5 year temporary fix Requires reconstruction of ADA access points ARTERIAL STREET STANDARD Requirements must be met to make a roadway an arterial. There are three levels of arterial street PAMC Minor Arterial - Minimum average daily traffic count of 2,500 IN1111,1111WA DOWNTOWN IMPROVEMENT PLAN -000219 ' 1 Previously CL0318 item and specific to a construction project involving downtown lighting Initial project emerged after hearing concerns over the darkness of downtown (for pedestrian safety, etc). Never funded Last year reworked to include a subarea/neighborhood DOWNTOWN IMPROVEMENT PLAN-GG0219 Washington Growth Management Act (GMA) lays out mandatory and optional elements of a comprehensive plan Optional element includes subarea plans (neighborhoods, rural villages, U GAs, tribal areas, etc) The Downtown Improvement Plan would be a specific subarea plan of the downtown neighborhood Goals of the planning effort would be community driven (property and business owners, residents) Plan would typically lay out short and long term tasks for implementation bNb.l�low.Ai ALTERNATIVES FOR COUNCIL CONSIDERATION wllrllllr VIII ' .. ..VIII , ' 4 ' VIII IIIb Consider delaying Race Street Project Consider delaying ODT Hill Street Priority Reprioritize Waterfront Redevelopment Make Active PK03-19 —2019/2020 (railing install) Council could choose to move forward with overlay — staff would analyze CFP to postpone or make inactive other projects ON I I W, A A OTHER PROJECTS BROUGHT FORWARD 14 DURING THE FIRST PUBLIC HEARING A As a result of the items brought forward by citizens during the public comment period on June 41" the following projects will be added or included in the CFP. These projects are currently unfunded. TR0819 - Mount Angeles and Porter Road IN6.1�llwA RECOMMENDATION The Chamber of Commerce has offered to assist moving these projects forward: With the Chamber's assistance the City could be better informed on timeframe and status of private sector projects Available resources and timing information on area projects could enable reprioritization of either TRO 1-13 or TR08-18 RECOMMENDATION The Chamber of Commerce should work with the Port Angeles Downtown Association to approach businesses to determine: How businesses feel about making Railroad Avenue an arterial road. Estimated timeframes for construction and development. What the utility needs of these businesses are to avoid utility cuts or impact to roadway from abutting projects 16 &Z"1101 W�n QUESTIONS & DISCUSSION -%; 2 � P ORTANGELES CITY COUNCIL WASH I N G T o N, u. s. MEMO Date: June 18, 2019 To: City Council From: David Wechner, Interim Planning Manager, Community and Economic Development Subject: 2019 Amendment to the Comprehensive Plan Summary: In response to City Council direction to remove internal inconsistences, eliminate redundancies, and evaluate the definition of policy, CED staff and the Planning Commission reviewed the Comprehensive Plan and drafted amendments as a part of the City's 2019 annual amendment cycle, including those proposed in 2018. Public Hearings for these amendments are scheduled before City Council on June 4' and June 18' in order to provide a time to adopt the Plan document prior to the Washington State Department of Commerce deadline of June 30, 2019. Findings of the Council and clean copy of the finished Plan document and Appendices are provided as an exhibit to the proposed ordinance. Funding: N/A Recommendation: Adopt the ordinance approving the 2019 Comprehensive Plan Amendment as recommended by the Planning Commission. Background / Analysis: During the June 5, 2018 public hearing for the 2018 Comprehensive Plan Amendment, City Council passed a motion to ask the Planning Commission to take up the Comprehensive Plan Amendment with sufficient time for substantive review and discussion, and to request a timeline from City staff for the Planning Commission and Council review that meets the June 2019 deadline. A second motion resolved to declare that the current Comprehensive Plan satisfies State Growth Management Act requirements. The 2018 Amendment involved the integration of the 2009 American Institute of Architects (AIA) Sustainable Design Assessment Team (SDAT) Study into the Plan's vision, improved accuracy, fixed errors, and reviewed the plan's policies to ensure the City's vision is clear, prioritized, and can be implemented. A joint meeting between the City Council and Planning Commission took place on September 12, 2018 where discussion focused on the Comprehensive Plan amendment and update process, the roles of City Council and the Planning Commission, and details concerning the upcoming 2019 Comprehensive Plan Amendment. Discussion included history of the 2018 Amendment, intent and goals of the final product, timing of the process, and action and direction related to the amendment. At the regular September 18, 2018 City Council Meeting, five motions were passed directing the Planning Commission in the 2019 Comprehensive Plan Amendment process: Motion 1: Request the Planning Commission to assess the Comprehensive Plan and amendment to address internal inconsistencies; June 18, 2019 F - 8 Motion 2: Recommend the Planning Commission evaluate the land use map for the maps compatibility with the vision, goals, policies and objectives stated in the plan; Motion 3: Move to request the Planning Commission recommend amendments to the Comprehensive Plan based on elimination of redundancies, vagueness, and ambiguity; Motion 4: Ask the Planning Commission to evaluate the definition of policy, and make a recommendation regarding that definition in the Comprehensive Plan and the amendment; and Motion 5: Recommend the Planning Commission begin work on the amendment drafting process immediately. On May 8, 2019, the Planning Commission recommended the City Council adopt four distinct amendments to the Comprehensive Plan it had been working on as early as spring of 2018. Work on addressing and fulfilling the five motions made by the Council began on October 24, 2018. On April 15, 2019 the Planning Division submitted its 60 day notice of intent to amend the City's Comprehensive Plan to the Washington State Department of Commerce (WSDOC). In accordance Port Angeles Municipal Code Chapter 18.04.040 the Planning Commission conducted a public hearing on the Amendment on April 24' and continued the hearing to May 8t''. One written comment and one verbal comment were received as a part of the public hearing process. Notice of the application was provided on the following dates and in the following manner: 1. 4/15/19: Notice to WSDOC of Intent to Amend the Comprehensive Plan 2. 4/16/19: City of Port Angeles Website 3. 4/12/19: City Hall, Notice Board 4. 4/10/19: Peninsula Daily News, Circulation 5. 4/24/19: Planning Commission Public Hearing and end to the comment period for the SEPA process. 6. 5/8/19: Continued Public Hearing and Planning Commission recommendation of approval of the 2019 Annual Comprehensive Plan Amendment (Application No. 19-32) to City Council. 7. 5/21/19: CED staff presented the recommendations of the Planning Commission to City Council in a public meeting to inform them of proposed changes and process of the amendment. 8. 5/30/19: Council First Reading of Ordinance of adoption posted on the City's website, including Plan document and Appendices 9. 6/4/19: Public Hearing: First reading of Ordinance and 2019 Plan Amendment. 10. 6/13/19: Council Second Reading of Ordinance of adoption posted on the City's website, including Plan document and Appendices A link to the proposed Comprehensive Plan and Appendices are listed below: https://www. citofpa.us/DocumentCenter/View/6689/2019-Comprehensive-Plan Funding Overview: N/A June 18, 2019 F - 9 ORDINANCE NO. AN ORDINANCE of the City of Port Angeles, Washington adopting a new Amended Comprehensive Plan. WHEREAS, the City of Port Angeles first adopted a Comprehensive Plan on June 28, 1994 and last updated the Comprehensive Plan in June 2016; and WHEREAS, each year the City conducts an annual amendment cycle for the Comprehensive Plan to ensure a consistent review and evaluation of the Plan and City development regulations occurs and, if needed, propose revisions to ensure the plan and regulations comply with the State of Washington's Growth Management Act; and WHEREAS, at the regular September 18, 2018 City Council Meeting five motions were passed directing the Planning Commission in the 2019 Comprehensive Plan Amendment process to: assess the Comprehensive Plan to address internal inconsistencies; evaluate the land use map for the map's compatibility with the vision, goals, policies and objectives stated in the plan; eliminate redundancies, vagueness, and ambiguity; evaluate the definition of policy, and make recommendation regarding that definition in the amendment; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission held several work sessions from October 2018 to April 2019 to review and address all elements of the Plan; and, WHEREAS, all elements of the Comprehensive Plan were reviewed in response to Council's direction, and to comply with the City's its legal obligations to the State of Washington's Growth Management Act; and WHEREAS, the Planning Commission held a public hearing concerning a proposed Amended Comprehensive Plan on May 8 and May 22, 2019; and WHEREAS, after considering all the data, facts, presentations, testimony, comments, and other materials relating to the proposed Amended Comprehensive Plan, the Planning Commission adopted the Findings and Conclusions, which are attached hereto as Exhibit "A; and WHEREAS, after adopting the Findings and Conclusions, the Planning Commission approved and recommended to the City Council the Amended Comprehensive Plan for the City of Port Angeles, which is attached hereto as Exhibit "B"; WHEREAS, the City Council held a public hearing concerning the proposed Amended Comprehensive Plan on June 4 and 18, 2019; and 1 June 18, 2019 F-10 WHEREAS, the Planning Commission has transmitted a copy of its recommendation to the City Council and the City Council has considered the Commission's recommendation; and NOW THEREFORE, THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF PORT ANGELES DO HEREBY ORDAIN as follows: Section 1. The Findings and Conclusions of the City of Port Angeles Planning Commission, attached hereto as Exhibit "A" and incorporated herein by this reference, are hereby adopted. Section 2. The Amended Comprehensive Plan for the City of Port Angeles, attached hereto as Exhibit "B" and incorporated herein by this reference, is hereby adopted as the Comprehensive Plan of the City. The Amended Comprehensive Plan, Exhibit B, supersedes and entirely replaces the Comprehensive Plan adopted on June 28, 1994 and last updated in June 2016. Section 3. A copy of the Amended Comprehensive Plan shall be kept on file with the City Clerk and shall be available for public inspection. Section 4. This ordinance, being an exercise of a power specifically delegated to the City legislative body, is not subject to referendum. This ordinance shall take effect five days after its publication by summary. PASSED by the City Council of the City of Port Angeles at a regular meeting of said Council held on the day of June, 2019. ATTEST: Kari Martinez -Bailey, City Clerk PUBLISHED: June 2019 By Summary 2 Sissi Bruch, Mayor APPROVED AS TO FORM: William E. Bloor, City Attorney June 18, 2019 F-11 EXHIBIT A Findings and Conclusions in Support of Comprehensive Plan Amendment Application No. 19-32, 2019 Annual Comprehensive Plan Amendment: Findings: Based on the information provided in the Community and Economic Development Staff Memorandum for the 2019 annual Comprehensive Plan Amendment (Application No. 19-32) dated May 21, 2019 and staff report to the Planning Commission dated April 24, 2019, including all information in the public record file, comments and testimony presented during the public hearing, the City Council discussion and deliberation, the City of Port Angeles City Council hereby finds that: The City submitted notice of intent to adopt the Comprehensive Plan amendments to the Department of Commerce on April 15, 2019. Notice was received from Department of Commerce that the materials were received for review on April 15, 2019. The City may not take final action on the Comprehensive Plan Amendment proposal until after a 60 - day review period, beginning on the date Commerce received the amendment. 2. Review of the City's Comprehensive Plan may be done on an annual basis. Amendment opportunity is provided and outlined in Chapter 18.04 of the Port Angeles Municipal Code (PAMC). Per Section 18.04.040 PAMC, proposed amendments to the Comprehensive Plan shall be considered on an annual basis, and shall be adopted no more than once a year except when an emergency exists. 3. The proposed amendments to the Comprehensive Plan language are area -wide. 4. Notification of the Comprehensive Plan amendment permit application was placed in the Peninsula Daily News on April 10, 2019 and on the City's website April 16, 2019 with a public comment extending to April 24, 2019. 5. The public notice included a statement the City expects to issue a Determination of Non- significance following the public comment period, which closed on April 24, 2019; this notice was sent to the Department of Ecology on April 5, 2019. 6. The City of Port Angeles adopted its present Comprehensive Plan on June 28, 1994, by Ordinance 2818; it has been regularly amended since its adoption. 7. The City of Port Angeles Planning Commission recommended approval, in a 7-0 vote, of the 2019 Annual Comprehensive Plan Amendment (Application No. 19-32) citing recommended changes listed in Appendices A and D, Appendix E recommendations, and three conclusions in support of that action as listed in the Staff Report Conclusions: Based on the information provided in the Department of Community and Economic Development Staff Memorandum for 2019 annual Comprehensive Plan Amendment (Application No. 19-32) dated May 21, 2019 and staff report to the Planning Commission April 24, 2019, including all of the information in the public record file, comments, and testimony presented during the public hearing, the City Council discussion and deliberation, and listed findings, the City of Port Angeles City Council hereby concludes that: The proposed amendments to the Comprehensive Plan are in compliance with the State's requirements for updating the Comprehensive Plan under the Growth Management Act and with Section 18.04.040 of the Port Angeles Municipal Code. June 18, 2019 F-12 EXHIBIT A 2. The Comprehensive Plan amendments are not in conflict with the City's development regulations or Capital Facilities Plan and will not reduce the level of service required by the Comprehensive Plan for those urban services necessary to serve development projects. 3. The Comprehensive Plan was last thoroughly reviewed and updated in 2017. This annual update is a part of the City's recognized annual amendment cycle. June 18, 2019 F-13 2019 Co prehensive Plar. 1 end ent GIty coundd� iiia 'iii n biian of III: ) 111 111Iii Ilh.....l iiitcing June III iresented by III III . s iiia III; III; iii IIIA IIIA III III III iii III III III n iiia iii III III IIIA iiia . i III III iii iii iii iii iiia iii June 5 — Council resolves to declare Plan meets GMA September 18 — Five Motions made for 2019 Amendment October 11 — 2019 Amendment Kick -Off April 15 — .1 day N• - to of - to Adopt April 24 — Planning Commission Public Hearing May 8 — PC Recommendation to Adopt ................ . ..................... 'e a iiI nn e int of t � iiinin n lily & eve o f limn e int Wednesday, June 19, 201 I & Motion 1: Request the Planning Commission to asses the Comprehensive Plan and amendment to address internal inconsistencies; I Motion 2: Recommend the Planning Commission evaluate the land use map for the maps compatibility with the vision, goals, policies and objectives stated in the plan; .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. ............... . .................. 'e pa iiI nn e int of t � iiinimn n lily & eve Ill o f limn e int Wednesday, June 19, 201 I S Motion 3: Move to request the Planning Commission recommend amendments to the Comprehensive Plan based on elimination of redundancies, vagueness, an,V. ambiguity; Motion 4: Ask the Planning Commission to evaluate the definition of policy, and make a recommendation regarding that definition in the Comprehensive Plan and the amendment; and ................ . ..................... 'e a iiI nn e int of t � iiinin n lily & eve o f limn e int Wednesday, June 19, 201 I Slde 4. Motion 5: Recommend the Planning Commission begin work on the amendment drafting process immediately. 11 of Cuunnunlly & eve Ill o f limn e int Wednesday, June 19, 201 I S The Planning Commission recommends approval of the 2019 Annual Comprehensive Plan Amendment (Application recommended changes listed in Appendices A and D, Appendix E recommendations, and the 3 conclusions in support of that action listed in the Staff Report. ................ . ..................... 'e a iiI nn e int of t � iiinin n lily & eve o f limn e int Wednesday, June 19, 201 I & #1 Inclusion of the AIA SDAT study into the Comprehensive Plan's vision. (2017-18) #2 Edits to the TOC, Ch. 17 &Appendices. (2017-18) #3 Inclusion of Performance Measure Metrics for each City Department. (2017-18) #4 Edits to the Plan's Policies and Actions Ch. 2-11. (2018-19) ................ . ..................... 'e a iiI nn e int of t � iiinin n lily & eve o f limn e int Wednesday, June 19, 201 I Side 7 Figure 3.01— Future Land Use Map '.:. f Ciiinin mill ; naimnli III eve o f limn e int A N 4.250 0 Feet Legend Land use 6 ���Lnw Dnn.itY Residential VV M-tl"um GansNy R.itlnrkial +' H;�h Dcnx(tY R •.Irlent(al Street centerline COPA Street centerline Cnty Wednesday, June 19, 201 f, City g of Port Angeles Com� prehensive"', PlanM 'C a .Ilft� W'tulF � a W :1. R 2019 Amendment N W " r This page is left intentionally blank Acknowledgements 2019 Amendment The following citizen volunteers, past and present elected officials and staff are acknowledged for their various contributions to the 2019 amendment of this Comprehensive Plan, last updated in 2016. These individuals contributed hundreds of hours to a citizen participation process, striving to reflect the wishes of the community in this long-range plan. Everyone's efforts have made this planning effort a success and are greatly appreciated. 2019 City Council Members Sissi Bruch, Mayor Kate Dexter, Deputy Mayor Mike French Cheri Kidd 2019 Planning Commission Members Andrew Schwab Benjamin Stanley Steve Hopkins Duane Morris 2019 Staff Nathan West, City Manager Allyson Brekke, DCED Director 2016 City Council Member Patrick Downie, Mayor Cherie Kidd, Deputy Mayor Brad Collins Dan Gase 2016 Planning Commission Members Andrew Schwab Brian Hunter Chad Aubin Duane Morris 2016 Staff Dan McKeen, City Manager Nathan West, DCED Director Ben Braudrick, Assistant Planner Michael Merideth Jim Moran Lindsey Schromen-Wawrin Amy Powell Mel Messineo Pamela Hastings Tara Lopez Ben Braudrick, Assistant Planner Kevin Bagwell, Planning Technician Michael Merideth Lee Whetham Sissi Bruch Elwyn Gee John Mathews Matt Bailey Craig Fulton, Public Works Director Byron Olson, Finance Director Scott Johns, Associate Planner Consultants: Studio Cascade Inc., Spokane WA Minor amendments are made to the Comprehensive Plan on an annual basis. City Clerk Certification The Plannning Commission recommended adoption of this Comprehensive Plan Amendment on May 22, 2019 to be adopted by the City Council Ordinance # Table of Contents Chapter 1- Introduction Foundationof City Policy......................................................................................................... 1.1 GMACompliance..................................................................................................................... 1.1 Purpose of the Comprehensive Plan........................................................................................ 1.2 Compliance with the Comprehensive Plan.............................................................................. 1.3 Plan Development & Public Participation................................................................................ 1.4 Organization & Requirements of the Comprehensive Plan ...................................................... 1.4 Use of the Comprehensive Plan............................................................................................... 1.8 CommunityVision................................................................................................................... 1.9 City Actions Since the 2004 Update......................................................................................... 1.13 Chapter 2 Growth Management GeneralComments.................................................................................................................. 2.2 GMAGoals & Policies.............................................................................................................. 2.3 Chapter 3 Land Use GeneralComments.................................................................................................................. 3.1 LandUse Categories................................................................................................................ 3.2 Future Land Use Map (Figure 3.01)...................................................................................................3.5 Land Use Map Goals & Policies................................................................................................ 3.7 Residential Goals & Policies..................................................................................................... 3.7 Commercial Goals & Policies................................................................................................... 3.8 Industrial Goals & Policies........................................................................................................ 3.10 Open Space Goals & Policies.................................................................................................... 3.11 Chapter a Transportation GeneralComments..................................................................................................................4.1 Transportation Goals & Policies...............................................................................................4.2 Chapter 5 - Utilities & Public Services GeneralComments.................................................................................................................. 5.1 Utilities Goals & Policies.......................................................................................................... 5.2 Chapter 6 - Housing GeneralComments.................................................................................................................. 6.1 HousingGoals & Policies.......................................................................................................... 6.2 i City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan �� Chapter 7 - Conservation GeneralComments.................................................................................................................. 7.1 Conservation Goals & Policies................................................................................................. 7.2 Chapter 8 - Capital Facilities GeneralComments.................................................................................................................. 8.1 Capital Facilities Goals & Policies............................................................................................. 8.3 Chapter 9 Economic Development GeneralComments..................................................................................................................9.1 Economic Development Goals & Policies................................................................................ 9.2 Chapter 10 - Parks & Recreation GeneralComments................................................................................................................ 10.1 Parks & Recreation Goals & Policies...................................................................................... 10.2 Chapter 11- Implementation GeneralComments................................................................................................................ 11.1 Objectives Table (Table 11.01)........................................................................................................11.3 Appendix A - Community Profile (See Appendix Table of Contents for listing) Appendix B - Definitions (See Appendix Table of Contents for listing) Appendix C - GMA Requirements (See Appendix Table of Contents for listing) Appendix D - Transportation Analysis (See Appendix Table of Contents for listing) 1OM Table of Contents Introduction Foundation of City Policy The comprehensive plan is the policy foundation for the City; it sets fundamental goals, policies, and objectives that are the basis for all action. The City's budget, Capital Facilities Plan, work plan, transportation plan, and departmental performance standards are all based on and are consistent with comprehensive plan policy. The City's strategic plan also ties back to the comprehensive plan, specifically addressing how the City will implement comprehensive plan objectives over the next two years, establishing priorities for action. GMA Compliance In 1990, the Washington State Legislature enacted the State Growth Management Act (GMA), which requires all cities and counties subject to the Act to develop and adopt comprehensive plans and implementing ordinances that will regulate and guide future growth and development. In accordance with the Act, each county must also establish independent Urban Growth Areas capableof containing future growth for the next 20 years. To ensure compatibility between various comprehensive plans, the cities, county, and other affected agencies cooperatively developed a set of county -wide planning policies to guide this process. To ensure orderly development, the City of Port Angeles agreed to work with Clallam County in the development of comprehensive plan goals and policies for the Port Angeles Urban Growth Area (UGA). The Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan has been developed and periodically updated to meet the requirements of the GMA and is consistent with the Clallam County -Wide Planning Policy. This 2016 update was undertaken to meet the State's GMA requirements and included a process intended to capture comments and suggestions from the broadest range of the public. Purpose of the Comprehensive Plan A City's Comprehensive Plan acts as the guiding document for land use controls. All other city plans, ordinances, and regulations must be consistent with the goals, policies, and intent of the City's Comprehensive Plan. If subordinate planning or regulations, such as the City's Zoning Ordinance or Capital Facility Plan, are not consistent with the goals and policies of the Comprehensive Plan, then those documents may be determined to be illegal and rendered invalid. Prior to the passage of the State GMA, such compliance was considered desirable but actual consistency was not required. The GMA now makes such compliance a requirement. The Comprehensive Plan is the basis upon which local governmental decisions are to be made. It sets forth the City's goals and policies and visualizes directions the City will take over the next two decades. The Comprehensive Plan Land Use Map illustrates the desired development pattern for the city. It is, therefore, important that the Comprehensive Plan truly reflect the goals and desires of the community. In order for that to take place, it is vital that citizens take an active role in determining the quality, context, and vision incorporated within this Comprehensive Plan. Chapter 1 - Introduction 1.2 �i Figure 1.01— The 2016 update process reviewed and updated this plan's vision, as well as many of its implementing policies and objectives. (Image: Studio Cascade, Inc.) Compliance with the Comprehensive Plan The Comprehensive Plan is the foundation upon which the City's development regulations (zoning, environmentally sensitive areas protection, parking and sign codes, and subdivision ordinances) and Urban Services Standards and Guidelines Manual, Capital Facilities Plan and Urban Services and Utilities Plans are based, and from which the City's future land use pattern will come. A community is a diverse and heterogeneous grouping of people. Individually, each of us has a set of treasured values. Together, we give the community a set of shared values. In a community, individual values often clash and indeed must confront each other if the shared values of the community are to develop. Good planning uncovers the values we share as a community and uses the shared values to guide development of the Comprehensive Plan. No plan can be expected to last for all time. Times change, conditions change, and what we value in our community changes. Even though this Comprehensive Plan is intended to cover a 20- year period, the State requires it to be reviewed at least every seven years and can be amended on an annual basis as necessary. This allows the City to adjust the Comprehensive Plan as conditions, Chapter 1 - Introduction 1.3 �i needs, and desires of the community change. Through the ongoing development of this Comprehensive Plan, the City of Port Angeles reaffirms that it is the rightful goal of the people of our community to take an active role, sharing the work and responsibility involved in determining the character, quality, and destiny of this community. Plan Development & Public Participation The Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan was initially updated from its 1976 version under the GMA in June of 1994. The City's last major update to the Comprehensive Plan was in 2016. Several minor amendments have been approved since that time. The 2016 updates reflected a citywide approach with an ambitious public participation program. The 2016 update of the Comprehensive Plan was updated to meet the requirements of the GMA. Areas of the plan that were expanded to include handling of archaeological discoveries and sites, the inclusion of low -impact stormwater management methods that more closely mimic natural processes, increased emphasis on urban forestry and landscaping and consideration of issues surrounding climatic change. The City of Port Angeles allows amendments to the Comprehensive Plan to occur on an annual basis, within limited time periods. The intent of this allowance is to address the community's destre to adjest zoning, which might also require a change in land use designation. Individual citizens or groups may propose Comprehensive Plan amendments during the three month period between January 1 and March 31 of each year. Proposed amendments require environmental review, consideration by the Planning Commission and opportunity for the public to participate, and a public hearing prior adoption by the City Council. Organization & Requirements of the Comprehensive Plan The Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan is organized with an (1) Introduction, (2) a series of required and included elements., and (3) various appendixes including community profile, definition section, the Capital Facilities Plan, Housing Needs Assessment, Chapter 1 - Introduction 1.4 �i and Environmental Impact Statement. Each element addresses a particular topic and contains a general comment section and multiple goals with various related policies and objectives. Some of the elements have an associated map or plan. The Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan goals are expressed as broad statements of intent that will fulfill the vision of what the city intends to become or how the city should look or feel in the future. The goals in the Comprehensive Plan are supported by policy statements that usually include the word should. The policy statements are directive, and provide a basis for decision- making and establish a principal of wise management leading to achievement of a goal. Objectives are statements of specific actions that when taken will result in the realization of a goal. The GMA requires that a comprehensive plan consist of a map or maps and descriptive text covering objectives, principles, and standards used to develop the comprehensive plan. The plan must also be an internally consistent document, with all elements made consistent with the Comprehensive Plan Land Use Map. The Land Use Map is provided to show general uses to be located in generalized areas of the City. The plan shows six general land use categories: Low, Medium and High -Density Residential; and Commercial, Industrial, and Open Space. These general land use areas are not specifically bounded by streets, parcel lines, or other political boundaries. For purposes of this plan, they are separated by what is referred to as "imprecise margins." These, together with the land use categories, provide a framework and direction for desired development patterns, while at the same time, allow for flexibility in applying zoning designations. The GMA requires that comprehensive plans include a plan, scheme, or design for each of the following: • Land Use Element • Transportation Element • Utilities Element • Housing Element • Capital Facilities Plan Element. Additionally, comprehensive plans must contain a process for identifying and siting Essential Public Facilities. tI ►®— Chapter 1 - Introduction 1.5 This plan contains each of the required elements as well as four additional optional elements: A Conservation Element, an Economic Development Element, a Growth Management Element and a Parks & Recreation Element. Each of the elements have been developed to be consistent with the GMA and to reflect the needs and desires of the City of Port Angeles and its citizens. Detailed minimum requirements for GMA-required elements are provided in Appendix C. tI ►®— Chapter 1 - Introduction 1.6 Ideals Implementing Plans` Pla ns D� artrraentai j Subarea Pla ns Topical Research Nq Strategic »y Plans Values Behave -ors 2 0bjecdves ;rndude programs, cupltai Investments, regWatiDm ete,. -1 fx°omples anIV. rmoeman&g plans may Include a wide warkly ojp(arr types Figure 1.02 — Comprehensive plans are organized as tiered systems, expressing community desires from broad -brush ideals (vision) through specific action items the City can lead (objectives). Other types of plans are sometimes prepared to identify or help implement objectives, taking vision, goal and policy cues from the comprehensive plan. (Image: Studio Cascade, Inc.) I►®� ` Chapter 1 - Introduction 1.7 Use of the Comprehensive Plan The Comprehensive Plan is designed to be used by the public as a way for citizens to learn the long-range goals and policies of the City. It is also used as a foundation upon which City officials make land use and other decisions, and as a tool which City staff uses to ensure desirable development of the City. This document provides a sense of predictability to citizens of the city or potential residents considering relocating to Port Angeles. The Plan's Environmental Impact Statement (EIS, Appendix A) is designed as a programmatic EIS and may be used as a phased reviewed environmental document for any plans, ordinances, programs, or development projects that are consistent with the goals and policies of the Comprehensive Plan. The EIS has been updated through addenda and regular State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) review as amendments to the Comprehensive Plan have been periodically approved. Any project proposed in the City will have to show that it is consistent with the Comprehensive Plan. If it is not, it cannot be approved unless the Comprehensive Plan is amended and additional environmental review is completed Chapter 1 - Introduction 1.8 �i Community Vision The Comprehensive Plan public process with the 2016 mandated update resulted in the following vision statements for a variety of specific areas of interest to citizens, Vision statements are based on the anticipated conditions of Port Angeles in 2036. The City of Port Angeles is vibrant and prospering, nurturing a balance of innovation and tradition to create an environmentally, economically, and fiscally sustainable community, accepting and cherishing its social diversity, small-town character and natural setting. In achieving this vision, Port Angeles recognizes the important roles each of the following plays: Environment Port Angeles' natural setting – with the Strait to the north and the Olympics to the south – is unique, with creeks, wetlands, steep slopes and a weather pattern that can be demanding. The town balances the community's need for economic stability, its potential for growth and the preservation of the areas' natural systems. Economic Development am Keeping the community em well -served are key econo of Port Angeles facilitates ployed, prosperous, educated, and m is development objectives. The City sustained economic growth, directing investment to revitalize activity downtown, support local employment, and keep public services affordable and of high quality. Neighborhoods Slightly more than 25,000 people call Port Angeles home in 2036, residing in neighborhoods that are safe, attractive and rich in character. Airport Fairchild International Airport is an important aviation resource for local residents and businesses, operating as an important economic development and community safety priority and with regular commercial service to SeaTac International Airport. tI ►®— Chapter 1 - Introduction 1.9 Downtown M, _. Port Angeles' central business district is vital and prominent. The central commercial district is one of Port Angeles' major assets, intimately connected to the waterfront and featuring a variety of retail, civic, residential and professional office uses. Small Commercial Centers Small-scale commercial centers are located in areas convenient for nearby residents and workers, offering a modest array of goods and services within an easy, enjoyable walk from nearby homes and employment centers. Waterfront w The central waterfront is an active and successful civic and social space, equally welcoming to residents and visitors. 'm!% -:Transportation Mit ' a.` aimPort Angeles' transportation network moves people and goods to, through and within the community, harmoniously accommodating cars, bikes, trucks, public transportation, planes, boats, ferries, and travel by foot. A-N%Abk I Community Services k The community's systems of housing, transportation, economic 1_ development and parks and recreation coordinate to serve all of Port Angeles' residents, ensuring public safety, economic opportunity, public health and overall community wellness. Trails Port Angeles' trail system builds on the Olympic Discovery Trail and miles of local trails, contributing to the local quality of life by inviting community residents and visitors of all ages to wander and explore. Chapter 1 - Introduction 1.10 �i Parks and Recreation Leisure is an important contributor to quality of life, and Port Angeles is committed to provide a robust parks and recreation system in response. Open spaces, both constructed and natural, function to enliven the human spirit. Whether it's a small pocket park near downtown, a waterfront esplanade, a sculpture garden on the hill, or a vast sports complex, the system serves multiple community needs. The American Institute of Architects Sustainable Design Assessment Team Report Vision In 2009, the City of Port Angeles was inspired by the concept of bringing in individuals with an outside eye to review development trends and community issues. The City prepared a grant application to the American Institute of Architect's Center for Communities by Design focused on tourism and community development. The application sought a Sustainable Design Assessment Team (SDAT) to travel to Port Angeles. In March of that year five (5) team members engaged the community to learn more about local challenges and to present a series of resolutions to those issues. An intense three day planning exercise ended with thirty new recommendations for the community to pursue. Allured by the quality and respect given to the American Institute of Architects organization participation was widespread resulting in a high level of interest far beyond that of a typical planning process. Community members filled Council chambers and anxiously sought follow up to the recommendations. The City made a commitment to move forward with recommendations. Specifically the City Council sub -committee known as the Port Angeles Forward Committee assisted in getting the low hanging fruit of the plan implemented. Instead of waiting for the final report, the Committee dissected the power point presentation from the final evening meeting of the SDAT process and developed a detailed list of each specified project. Within two weeks, 10 items were moved forward to City Council for implementation. Next the City promoted an additional public meeting for members of the public to publicly rank each of the SDAT team recommendations. Chapter 1 - Introduction 1.11 �i Immediate items included comprehensive plan changes and policy oriented issues which shifted focus towards specific capital projects and code changes. The first ten implementation items included the introduction of 5 new items in the City Capital Facilities Plan and 5 new policy items for insertion in the City's Comprehensive Plan. Since this initial year new items from the plan have been implemented annually. The American Institute of Architects (AIA) report has become the Council endorsed vision for the City of Port Angeles. This vision complemented by the continued public input received at public meetings and engagement sessions over the last nine (9) years. The vision focuses on improving: the gateways to our community, our downtown, our primary transportation corridors and sustaining and enhancing the quality of our local environment and economy. The visions approach is: • integrative, holistic, and visual; • central to achieving a sustainable relationship between humans, the natural environment, and the place; • it gives three-dimensional form to a culture and a place; and • it achieves balance between culture, environment, and economic systems. Today the comprehensive plan acts as one of the primary implementing instruments of the AIA report. Chapter 1 - Introduction 1.12 �i LL Figure 1.03 – Phase II of efforts identified in the 2013 Waterfront & Transportation Improvement Plan (a subarea plan) designed, permitted and re-established a beach just west of Oak Street. The site had formerly been graded and utilized for mill operations. (Images: City of Port Angeles, Studio Cascade, Inc.) City Actions Since the 2004 Update Since the last major update of the Comprehensive Plan, several objectives have been accomplished. Those accomplishments include the replacement of both century - old trestle bridges spanning Valley Creek and Tumwater Creek on 8th Street. The bridge spanning Peabody Creek at Lauridsen Boulevard was replaced with a structure that will allow truck traffic to make the turn and follow Lauridsen as intended for a cross-town alternative to Highway 101. The City's landfill has been closed and converted into a regional transfer station, and work to remove waste materials that remain in the marine bluff and stabilize the bluff to prevent further adverse impacts to the shoreline is now complete. A major project to resolve long-standing issues with combined sewer/stormwater systems overflowing into the Strait of Juan de Fuca has been completed and the second project phase is underway and nearing completion. The City has followed through with the creation of new zone designations in anticipation of future annexations, especially the tI ►®— Chapter 1 - Introduction 1.13 Figure 1.04 — Phase I of efforts identified in the 2013 Waterfront & Transportation Improvement Plan designed and created a new esplanade along Railroad Avenue between Laurel and Oak streets. (Image: LMN Architects) eastern UGA. The Commercial Regional zone was created to be applied to areas along Highway 101 where existing large commercial uses such as car dealerships and large -volume stores currently exist or where land is available for such uses. A major infrastructure goal was achieved with the extension of a sewer main line to the eastern UGA. A second new zone was created for large suburban -scale residential lots. The Residential Single Family zone (RS -11), restricting residential lots to a minimum of 11,000 square feet or larger has been applied to areas within existing city limits. An Industrial Marine (IM) zone was also created to be applied to shoreline areas focusing primarily on marine trades that may need the support of commercial uses to provide a framework for mixed uses in a campus -like environment. In 2009 the City received a grant from the American Institute of Architects (AIA). The grant resulted community planning effort known as the Sustainable Design Assessment. The AIA Sustainable Design Assessment Team Report has been adopted and incorporated as an extension of the Comprehensive Plan. Implementation of the document can be found throughout the implementation chapter of this document as well as in the City's Strategic Plan. Chapter 1 - Introduction 1.14 �i Industrial zoning was modified to include the potential for work/live situations, where working artists requiring large work studios with industrial types of activities, are permitted to live at their studios by conditional use permit. A major planning effort was completed in 2014. The Shoreline Master Program (SMP) was approved and accepted by the Department of Ecology, completing a five-year effort that included the writing of a new Harbor Resource Management Plan, Shoreline Inventory/Characterization/Analysis Document, a Cumulative Impacts Analysis and a Shoreline Restoration Plan. The shoreline planning effort took place concurrently with several restoration projects occurring on the south shoreline of Ediz Hook. The last phase of shoreline restoration was completed during the summer months of 2016, and will result in a continuous restored shoreline from Harbor View Park on the east to Sail and Paddle Park on the west. A 358 -acre area was annexed into the City in 2005. The area is located along the south side of Highway 101, west of the city limits at that time. The area primarily consists of the Eclipse Industrial Park, accommodating several large operations, and much of the area is zoned Industrial Heavy. Portions of the annexed area along Highway 101 also include commercial and residential uses. Another major accomplishment is the construction of a Waterfront Promenade located between Oak Street and Laurel Street in the city's downtown. The promenade was the first phase of a multi- phase project planned for the downtown waterfront. The second phase, also completed, included creation of two small beach areas where hard - armored shoreline once existed west of Oak Street to the Valley Creek Estuary Park. Enhancements to the Waterfront Trail are also an integral portion of the project. Subsequent phases will improve the portion of Railroad Avenue east of Laurel Street to City Pier Park. An associated downtown project that had been anticipated for several years was also completed. This "Gateway Project" resulted in a downtown transit center and covered pavilion area for public activities. The pavilion is now used regularly for the local Farmers Market, and as a venue for various festivals. Chapter 1 - Introduction 1.15 �i A portion of downtown's sidewalks and water lines were replaced beginning in 2006. As part of that project, the west side of Laurel Street between First and Front was developed to preserve the last remaining portion of the "Port Angeles Underground." Regionally, a major effort involved the removal of the two dams placed on the Elwha River a century ago. This project included reconstruction of the City's water collection system and the intake for the industrial water supply. In addition, a new bridge was built spanning the river. The new bridge includes a suspended pedestrian/ bicycle segment of the Olympic Discovery Trail. The Olympic Discovery Trail between the western city limits and 18th Street was improved as the trail right-of-way and was also used for a sewer line extension to the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe's reservation lands. The sewer extension outside of the city was made necessary by the removal of the dams upstream from the reservation. The removal of the dams resulted in a higher ground water table, making on-site sewer drainfields unusable. The reservation is now served by City sewer facilities. In 2007, the City added a Parks & Recreation Element to the Comprehensive Plan. In 2009, the City implemented a Fagade and Sign Improvement Grant program to help small businesses enhance the appearance of buildings in the city. Another effort at citywide beautification was accomplished in 2014 with the passage of a Street Tree Ordinance. The passage of the ordinance resulted in the City being awarded the "Tree City USA" designation from the National Arbor Day Foundation. All of the above-mentioned projects were included in the earlier version of the Comprehensive Plan as goals, policies, or objectives. Chapter 1 - Introduction 1.16 �i 2.1 page is intentionally left blank) City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan Growth Management This Comprehensive Plan has been developed in accordance with the requirements of the State Growth Management Act (GMA). The City met all of the Act's required deadlines for compliance and participated with Clallam County (The County), the City of Forks, the City of Sequim, area Tribes and Nei other agencies in the development of a County - Wide Planning Policy. Early in the planning process, the City agreed with the County to address only areas within the current City Limits in the Comprehensive Plan and to work with the County on a joint Comprehensive Plan for the Urban Growth Area (UGA). On April 13, 1993, the Board of Clallam County Commissioners adopted an Interim Port Angeles UGA. In 2005, the City and County entered into an interlocal agreement on a phased annexation plan for the Eastern UGA. A similar agreement was reached regarding the western UGA. At that time, the City established the intended zones that would be applied to areas annexed to the City from the Eastern UGA. The following goals and policies are included to insure continued compliance with the GMA, and compatibility with the County's Comprehensive Plan outside of the Port Angeles UGA (PAUGA). Actions related to GMA goals and policies are included in Chapter 11, Implementation. ■ GMA Goals & Policies Goal G -2A To manage growth in a responsible manner that is beneficial to the community as a whole, is sensitive to the rights and needs of individuals, and is consistent with the State of Washington's Growth Management Act. Policies P -2A.01 In all its actions and to the extent consistent with the provisions of this comprehensive plan, the City will strive to implement the following goals of the State Growth Management Act: a) Urban growth. Encourage development in urban areas where adequate public facilities and services exist or can be provided in an efficient manner. b) Reduce sprawl. Reduce the inappropriate conversion of undeveloped land into sprawling, low-density development. c) Transportation. Encourage efficient multi- modal transportation systems that are based on regional priorities and coordinated with county and city comprehensive plans. d) Housing. Encourage the availability of affordable housing to all economic segments of the population. Promote a variety of residential densities and housing types and sizes, and encourage preservation and expansion of existing housing stock. e) Economic development. Encourage economic development throughout the region that is consistent with adopted comprehensive plans, promote economic opportunity, especially for unemployed and for disadvantaged persons, and encourage growth in areas experiencing insufficient economic growth, all within the capacities of the region's natural resources, public services and public facilities. f) Property rights. Private property should not be taken for public use without just compensation having been made. The property rights of landowners should be protected from arbitrary and discriminatory actions. 2.3 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti gJ Permits. Applications for both state and local government permits should be processed in a timely and fair manner to ensure predictability. hJ Natural resource industries. Maintain and enhance regional natural resource-based industries, including productive timber management, agricultural, and fisheries industries. iJ Open space and recreation. Encourage the retention of open space and development of recreational opportunities, conserve fish and wildlife jJ Habitat areas. Increase access to natural resource lands and water, and develop parks. kJ Environment. Protect the environment and enhance the state's high quality of life, including air and water quality, and the availability of water. IJ Citizen participation and coordination. Encourage the involvement of citizens in the planning process and ensure coordination between communities and jurisdictions to reconcile conflicts. mJ Public facilities and services. Ensure that those public facilities and services necessary to support development should be adequate to serve the development at the time the development is available for occupancy and use without decreasing current service levels below locally established minimum standards. n) Historic preservation. Identify and encourage the preservation of lands, sites and structures that have historical or archaeological significance. P -2A.02 The Port Angeles Urban Growth Area (PAUGA) should be established based at a minimum upon land use demand as determined by the Clallam County 20 -year population forecast for Clallam County and specified sub -areas, so long as the county -wide forecast is not less than the most recent forecasts available from the State Office of Financial Management. P -2A.03 Provide urban services/facilities consistent with the Capital Facilities Element. P -2A.04 Work with the County and other service providers to determine the appropriate levels of service for such facilities and services and to ensure consistency between service provision within the City, the PAUGA, and the County. P -2A.05 Include areas in the PAUGA that are characterized by urban growth adjacent to the existing City boundaries and take into account the area's physical features. P -2A.06 Locate land designated for commercial or industrial uses that encourage adjacent urban development within the PAUGA. P -2A.07 Base the amount of acreage designated for commercial, industrial, or other non-residential uses within the PAUGA upon the Land Use Element and Economic Development Element in the City's Comprehensive Plan. tI ►®— Chapter 2 - Growth Management Element 2.4 P -2A.08 Avoid and exclude critical areas and resource lands in the inclusion of the PUAGA unless addressed as part of the City's Comprehensive Plan. P -2A.09 Include, at a minimum, planning and the provision of sanitary sewer systems, solid waste collection/disposal systems, water systems, urban roads and pedestrian facilities, street cleaning services, transit systems, stormwater systems, police, fire and emergency services systems, electrical and communication systems, school and health care facilities, and neighborhood and/or community parks within the PAUGA. P -2A.10 Be the ultimate provider of urban services within the City limits and the PAUGA for those services the City provides except to the extent otherwise provided in a UGA Urban Services and Development Agreement that is reached pursuant to the County -Wide Planning Policy. P -2A.11 Provide constructed urban services/facilities for which the City is the ultimate provider to meet the design and construction standards of the City. P -2A.12 Demonstrate the financial capability for continued operation of a new facility prior to construction. P -2A.13 Ensure the protection of critical areas occurring within the PAUGA. P -2A.14 Promulgate all development regulations with due regard for private property rights in order to avoid regulatory takings or violation of due process and to protect property rights of landowners from arbitrary and discriminatory actions. P -2A.15 Work with the County to designate and set aside additional lands on the west side of the City for industrial and commercial purposes, both inside the City limits and in the UGA. P -2A.16 Establish performance measures to review progress toward accommodating growth and to ensure appropriate actions are taken to achieve the goals within the Comprehensive Plan. Goal G-2113 To ensure the orderly transition of land within the PAUGA into the City of Port Angeles. Policies P-26.01 Annexation of land outside the established boundaries of the PAUGA shall not be allowed. P-26.02 Annexation of land from within the established boundaries of the PAUGA shall be in accordance with the adopted annexation laws. P-26.03 Annexation of land not adjacent to and/or contiguous with the established City Limits boundary -line, should not be allowed. 2.5 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan t �� P-26.04 Appropriately classify and zone such land at the time of annexation based upon the City Comprehensive Land Use Map and the City Comprehensive Plan. The provisions, restrictions, and requirements of The Port Angeles Zoning Code shall apply to development of the annexed area. P-26.05 Remain consistent with the orderly extension of urban services/facilities and be in accordance with the City's Comprehensive Plan and capital facility planning in the annexation and development of land. P-26.06 Restrict annexation of developed land that cannot meet established concurrency requirements of the City within six years from the time of annexation. P-26.07 Restrict annexation of land that results in decreased minimum standards for City streets, water service, sewer service, and/or electrical service provided to existing residents of the City. P-26.08 Restrict annexation of land that results in decreased minimum standards for City solid waste collection, stormwater management programs, emergency services and/or telecommunication services provided to existing residents of the City. P-26.09 Draw annexation boundaries to eliminate boundary, interjurisdictional, and service problems. P-26.10 Obtain necessary rights-of-way and easements prior to or at the time of annexation. P-26.11 Facilitate annexation in a manner that will minimize financial impact to all residents and businesses. P-26.12 Annex urban growth areas (UGAs) in accordance with State statutes as facilities are extended into those areas and as new urban development takes place. 0 Chapter 2 - Growth Management Element 2.6 �i 2.7 page is intentionally left blank) City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan Land Use The Land Use Element establishes City policy regarding how land may be developed. This element and its Future Land Use Map (Figure 3.01) establishes the following six comprehensive plan land use categories: • Low Density Residential • Medium Density Residential • High Density Residential • Commercial • Industrial • Open Space. These categories and their associated areas are configured in coordination with a wide range of planning considerations including population projections and a developable lands inventory, per GMA requirements. Details on these factors may be found in Appendices A and C. Together, the goal and policy framework presented in this element provides direction in realizing Port Angeles' long-range vision regarding land use - including optimizing the city's relationship with its setting; supporting safe, attractive and character- rich neighborhoods; creating a more dynamic, successful downtown; and supporting a wide range of recreational opportunities available to the entire community. Actions related to Land Use goals and policies are included in Chapter 11, Implementation. Land Use Categories These land use categories are described below and located on the Future Land Use Map. Low Density Residential (Up to 6 units per acre) The Land Use Map identifies three separate categories of residential land use. The first category is Low Density Residential, which allows an overall residential density to 6 units per acre. The high majority of residentially designated property in the City will be of this designation. It is intended primarily to accommodate single family homes. It also allows for the development of accessory residential units and duplexes in accordance with zoning regulations. Medium Density Residential (Up to 14 units per acre) This category encourages property development involving multiple residential units including but not limited to duplexes, townhouses, condominiums, and apartments at a density no less than 4 units per acre and up to 14 units per acre. High Density Residential (Up to 40 units per acre) This category encourages development at a density no less than 10 units per acre and up to 40 units per acre. Itis intended for areas where a higher concentration of residents is compatible with the surrounding area and uses. Condominiums and apartments, are the most common types of building designs appropriate for this category. An exception is made for existing motel or hotel units converted to residential units at a density greater than 40 Units per acre). Commercial The Land Use Map contains one commercial category, thus providing maximum flexibility in the types of commercial uses allowed in permitted locations under the City's Zoning Ordinance. Industrial The Land Use Map also designates only one industrial category, thus again providing maximum in the types of industrial uses allowed in permitted locations under the City's Zoning Ordinance. 3.2 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti Open Space The Open Space category specifies areas of the City with unique or significant physical open spaces, such as marine shorelines, bluffs, ravines, major streams, wetlands, critical wildlife habitat, and other natural areas deemed important to the community. This category also includes developed parks and recreational spaces. The development of natural open space areas should minimize degradation the remaining natural open space. Goal G -3A t ►�� Chapter 3 - Land Use Element 3.3 �i (This page intentionally left blank) iloal'ajoi L-0 ti ■ Land Use Map Goals & Policies Goal G -3A To guide land development in a manner that balances providing certainty about future land use and allowing flexibility necessary to adapt to future challenges and opportunities. Policies P -3A.01 Use the Comprehensive Plan Land Use Map as a conceptual guide when making all zoning and other land use decisions, including all land use decisions and approvals made by City Council and/or any of its appointed Commissions, Boards, or Committees. P -3A.02 Use low impact development techniques, where feasible in new land development. ■ Residential Goals & Policies Goal G-3113 To ensure residential land use and development is compatible with the environment with existing uses and residents, and with desired urban design. Policies P-36.01 Provide urban services to all residential areas as required by the Capital Facilities Element concurrency policy. P-36.02 Ensure that single family lots are of reasonable shape and have access provided by a collector arterial, local access street or alley. P-36.03 Require the subdivision of large lots which leaves remaining lots larger than the minimum density for the zone to allow future subdivisions at the densities permitted for the zone in which they are located. P-36.04 Design streets and circulation patterns in all new residential developments to enable fire protection and service vehicle access as key factors in street design and circulation pattern. P-36.05 Encourage street improvements and acquisition of rights-of-way to further the grid street pattern in the central "townsite" area of the City. Permit cul-de-sacs and curvilinear streets in outlying areas subject to low impact development standards when designed in conjunction with the main street grid. Chapter 3 - Land Use Element �i 3.7 0 P-36.06 Encourage residential development to preserve and capitalize on existing unique natural, historic, archaeological, and/or cultural features including promotion of native and drought tolerant vegetation and scenic views. Encourage design of new residential development that maximizes southern exposures and solar efficiency, protects from prevailing winds, and is designed to minimize energy use. P-38.07 Emphasize the overall density of the development rather than minimum lot sizes when planning new residential development. Goal G -3C To create and maintain a fulfilling and enjoyable community of viable districts and neighborhoods with a variety of residential types attractive to people of all ages, characteristics and interests. Policies P -3C.01 Employ the district and neighborhood concept when developing residential land. Although such districts may be composed primarily of residential uses of a uniform density, the most healthy, viable districts are composed of residential uses of varying densities, and may be augmented, by other compatible uses. Single family and multi -family homes, parks and open -spaces, schools, churches, day care and residential services, home occupations, and district shopping areas are all legitimate components of residential districts P -3C.02 Ensure medium and high density housing is served by arterial streets of sufficient size in order to satisfy traffic demand and to lessen neighborhood traffic congestion. P -3C.03 Apply medium and high density housing policies to mobile home parks. P -3C.04 Treat manufactured homes that meet current state regulations as site constructed housing for zoning purposes. P -3C.05 Expand housing opportunities in the Central Business District for all income levels, with an emphasis moderately priced owner -occupied units. Commercial Goals & Policies Goal G-311) To create and maintain a healthy and diverse commercial sector for a balanced and stable local economy. Policies P -3D.01 Encourage the recruitment of new and the retention of existing commercial developments and businesses 3.8 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti P -3D.02 Allow public uses such as government offices, public service buildings, and other public and quasi -public facilities and services in commercially designated areas. Goal G -3E To provide shopping areas meeting the needs of all City residents and visitors that are safe, compatible with surrounding land uses, and congruent with environmental goals. Policies P -3E.01 Mitigate the impacts of commercial development on adjacent residential properties, including the use of site design elements that soften the impacts. P -3E.02 Separate vehicles and bicycles from pedestrian areas whenever possible to accommodate vehicular traffic and pedestrian safety. P -3E.03 Locate shopping areas at the intersections of arterial streets of sufficient size to satisfy traffic demand and at the boundaries of neighborhoods so that more than one neighborhood may be served. Goal G -3F To provide a pleasant, safe, and attractive shopping environment in the traditional downtown waterfront area including a wide variety of shopping, dining, entertainment, arts, culture, and housing opportunities for visitors and residents alike. Policies P -3F.01 Guide commercial development in the traditional downtown to emphasize its waterfront location and historic heritage P -3F.02 Orient the design of commercial development in downtown around pedestrian travel, tourist enjoyment, and protection from adverse weather conditions. P -3F.03 Actively promote improvements to the traditional downtown area through beautification projects and in cooperation with downtown business merchants. P -3F.04 Encourage residential units in the downtown area as part of a mixed- use development concept, including live/work spaces. Ensure that the downtown physical environment is amenable to residential development by minimizing traffic impacts, maintaining security, and providing and maintaining amenities. t ►�� Chapter 3 - Land Use Element 3.9 �i 0 Industrial Goals & Policies Goal G -3G To create and maintain a healthy and diverse industrial sector for a balanced and stable local economy. Policies P -3G.01 Develop and promote a cooperative intergovernmental plan for comprehensive development of industrial infrastructure and amenities to attract and support light and heavy industry. P -3G.02 Allow office, commercial, and limited live/work uses in specifically designated industrial areas. Encourage live/work environments for art or media based cultural activities that are consistent with and avoid impact on neighboring industrial uses. P -3G.03 Consider the William R. Fairchild International Airport an essential public facility, as referenced in Appendix B (Clallam County -Wide Planning Process). Goal G -3H To provide opportunities for industrial development in a manner, which efficiently uses the community's natural resources and physical environment, has minimal impact on the natural environment, contributes to quality of life, and is compatible with the desired development patterns Policies P-311-11.01 Ensure provision of urban services to all industrial areas, as required by the Capital Facilities Element concurrency policy. P-311-11.02 Develop infrastructure, which makes sites attractive and ready to develop, including transportation facilities and utilities at industrial parks. Industrial development should be encouraged to follow industrial park design concepts. P-311-11.03 Ensure that industrial areas mitigate nuisances and hazardous characteristics such as noise, air, water, odor, pollution, or objectionable visual material. P-311-11.04 Do not permit petroleum refineries, liquefied natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas facilities, non -clean energy facilities, energy plants and their associated facilities and associated transmission facilities (as defined in Chapter 80.50 RCW) outside the heavy industrial use area and without conditional use review. These facilities are hazardous to the community and detrimental to the general environment of the area. 3.10 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti P-311-11.05 Discourage the siting of land uses incompatible with airport related uses and other neighboring land uses adjacent to the William R. Fairchild International Airport P-311-11.06 Allow the conditional siting of clean -energy facilities (e.g., solar, wind, geothermal, wave, tidal) outside of industrial areas. P-311-11.07 Consider the climate change impacts of any proposed new industrial activity or expansion before approval. Goal G-31 To facilitate reuse of large vacant or isolated industrial areas no longer in operation to improve the local economy and employment stability. Policies P-31.01 Allow a wide range of land uses in the redevelopment of large vacant or isolated industrial areas no longer in operation, including mixed-use development, commercial development, or residential development as well as industrial uses, provided that these uses will not encourage the conversion of other industrial areas to non -industrial use. ■ Open Space Goals & Policies Goal G -3J To create open space within the urban landscape, retain natural landscapes, preserve fish and wildlife habitat, and to provide natural corridors connecting wildlife habitats. Policies P-31.01 Preserve unique or major physical features such as marine shorelines, bluffs, ravines, streams, wetlands, wildlife habitat and other environmentally sensitive areas deemed of significant importance to the community as designated open space. P-31.02 Promote the preservation of wildlife habitat and open space corridors between the waterfront and Olympic National Park. P-31.03 Regulate access to natural areas open spaces so as to avoid degrading areas and to protect the rights of property owners. Discourage intensive recreational uses and construction of impervious surfaces in sensitive open spaces. P-31.04 Preserve wooded areas, vegetation, and individual trees in the urban landscape, as they serve a functional purpose in climate, noise, light, habitat, and pollution control. t ►�� Chapter 3 - Land Use Element 3.11 �i Goal G -31K To encourage the development of parks and recreational opportunities for all residents of the City and to increase access to natural areas in a manner that minimizes adverse impacts, and achieves the desired urban design of the City. Policies P -311K.01 Ensure that development and planning of parks and recreational facilities is consistent with the Capital Facilities Element. P -311K.02 Distribute public parks and recreational facilities equitably throughout the City to afford access to all residents. P -311K.03 Utilize land donated for public use to provide common open space, public buildings, parks, and recreational opportunities, while incorporating LID techniques and BMPs in all projects where feasible. P -311K.04 Preserve and maintain unique or major physical features contained within the boundaries of City parks and recreational areas for access and enjoyment by residents of the community. P -311K.05 Cooperate with the County and other jurisdictions in planning, funding, constructing, and managing multi-purpose recreation and transportation trails which link together various areas of the City, the Port Angeles Urban Growth Area (PAUGA), and other areas of the County and region. 0 3.12 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti Transportation The intent of the Transportation Element is to define in a comprehensive manner how vehicular traffic and non -motorized modes of travel are to be routed from one portion of the community to another in the most efficient, economical, and compatible manner. The City's Circulation Plan in accordance with the Statewide National Functional Classification System identifies the City's principal arterial streets, minor arterial streets, and collectors with the remaining streets classified as local streets (See Figure A914). The City's Circulation Plan acknowledges that such a regional system serves many functions. It is a means of intercity commuting, a way to promote economic development, a means to promote a healthy lifestyle, and a way to provide future utility right-of- way. Together, the goal and policy framework presented in this element (and the analysis in Appendix D) provides direction in realizing the City's long-range vision regarding transportation - including support for a strong economy; creating walkable, people - friendly environments; and improving the health and quality of life for all residents of Port Angeles. Actions related to Transportation are included in Chapter 11, Implementation. TO 0 Transportation Goals & Policies Goal G -4A To develop a coordinated, multimodal transportation system, which serves all areas of the city and all types of users in a safe, economical, and efficient manner. Policies P -4A.01 The safety of non -motorized modes of transportation shall be a primary consideration in the circulation system. P -4A.02 Planning for transportation services and facilities (including public streets, bikeways, pedestrian walkways, public and private air, marine and land transit services and facilities) shall be performed consistent with the goals and policies of the Capital Facilities Element. P -4A.03 Road improvements should provide for alternate modes of transportation, and new roads should be evaluated for the ability to accommodate alternate modes of transportation. P -4A.04 Encourage development of low -carbon -impact transportation infrastructure. P -4A.05 Consider converting alleyways into attractive pedestrian zones for access to local businesses. Encourage alleyways for use as pedestrian zones. P -4A.06 Improve trails, sidewalks, streets, and public facilities to encourage walkability and non -motorized transportation. Goal G-4113 To improve circulation patterns across and within the community, and to achieve the desired urban design of the City. Policies P-46.01 Consider traffic flow modifications such as signalization, signing, parking restrictions, channelization, and one-way couplets before physical alterations are made to existing streets. P-46.02 Divert cross-town truck traffic around the downtown area. P-46.03 Facilitate the planning processes necessary for the development of an alternate local cross-town route with improvements that provide full access at US 101 and SR 117 (the Tumwater Truck Route). P-46.04 Strengthen the city's development regulations as necessary to preserve the right-of-way within an identified US 101 corridor P-46.05 Advocate a second crossing over White's Creek. 4.2 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan t �� P-46.06 Design and construct new arterial streets, local access streets, and alleys to conform to the most current editions of the Statewide National Functional Classification System for Federal Aid Systems, WSDOT, and Transportation Improvement Board minimum design standards and standards as adopted by the City. Permeable pavement is preferred for local access streets and alleys where feasible. P-46.07 Publicly dedicate street rights-of-way associated with the subdivision processing advance of the time of individual lot development in accordance with the Comprehensive Plan's Circulation Plan Map. P-46.08 Locate principal, minor, and collector arterial streets on the edge of district boundaries wherever possible. P-46.09 Ensure off-street parking should be sufficient and accessible within business and residential areas so the traffic flow of the street is not impaired. P-46.10 Police and fire protection should be a key factor in residential subdivision street designs and circulation patterns. P-46.11 Coordinate the development of the City's comprehensive service and facilities plan for streets, bikeways, pedestrian walkways, and the overall transportation system and regional transportation plans. P-46.12 Work with other jurisdictions to identify and protect a right-of-way for a second developed right of way P-46.13 Work with public and private transportation providers to provide greater access and opportunities to residents, including Sunday and holiday service. P-46.14 Consider potential environmental consequences, such as greenhouse - gas emissions and carbon footprints, when encouraging new commercial developments and businesses. Chapter 4 -Transportation Element 4.3 (This page intentionally left blank) Utilities & Public Services The Utilities and Public Services Element identifies and addresses the various services that make a community a safe and desirable place to live. It also establishes policies that define which services are the responsibility of the City to provide and which should be provided by the community as a whole. Taken together, the policy framework presented in this element will help Port Angeles realize many of its long-range goals - including sustaining the natural environment; supporting economic growth and opportunity; and helping keep services efficient and cost-effective. Actions related to Utilities and Public Services are included in Chapter 11, Implementation. M ■ Utilities Goals & Policies Goal G -5A To provide or allow the opportunity for services and facilities which enhance the quality of life for Port Angeles citizens of all ages, characteristics, needs, and interests and to achieve the desired urban design of the City. Policies P -5A.01 Include provisions in public facilities for citizens with disabilities and construct them according to accepted standards. P -5A.02 Locate social services providing home care in residential neighborhoods in a manner that maintains the character of the immediate neighborhood. P -5A.03 Comprehensive service and facility plans should be consistent with the City's Comprehensive Plan and should be implemented through applicable land use approvals and construction permits. P -5A.04 Encourage age-appropriate services for all -age groups. P -5A.05 Incorporate tribal issues and interests into city projects. Goal G-5113 To support services and facilities through different levels of participation in cooperation with other public or private agencies. Policies P-56.01 The City should be the "primary responsible agency" and should take the lead in cooperation with other governmental entities to provide: ■ Utility and emergency services (water, sewer, electrical, stormwater, police, fire and emergency medical response services) ■ Transportation infrastructure, including trails and sidewalks and ■ Parks and recreation P-56.02 The City should participate as a "financial partner" to support essential programs and services including: ■ Youth recreation programs and facilities ■ Library facilities ■ Senior programs ■ Low and moderate income housing programs ■ Facilities for senior programs ■ Utility assistance for low income households, and 5.3 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti ■ Social and public health services. P-56.03 As a "supporter," the City should promote and cooperate in providing programs and services including: ■ Library programs such as information and assistance ■ Affordable housing information and referral ■ Economic and business development services ■ Tourism information and services ■ Schools and community learning ■ Fine arts ■ Community recreation ■ Public and private youth, family and senior services ■ Telecommunications and ■ Crime prevention programs ■ Health Care programs. P-56.04 Develop and use public facilities cooperatively, in the promotion of social and community services. Goal G -5C To provide safe, clean, usable, and attractive public facilities which enhance the cultural, educational, economic, recreational, and environmental attributes of the City. Policies P -5C.01 Support industrial diversification by the development of urban services. P -5C.02 Major parks and large open spaces should provide for a variety of outdoor activities and be located to take advantage of natural processes (such as wetlands and tidal actions) and unusual landscape features (such as cliffs and bluffs), and to integrate stormwater facilities into the natural landscape where feasible (such as LID techniques and BMPs and stormwater treatment wetlands). P -5C.03 Provide a variety of settings and activities suitable to people of all ages, characteristics, and interests. P -5C.04 Encourage more active involvement and communication between education (professional and student), business, community, art and cultural communities to help integrate key people into the startup community. P -5C.05 Work in partnership with the community as stewards of the area's unique environment and quality of life. tI ►®— Chapter 5 - Utilities & Public Services Element 5.4 Goal G -51D To provide utility services in an efficient and cost-effective manner. Policies P-511).01 Design urban services for the maximum planned density and/or land use intensity of a given area as designated on the Comprehensive Plan Land Use Map. P-511).02 Provide urban services only in areas that are logical extensions of areas, which are currently served by such services or needed to implement a specific goal or policy of the Comprehensive Plan. P-511).03 Promote and encourage energy conservation, renewable energy, distributed energy generation, improved distribution efficiencies, and recycling efforts throughout the community. P-511).04 Promote the joint use of transportation rights-of-way and utility corridors for all forms of transportation, including non -motorized. P-511).05 Promote coordination, consistency, and concurrency at all stages of utility development in the Port Angeles Urban Growth Area. P-511).06 Planning for utility services should be consistent with the goals and policies of the Capital Facilities Element. P-511).07 Serve new development with sanitary sewers. P-511).08 Consider the policies adopted in the Water Resources Inventory Area 18 Watershed Management Plan, including the provision of water supply to the urban areas in and between the Elwha River and Morse Creek drainage basins. P-511).09 Provide infrastructure to all industrial lands to encourage development. P-511).10 Encourage the use of renewable energy in both the private and public sectors, providing all reasonable support and advocacy at the State level for regulations and incentives that encourage such installations. 0 5.5 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti Housing Le... The City recognizes the extreme importance of available clean, safe, and affordable housing in the community. The results of the 2006 study and public input provided during the 2016 update process, and 2019 Housing Action Plan influenced the development of the following goals, policies and objectives, which strive to achieve Port Angeles' long-range vision for housing. Beyond improving the quality, affordability, attainability, and availability of housing for residents, this element is seen to support community objectives related to economic development, downtown growth, neighborhood character, and service -efficient, more cost-effective development patterns. The Actions related to Housing are included in Chapter 11, Implementation. 0 Housing Goals & Policies Goal G -6A To improve the variety, quality, availability, and attainability of housing opportunities in the City of Port Angeles. Policies P -6A.01 Expand the residential land use options in the Zoning Code by classifying residential zones by allowed density rather than by housing types. P -6A.02 Allow residential uses in all non -industrial zones. In situations where a limited work/live environment is found to be compatible with an underlying industrial zoning, limited work/live environments may be deemed suitable when the living space is subordinate in nature to the industrial use component and the integrity and intent of the industrial zone is maintained. P -6A.03 Encourage the retention and development of safe and attractive mobile home parks. P -6A.04 Plan for sufficient urban services to support future housing in a variety of allowable densities. P -6A.05 Allow accessory residential units in single family residential zones. P -6A.06 Promote acceptance of low and moderate income housing. P -6A.07 Consider the effect of impact fees on the affordability of housing prior to establishing such impact fees. P -6A.08 In accordance with RCW 59.18.440 and .450, require State and Federal publicly assisted housing under current contracts who demolish, substantially rehabilitate, change the use of residential property, or remove use restrictions developments to provide relocation assistance to those tenants displaced as provided for in sections 49 and 50 of the Growth Management Act. P -6A.09 Work with the County to increase densities in some areas of the sparsely developed southwestern UGA along Lauridsen Boulevard from low density to medium density, consistent with the recently developed airport safety zones and FAA use recommendations. P -6A.10 Investigate the appropriate siting of additional land to be designated medium density and high density. P -6A.11 Provide an appropriate balance between attainable market -rate housing and affordable housing and ensure that affordable housing is provided in a way that contributes to the physical appearance and economic and social health of the neighborhoods and the City. P -6A.12 Encourage the use of Green Building techniques for new developments and support Green Built certification for new developments. 6.2 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti P -6A.13 Encourage the use of Low Impact Development stormwater management techniques (such as vegetated roofs, permeable pavement, and bio - retention) for all new developments. P -6A.14 Allow for mixed-use opportunities in neighborhoods, including commercial development and mix of housing densities. P -6A.15 Identify opportunities for housing revitalization in targeted areas including the downtown core. P -6A.16 Promote and increase the number of downtown residential living units. P -6A.17 Develop strategies to combat homelessness and housing insecurity amongst residents. P -6A.18 Develop and implement tools to support a range of housing types including affordable housing options. Goal G-6113 To participate with Clallam County and other entities in programs to increase the availability and affordability of public assisted housing and rental units as well as other affordable housing opportunities. Policies P-66.01 Participate in a county -wide housing task force comprised of representatives from government, financial institutions, business, construction, real estate, non-profit housing entities, and other citizens interested in housing issues. A major goal of the task force should be coordinating efforts to provide affordable housing, encouraging rapid review of low and moderate income housing projects throughout the County, and promoting public education and awareness regarding the need for and nature of affordable housing. P-66.02 Cooperate with the county -wide housing task force and other agencies in assembling packages of publicly owned land, which could be used for low and moderate income housing and for shelter or transitional housing. P-66.03 Cooperate with the County to promote innovative housing techniques and explore creative regulatory programs for the purpose of creating and preserving existing affordable housing opportunities. P-66.04 P-66.04 Invite the Peninsula Housing Authority to participate in a variety of affordable housing opportunities and seek representation on the Peninsula Housing Authority and non-profit housing organizations. P-66.05 Provide adequate low and moderate income housing opportunities within the Port Angeles Planning Area. P-66.06 Support affordable housing by developing utility cost savings programs and the provision of transitional and temporary housing for the homeless and/or displaced families. Chapter 6 - Housing Element �i 6.3 P-66.07 Designate specific medium and high density zones where increased building height limitations could be increased. Goal G -6C To use the 2019 Housing Action Plan as a guide and implementation tool for future City actions in support of providing available State supported financing options, municipal code revisions that promote innovative housing products and designs, incentive zoning, and renovation/rehabilitation of existing of the City's housing stock. Policies P -6C.01 Encourage innovative housing development based on Port Angeles' forecasted demographic changes. P -6C.02 Designate timelines for planning actions that adequately address housing needs within the City and unincorporated UGA. P -6C.03 Promote housing renovation and rehabilitation. P -6C.04 Incentivize the provision of non-cash density offsets to assist in the development of affordable housing options. P -6C.05 Encourage the partnership and coordination of the City of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Peninsula Housing Authority, Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, other local public agencies, and North Peninsula Builders Association to continue focusing on solving issues with the developed and provision of attainable housing on the North Olympic Peninsula. P -6C.06 Encourage the issuance of annual and periodic updates to the Housing Action Plan. P -6C.07 Develop measureable standards to assess the progress and implementation of the core recommendations of the Housing Action Plan. 11 6.4 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan 0 Conservation The Conservation Element establishes the importance of quality of life to the people of Port Angeles. A clean, healthy, and diverse natural environment along with a variety of historical and cultural amenities are critical elements of a high quality community. As with other elements, this chapter provides a goal, policy and action framework to support Port Angeles' long-range vision related to conservation. This includes efforts to optimize the city's relationship with its natural historic, and cultural setting by protecting and enhancing the environment and identifying and conserving sire and entities of historic or cultural significance. Actions related to conservation goals and policies are included in Chapter 11, Implementation. 0 Conservation Goals & Policies Goal G -7A To promote sustainable development and land use that is compatible with the overall natural environment, historical, archaeological, and cultural amenities. Policies P -7A.01 Require all development, including the location and design of all structures and open space areas, to be compatible with the unique physical features and natural amenities of the land and complement the environment in which it is placed, while recognizing the rights of private ownership. P -7A.02 Promote compatibility between the land and its use by regulating the intensity of the land use. P -7A.03 Adopt development criteria, which promote the use of innovative design techniques to provide for the use of the land in a manner compatible with any unique physical features or valuable natural, historical, and/or cultural amenities. P -7A.04 Building density should decrease as natural constraints increase. P -7A.05 Establish minimum standards for development of properties, which contain or adjoin critical areas for the purpose of protecting such areas and enhancing their natural functions. P -7A.06 Regulate site design, preparation, and development to avoid or minimize damage to wetlands and other environmentally sensitive areas. P -7A.07 Use regionally consistent requirements for industrial and commercial sewer discharge pretreatment and require new indirect dischargers to locate where appropriate sewer service can be made available. P -7A.08 Designate open space areas to preserve major or unique physical features, to serve as natural greenbelts and wildlife corridors, and to establish an urban edge to the PAUGA. P -7A.09 Coordinate its environmental regulations with County, State, and Federal regulations to simplify the permitting process and to reduce associated costs to the land user. P -7A.10 Review all new development for impacts on climate change and adaptation to sea level rise. P -7A.11 Implement site-specific requirements for individual development proposals to mitigate any negative impacts created by the development, particularly to an area identified as an environmentally sensitive area. 7.2 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti Goal G-7113 To protect and enhance the area's unique physical features, its natural, historical, archaeological, and cultural amenities, and the overall environment. Policies P-76.01 Maintain and preserve the City's unique physical features and natural amenities, such as creeks, streams, lakes, ponds, wetlands, ravines, bluffs, shorelines, and fish and wildlife habitats. P-76.02 Promote and highlight Port Angeles' plentiful natural beauty, amenities and cultural history. P-76.03 Recognizing the functions and values of wetlands, the City should strive to achieve no net loss of wetlands. P-76.04 Preserve uniquely featured lands, which still exist in their natural states and which are notable for their aesthetic, scenic, historic, or ecological features. Prohibit any private or public development, which would destroy such qualities, or would subject features to damage from climatic change, while recognizing the rights of private ownership. P-76.05 Enhance and preserve the quality of the City's air and water as two of its unique physical features. P-76.06 Protect air and water quality by minimizing pollution from new and existing sources including climatic change impacts. P-76.07 Develop and implement a plan to improve water quality, which includes measures to reduce and minimize stormwater pollutants and combined sewer overflow pollutant discharges. P-76.08 Maintain and enhance the quality of water resources through the regulation of clearing, grading, dumping, discharging, and draining and the provision of flood and erosion control measures and regulations to protect wetlands and other environmentally sensitive areas. P-76.09 Protect water quality and prevent erosion through the retention of existing vegetation. P-76.10 Encourage identification, preservation, and restoration of sites and structures that have historical or cultural significance. P-76.11 Give precedence to long-term environmental impacts and benefits over short-term environmental impacts and benefits. P-76.12 Promote and utilize environment enhancing conservation practices. Those practices may include waste reduction, use of energy efficient and conserving materials, and energy conservation techniques and should also encourage the development and use of alternative forms of energy and transportation. Chapter 7 - Conservation Element 7.3 P-76.13 Reference the most recently adopted Washington State Citations of Recommended Sources of Best Available Science for Designating and Protecting Critical Areas and other research identified as more locally appropriate and applicable when available as Best Available Science in the Critical Areas Ordinance. P-76.14 Avoid adverse impacts to archaeological sites by following and requiring best management practices for archaeological preservation. P-76.15 Publicly recognize the many values provided by trees in an urban setting and identify opportunities to plant trees. P-76.16 Establish and implement an urban tree management program intended to retain and/or restore the overall tree canopy in the city by using plant materials as a unifying element and tool to protect the health, safety and welfare of the public, using the environmental services provided by trees to mitigate the negative effects of impervious surfaces and vehicular traffic such as increased temperatures, airborne particulates, carbon dioxide, nose, and stormwater runoff. P-76.17 Plant trees along residential streets, in parking lots, and in other areas as opportunities arise. Trees should be retained whenever possible and maintained using Best Management Practices as appropriate for each tree type. P-76.18 Seek strategies and technologies which reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by city facilities and operations. P-76.19 Promote the use of alternative energy, energy conservation technology, and smart energy grid. Goal G -7C To promote community awareness and education of the importance and responsible use of our environmental, historical, and cultural amenities, with a focus on minimally impacting these resources. Policies P -7C.01 Inform the public concerning the long-term benefits of protecting and improving the quality of the region's air, land, and water. P -7C.02 Encourage the development and implementation of environmental, historical, and cultural awareness programs which focus on local and regional issues, including climate change impacts and preparedness. 7.4 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti Goal G -71D To preserve and enhance the City's shoreline, its natural vegetation and wildlife and to mitigate for present and planned impacts in a manner consistent with the State Shoreline Management Act and the City's Shoreline Master Program. Policies P -7D.01 Preserve shoreline areas for future generations by restricting or prohibiting development that would interfere with the shoreline ecology or irretrievably damage shoreline resources. P -7D.02 Maintain and restore riparian vegetation in shoreline areas and on tributary streams, which affect shoreline resources wherever possible. P -7D.03 Employ techniques to rehabilitate degraded shorelines for the purpose of shoreline stabilization and habitat enhancement wherever possible. P -7D.04 Preserve and protect aquatic habitats including shellfish habitat, and important marine vegetation should be wherever possible. P -7D.05 Development patterns and densities on lands adjacent to shorelines should be compatible with shoreline uses and resources and reinforce the policies of the Shoreline Management Act and the City's Shoreline Master Program. P -7D.06 Utilize common utility corridors for urban service facilities located in shoreline areas. P -7D.07 Designate an adequate shoreline area for water -oriented commercial and industrial development based on the Land Use Element. P -7D.08 Locate shoreline uses and activities to avoid environmentally sensitive and ecologically valuable areas and to insure the preservation and protection of shoreline natural areas and resources. P -7D.09 Locate utility facilities and rights-of-way outside of the shoreline area wherever possible, and if unavoidable, protect shoreline ecology and resources. 0 Chapter 7 - Conservation Element 7.5 �i (This page intentionally left blank) 7 Capital Facilities � The Capital Facilities Element consists of two parts. The first part is the listing of goals and policies regarding the City's provision of urban services and its planning of capital improvements. The second part is the Annual Capital Facilities Plan which is adopted separately from the Comprehensive Plan but is included as part of the plan as an attachment. The Comprehensive Plan defines urban services in its definition section, which includes a listing of the following services and facilities, which should be available in an urban environment: • Surface transportation facilities • Water facilities • Sewer facilities • Stormwater facilities • Solid waste facilities • Parks and recreational facilities • Emergency services (police, fire and medical response) Public Facilities within the City of Port Angeles managed by outside agencies: Public schools facilities Regional facilities (libraries, corrections, and mass transit). The following goals and policies provide guidance on how these services and facilities should be provided. This includes the establishment of minimum levels of service standards for each service. The policies also call for the development of individual comprehensive service and facility plans which take an in-depth look at the current status of each service and the projected future demand for each service and which include a financial feasibility analysis on the costs of providing each service. The Capital Facilities Plan is a six-year plan, which establishes how, where, and when the City will develop the facilities necessary to provide its various services. 8.2 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti ■ Capital Facilities Goals & Policies Goal G -8A To provide and maintain safe and financially feasible urban services and capital facilities at or above stated levels of service to all City residents and the general public. Policies P -8A.01 The Comprehensive Plan should establish general level of service standards for each urban utility and service. Such standards should be used to determine the impacts of development. P -8A.02 Develop individual comprehensive service and facility plans for the following capital facilities and/or services: ■ Transportation, including streets, and non -motorized (bikeways and pedestrian walkways), ■ Water system, ■ Sanitary sewer system, ■ Electrical system, ■ Parks and recreation services, and ■ Emergency services (police, fire, and medical response). P -8A.03 Each comprehensive service and facility plan should be consistent with the Comprehensive Plan, the County -Wide Planning Policy, and the State Growth Management Act. P -8A.04 At a minimum, ensure the continuation of established level of service standards for all urban utilities and services to the extent and in the manner provided herein. P -8A.05 Cooperate with the appropriate private and/or public agencies to develop individual comprehensive service and facility plans for each of the following utilities and/or services: ■ Telecommunications, ■ Schools, ■ Mass transportation, and ■ Solid waste collection and disposal. P -8A.06 Create and maintain comprehensive service and facility plans consistent with the general level of service standards established in the Comprehensive Plan and establish detailed level of service standards which, at a minimum, meet all local, state and federal health and safety requirements. Chapter 8 - Capital Facilities Element 8.3 �i Establish desired level of service standards and should include an inventory of current facilities, measurements of current and future service capacities, the determination of future service and facility improvements necessary to serve the twenty-year vision of the Comprehensive Plan Land Use Map, and a financial feasibility analysis. P -8A.07 Create and maintain comprehensive service and facility plan for streets and non- motorized facilities (bikeways, trails, and pedestrian walkways) that include specific actions and requirements for bringing into compliance any street facilities that fall below the required level of service, including demand management strategies which encourage reduced reliance on single occupant vehicle trips and encourage use of alternate modes of transportation such as the bicycles, walkways, and transit riding with incentive programs for and from local businesses. Include a future US 101 corridor to meet long- term local and regional non -motorized transportation needs. P -8A.08 The City should require concurrency and standards be met at the time of new development for the following utilities and services: ■ Paved streets, curbs, and sidewalks ■ Water service, ■ Sanitary sewer service, ■ Electrical service ■ Solid waste collection, ■ Stormwater management, ■ Telecommunications services, and ■ Emergency services (police, fire and emergency medical response). P -8A.09 Require the following services and facilities within six years from the time of development: ■ Parks and recreation services and facilities, and ■ Transit system. P -8A.10 Adopt an annual Capital Facilities Plan consistent with the Comprehensive Plan and State Growth Management Act. The Capital Facilities Plan's financing schedule may be corrected, updated, or modified without being considered as an amendment to the Comprehensive Plan, following a public hearing before the City Council. P -8A.11 Adopt a Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Plan consistent with the Comprehensive Plan and the Growth Management Act as an Element of the Comprehensive Plan. P -8A.12 Require sidewalks be included in all development and redevelopment proposals where sidewalks do not exist at the time of application for development. Permeable materials are preferred for sidewalk construction where feasible. 8.4 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti P -8A.13 Develop and implement an Urban Forestry Program to properly manage street trees, park trees, and forested environmentally sensitive areas located within the City. P -8A.14 Create a unified, coherent design element for signage, street lighting, traffic control devices, and similar structures to be used throughout the City and specifically in the downtown area as a method for improved way finding and place identification for visitors and residents alike. P -8A.15 Consider climatic change impacts and adaptation strategies in planning and designing capital facilities. P -8A.16 Development shall be served with adequate transit service as determined in the comprehensive service and facilities plan for transportation within six years from the time of development. P -8A.17 Deny any development that will not be served at or greater than a citywide level of service standard of 10 acres of parks per 1,000 population within six years from the time of development. P -8A.18 Deny any development that will not be served at or less than the following level of service standards at the time of development. ■ Police 600 persons per one officer ■ Fire Four -minute response time or residential sprinkler system installation P -8A.19 Deny any development that will not be served with solid waste collection service at or less than a city-wide level of service standard of 400 pick- up accounts per 1000 population within six years from the time of development. P -8A.20 Participate with the County in the development, maintenance, and implementation of a regional solid waste plan, which addresses collection, disposal, and recycling of solid waste. P -8A.21 Consider the cumulative effect of development on the City's need for adequate public service buildings. P -8A.22 Consider projected climatic change impacts and adaptation strategies to determine whether adequate services can be provided into the future, prior to approving any development. P -8A.23 Support public education and Peninsula College, including initiatives for rebuilding schools. P -8A.24 Consider level of service standards for development based on the School District's projected enrollment figures and residential growth as provided for in the Land Use Element of the Comprehensive Plan: ■ High School 125 square feet of permanent, appropriate educational space per student ■ Middle School 104 square feet of permanent, appropriate educational space per student ■ Elementary School 100 square feet of permanent, appropriate educational space per student Chapter 8 - Capital Facilities Element 8.5 �i City shall not approve any development that is not served with water service at or greater than the following level of service standards at the time of development Goal G-8113 To provide urban streets and utilities at minimum levels of service for all city residents and the general public. Policies P-86.01 All arterial streets shall function at an average daily Level of Service (LOS) of D or better. P-86.02 Development on all arterial streets and any other streets identified as school walking routes should include pedestrian sidewalks on both sides of the street. P-86.03 The City shall not approve any development that is not served with water service at or greater than the following level of service standards at the time of development: ■ Single family units: 2 gallons per minute @ 30 psi (Fire - 1000 gallons per minute @ 20 psi for single family residential > 3,600 square feet) (Fire - 500 gallons per minute @ 20 psi for single family residential < 3,600 square feet) ■ Multifamily units: 1 gallon per minute @ 30 psi (fire per Uniform Fire Code) ■ Commercial: per Uniform Fire Code ■ Industrial: per Uniform Fire Code P-86.04 The City shall not approve any development that is not served with sewer service at or greater than a level of service standard of 300 gallons per day per person at the time of development. P-86.05 The City shall not approve any development that is not served with electrical service at or greater than a level of service standard of 118 volts (120 volt base) at the time of development. P-86.06 The City shall not approve any development that increases a site's post - development stormwater run-off beyond that allowed by the Department of Ecology Stormwater Management Manual for Western Washington as adopted by the City. 8.6 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti P-86.07 The City should not approve any development that cannot be served with telecommunications service at or greater than the following level of service standards at the time of development: Telephone Residential 1 service per unit Commercial 1 service per business Industrial 1 service per business Cable Television Residential 1 service per unit Commercial 0 service per business Industrial 0 service per business Internet Residential 1 service per unit Commercial 0 service per business Industrial 0 service per business P-86.08 Highways of Statewide Significance (HSS) should function at Level of Service (LOS) D or better, consistent with the Regional Transportation Plan (RTP). P-86.09 Develop a Capital Facilities Plan list, with public input, for prioritizing pedestrian walkway needs. P-86.10 Seek funding to increase the provision of sidewalks in already developed areas where sidewalks do not occur. Goal G -8C To participate with the County, State, and Federal governments as well as other public agencies to provide adequate regional public services such as schools, highways, tie-ins to regional communication networks, libraries, and correctional facilities. Policies P -8C.01 The City should cooperate with the County and the community's health care providers to ensure quality health care facilities within the City that serve the region as a whole. P -8C.02 The City should cooperate with the County in planning regional library facilities within the City. P -8C.03 The City should cooperate with the County in planning for adequate correctional facilities. tI Chapter 8 - Capital Facilities Element 8.7 P -8C.04 Essential public facilities of a county -wide or statewide nature must meet existing state laws and regulations requiring specific siting and permit requirements consistent with the City's Comprehensive Plan. Goal G-811) To reduce the amount of impervious surface created by new developments and thereby reduce stormwater management costs and environmental impacts to the City and its natural resources, reduce development costs to private property owners, and provide safe and more attractive streets through traffic calming, safe pedestrian amenities, and improved street edge landscaping. Policies P -81D.01 Revise existing urban development standards in low density residential areas to include low impact development standards for street, pedestrian and non - motorized access, sewer, and fire suppression to more nearly reflect the needs of suburban densities and conditions in outlying undeveloped areas of the City and PAUGA. P -811D.02 The City should invest in Green Infrastructure, Low Impact Development (LID), and similar technologies to maintain and enhance environmental quality. 0 8.8 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti Economic I 41 Development The intent of the Economic Development ElementMW__ is to guide decision-making and investments that s diversify and strengthen the local economy. Optimizing the city's relationship with its natural setting • Supporting safe, attractive and character -rich neighborhoods • Creating a more dynamic, successful I downtown • Improving Port Angeles' standing as a regional hub for business and Port -related enterprises. • Recognizing and supporting the economic impact of the college, Homeland Security, and Department of Defense presence. 0 Economic Development Goals & Policies Goal G -9A To create and maintain a balanced and stable local economy with full employment and emphasis on strengthening the community's traditional natural resource related industries as well as diversifying the overall economic base. Policies P -9A.01 Remain a major economic center on the North Olympic Peninsula, meeting regional and local needs. P -9A.02 Promote long-term economic stability by encouraging businesses and industries to invest in modernization and environmentally sound technology. P -9A.03 Promote the diversification of the community's economic base by encouraging the location, retention, and expansion of local small and medium sized businesses. P -9A.04 Promote the "traditional downtown feeling" of retail, dining, arts, culture, and entertainment oriented activities that are attractive to both tourists and local residents. P -9A.05 Develop sufficient utilities, improve traffic circulation, and identify environmental constraints in the airport industrial area in cooperation with other governmental agencies. P -9A.06 Encourage training and educational opportunities, which strengthen and increase the variety of skills available in the work force. P -9A.07 Promote the motivation and availability of the community's work force as a major economic development strength. P -9A.08 Encourage inter -jurisdictional discussion and cooperation with other governmental agencies to foster the economic development of the region and provide opportunities for civic cooperation by coordinating and supporting local non -profits, associations, and community service organizations to support economic development. P -9A.09 Work with other community organizations in developing an effective business assistance program directed toward the commercial business owner. P -9A.10 Support continued development of a strong marine related industry in the Port Angeles Harbor. P -9A.11 Promote the sustainability of the existing art and culture industry encouraging community participation and involvement. Enhancement of the creative economy contributes to the overall health of the community. P -9A.12 Encourage businesses with low carbon footprints. 9.2 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti P -9A.13 Consider projected climatic change impacts and adaptation strategies when encouraging new businesses to establish in Port Angeles. P -9A.14 Develop and economy which provides opportunities for Port Angeles' vulnerable and at -risk community members. P -9A.15 Invest in training and education for local residents, by providing access to state-of-the-art technology and training opportunities. P -9A.16 Encourage and incentivize youth entrepreneurship as well as jobs and businesses that attract young families. P -9A.17 Attract and retain businesses and industries which create family wage jobs for local residents. P -9A.18 Prioritize the airport as major economic asset and identify specific incentives to attract commercial services. P -9A.19 Encourage the location and support for adequate venues for community meetings, shows, music art, hobby and user groups, and professional and business meetings and particularly supporting the location of low-cost places where people (especially young people) can congregate and talk, and ensure that these have up-to-date communication facilities. P -9A.20 Recognize art, architecture, music, and performance as important community resources and continue to encourage and support cultural activities. P -9A.21 Support decorating public spaces with more art from the community. P -9A.22 Encourage the design of public spaces that encourage people to interact. P -9A.23 Support the concept and encourage the establishment of Maker's Spaces. (See definition) Public spaces where people make things and collaborate on projects, spaces are usually equipped with tools, 3-D printers, computers, design software, art and craft tools and supplies. Goal G-9113 To have a healthy local economy that co -exists with the community's high quality of life through the protection, enhancement, and use of the community's natural, historical, and cultural amenities. Policies P-96.01 Promote the region's high quality environment and available natural and cultural resources as factors in attracting and retaining business, industry, and individual enterprises. P-96.02 Promote the community's quality public school system and its diversity of other educational opportunities as factors in attracting and retaining business and industry. Chapter 9 - Economic Development Element 9.3 �i P-96.03 Encourage the enhancement of the existing four-year community college through such means as the expansion of its technical curriculum and additional four year degree opportunities. P-96.04 Promote development of planned office, business, and industrial parks, while conserving unique physical features of the land and maintaining compatibility with other land uses in the surrounding area. P-96.05 Encourage the availability of housing that meets the needs of the entire spectrum of the community's residents. P-96.06 Recognize, preserve and promote its historic and cultural properties as a measure of its quality of life. P-96.07 Support landscaping and detailing of the streetscape at the City's east and west entries. P-96.08 Utilize the Climatic Change Preparedness Plan in attracting businesses, to demonstrate a proactive approach to climatic change in the area. P-96.09 Encourage and pursue economic development with positive environmental consequences, including non-polluting industries eco -friendly business, and low carbon footprints. Goal G -9C To create and promote a strong tourism industry for Port Angeles, as well as to recognize and support existing and prospective tourism attractions. Policies P -9C.01 Support improved access to the Olympic National Park, particularly to Hurricane Ridge. P -9C.02 Work to enhance the public use of Ediz Hook. P -9C.03 Take a leading role in enhancing visitors' first impression of the community by maintaining and upgrading the City's public facilities, green infrastructure, and strengthen the nuisance abatement program. P -9C.04 Support development of an electric vehicle (EV) charging station network and EV maintenance facilities around the Olympic Peninsula. P -9C.05 Support tourism and recreation activities which highlights Port Angeles' natural, cultural and historical amenities. Goal G-911) To strengthen and enhance the restoration and reinvigoration of our downtown historic buildings, infrastructure improvements, and beautification projects. 9.4 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti Policies P-911).01 Consider best available science on sea level rise and recommended mitigation and adaptation strategies in the development of downtown. 0 Chapter 9 - Economic Development Element 9.5 �i (This page is intentionally left blank) 10.1 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan t �� Parks & N k�l Recreation The intent of the Park Element is to provide a guide for the development and management of City parks in Port Angeles. The goal and policy framework that follow provide direction in realizing Port Angeles' vision regarding parks and recreation - including: • Optimizing the city's relationship with its remarkable natural setting • Supporting a wide range of recreational opportunities available to all • Creating vibrant, well -valued neighborhoods with access to parks, trails and natural areas • Sustaining Port Angeles' rich arts and cultural heritage and overall sense of community. 0 Parks & Recreation Goals & Policies Goal G -10A To acquire, develop, renovate and maintain a sustainable system of parks, recreational facilities, and open spaces to ensure that the contributions of natural resources and recreation to human well- being are maintained and recognized as a value. Policies P -10A.01 Provide Port Angeles with a diversity of open spaces, parks, and recreation facilities and programs appropriately distributed throughout the City. P -10A.02 Ensure that equality is achieved to the extent possible in the types and variety of facilities, quality of maintenance, and the range of recreation services provided. P -10A.03 Retain and reflect the natural beauty that attracts visitors, business, and residents to the area. P -10A.04 Forge effective partnerships and strengthen ties with other public, private, and non-profit providers including providing high quality recreational opportunities. P -10A.05 Identify waterfront improvements to increase marine transportation and recreation. P -10A.06 Identify appropriate locations for small (pocket) parks, community gardens and food forests throughout the community and integrate them into its Parks system. P -10A.07 The City should continue to provide or participate with private sponsors to provide high quality recreational opportunities. P -10A.08 Continue to participate as a partner in the extension of the Olympic Discovery Trail through the City to the western City limits. Goal G -10B To enhance the quality of life in the community by providing facilities, services, and programs that offer positive opportunities for building healthy, safe, and productive lives to the broadest segment of the population. Policies P-106.01 Provide consistently high-quality recreational experiences to residents and visitors through a wide variety of park types and features. 10.3 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti P-106.02 Strive for excellence through efficient, accurate, and skillful performance in every process, service and product delivered by the Parks and Recreation providers. P-106.03 Keep citizens involved and informed about parks and recreation issues, services, and family friendly features and amenities. P-106.04 Manage park facilities in a manner that will ensure public safety, identify family friendly features and amenities, and keep the parks free of misuse to the greatest extent possible and resulting in a sustainable and resilient park system. P-106.05 Incorporate health and nutrition into parks and recreation programming. P-106.06 Provide high quality services, emphasize the design of park areas to reduce long-term maintenance and operating costs, and implement improved technology to conserve limited resources such as water, power and people. P-106.07 Provide programs and opportunities that are sensitive to the needs of all of its citizens, including those with limited financial resources, disadvantaged youth, the elderly, the disabled, and those with other special needs. Goal G -10C To establish and protect a visual character of the community through open spaces, streetscapes, borrowed landscapes, and publicly -owned natural resource areas. Policies P -10C.01 Strive to protect and retain the natural beauty of the area. P -10C.02 Supplement and enhance the visual attractiveness of the city through the use of formal landscaping in street medians, city entryways, and along sidewalks, as well as the use of other public spaces, flower beds, and street trees. Emphasize use of planter strips with drought tolerant vegetation and bio -retention facilities. Goal G -10D To promote economic growth through recreational tourism and attract visitors and new business by enhancing the image of the community through beautification and recreation programs. Policies P -10D.01 To encourage efficient transportation systems, support the use of shuttle services during events to move participants between venues. Chapter 10 - Parks & Recreation Element 10.4 tIMP, Goal G -10E To provide a system of walking trails and bicycle paths to complement and coordinate with the existing street system and provide recreational opportunities and physical activity while reducing the dependence on traditional automobile transportation. Policies P -10E.01 The City should continue efforts to improve or provide access to Valley, Tumwater, Peabody, Ennis and White's Creeks through the development of an integrated trails system. 0 10.5 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan t �� 4L 'AY* "' t�"�� Implementation MI)k L_,A .. The following pages (Table 11.01) list a series of actions supporting the goals and policies contained in this plan's elements, showcasing a range of undertakings identified to implement the community's long-range vision. These actions constitute a part of the corresponding elements. It is provided to help City staff and leadership track progress, coordinate and combine various actions where it makes sense to do so, and to help guide budgeting of work and improvements in a more realistic, strategic fashion. As with the rest of the plan, this table represents the input, expressed priorities and values of the community and its leadership. Each listing includes columns identifying the anticipated timing of that action, as well as those primary agencies likely to be involved. These columns in no way obligate the City or identified partners to act or participate according to the timeframes described - rather, the table offers a means for the community to see, at a glance, its stated objectives in context of an intended timeframe. A 2019 Comprehensive Plan amendment identified policies that were specific or action oriented enough to justify placement into Chapter 11 Table 11.01 as actions. These former policies have been placed under each associated element in this chapter and identified by a placeholder number XX. A future Comprehensive Plan Amendment or Update will include the full evaluation of each proposed action for language, intent, timeline, partners and given a formal number. Li � ,,` . }_. .� (This page intentionally left blank) Measurable Actions Number Action C= Complete O= Ongoing N = Not Complete Short Medium Long �a U 9 Y Action / Deliverable (0-2 yr.) (2-4 yr.) (4+ yr.) OU U Oa _J Other Metric Date Complete Growth Management Act A-2.01 Periodically update the City's comprehensive • Ordinance June 30, 2024 0 plan as required by Washington State's Growth Passed Management Act (GMA). A-2.02 Review and update the City's Buildable Lands • Matrix December 21, 0 Inventory on a biannual basis, helping inform Produced 2018 land use decision-making. A-2.03 Acquire no -protest annexation agreements • • Number N/A 0 for all utility connections occurring in the Port Agreements Angeles Urban Growth Area (PAUGA). A-2.04 Recommend expansion of the southwestern • • Parcel mapped December 31, 0 Urban Growth Area (UGA) to include twelve within UGA 2019 parcels located in an area bounded on the north by US 101; on the east by Old Joe Road (the western City limits at that location); on the west by the existing UGA boundary, and on the south by a line parallel to Old Joe Road right-of- way extended west to the UGA boundary. Also to be included are parcels 063017230050 and 063018120210. Land Use A-3.01 Review and revise City development regulations • Ordinance December 31, 0 for consistency with each major update of the Passed 2024 Comprehensive Plan. A-3.02 Continue to develop programs encouraging • PADA Farmers Number of N/A 0 the use of downtown for community events, Market New Events gatherings, displays, and public markets.. A-3.03 Research and develop a program for • North Olympic Ordinance December 31, N consideration addressing approaches to open Land Trust Passed 2020 space preservation, including: • Land banking • Transfer of Development Rights (TDR) • Purchase of Development Rights (PDR). Abbreviations: COPA =City of Port Angeles; CLC = Clallam County; POPA =Port of Port Angeles; LEKT = Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe; WSDOT - Washington State Department of Transportation; WA DAHP = Washington State Department of Archeology and Historic Preservation; WA DOE = Washington State Department of Ecology; SP = City of Port Angeles Strategic Plan 2017-2018; AIA = American Institute of Architects City of Port Angeles Measurable Actions Number Action C= Complete O= Ongoing N = Not Complete Short Medium Long Ma U 0. x Action / Deliverable (0-2 yr.) (2-4 yr.) (4+ yr.) OU U 0. Other Metric Date Complete A-3.04 Review and update the City's Urban Services • Number of December 31, 0 Standards and Guidelines to provide for trail Miles 2021 development of low -impact trails in designated Completed open spaces, including permeable materials where feasible. A-3.05 Adjust zoning to protect the prime commercial • Ordinance December 31, C (S P) corridor Passed 2017 A-3.06 Rewrite sign code (less clutter, more character) • Ordinance December 31, N (S P) Passed 2019 A-3.07 Consider adoption of an overlay district for • Budget for December 31, N (AIA) downtown to respond to sign, design, and Form Based 2018 parking issues. Code Transportation A-4.01 Design and develop the following segments of • • • Peninsula 100% May 31, 0 the Olympic Discovery Trail: Trails Design 2019 • Marine Drive to 10th Street Coalition Grant December • City Pier along Railroad Avenue to Laurel Obtained 31, 2018 Street Number December • Other segments as funding and opportunity of Miles 31, 2021 provide, coordinated with the City's park, Complete street and trail systems. A-4.02 Identify funding and implementation strategies • • Washington Grant December 21, N for the Valley Creek Loop Trail, connecting the State Parks Obtained 2020 Valley and Peabody Creek corridors with the Foothills Trail system. A-4.03 Review and update the City's Urban Services • Clallam Biannual December 31, 0 Standards and Guidelines, including direction for Transit Review 2018 transportation facility improvements that: Complete • Include including bike path development and maintenance, signage, and storage • Assess cost/benefits of bicycle -friendly infrastructure. Abbreviations: COPA = City of Port Angeles; CLC = Clallam County; POPA = Port of Port Angeles; LEKT = Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe; WSDOT - Washington State Department of Transportation; WA DAHP = Washington State Department of Archeology and Historic Preservation; WA DOE = Washington State Department of Ecology; SP = City of Port Angeles Strategic Plan 2017-2018; AIA = American Institute of Architects C ro r1 O) C O) t O) L Q E O U V) O) O) dA C Q L O a- 4- 0 - 4— O .M c -I c -I F� F� Ln Measurable Actions Number Action C= Complete O= Ongoing N = Not Complete Short Medium Long 0< Qa Y Action / Deliverable (0-2 yr.) (2-4 yr.) (4+ yr.) OU U CL Other Metric Date Complete A-4.04 Review and update the City's Urban Services • Biannual December 31, 0 Standards and Guidelines, encouraging public Review 2020 streetscape improvements including: Complete • Street trees • Art and creative community -oriented beautification efforts • Pedestrian and bicycle amenities • Sidewalks on both sides of streets. A-4.05 Review and update the City's Urban Services • Biannual December 31, 0 Standards and Guidelines, helping: Review 2020 • Promote joint access and maintenance of Complete driveways • Balance the needs for traffic movement and access to properties immediately adjacent to secondary and primary arterials. A-4.06 Develop a "Complete Streets" program for • Ordinance December 31, C Port Angeles, helping identified travelways Passed 2018 accommodate all modes of transportation as appropriate for the needs and conditions of each neighborhood or district. A-4.07 Prepare a study evaluating options for easterly • WSDOT Completed December 31, N access across Whites and Ennis Creeks in the Report / Study 2020 vicinity of Golf Course Road. A-4.08 In coordination with the County, RTPO and state • • WSDOT; Completed December 31, N and federal agencies, study a future US 101 Clallam Report / Study 2020 corridor alignment including evaluation of the Transit Heart of the Hills Parkway and Coastal Corridor concepts. (Route along Lauridsen Boulevard east of Race Street will not be considered.) A-4.09 Plan and integrate the following into the Capital • Program as a December 31, N Facilities Plan: CFP Item 2018 • Multi -modal street improvements along Edgewood Drive (south side of the airport), Lauridsen Boulevard, Airport Road (west side of the airport), and along Milwaukee Drive to Lower Elwha Road. A-4.10 Review and assess progress per AIA Urban • Status Report December 31, 0 (S P) Design Study; consider proposals to transform 2019 First and Front Streets Abbreviations: COPA = City of Port Angeles; CLC = Clallam County; POPA =Port of Port Angeles; LEKT = Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe; WSDOT - Washington State Department of Transportation; WA DAHP = Washington State Department of Archeology and Historic Preservation; WA DOE = Washington State Department of Ecology; SP = City of Port Angeles Strategic Plan 2017-2018; AIA = American Institute of Architects Measurable Actions Number Action C= Complete O= Ongoing N = Not Complete Short Medium Long Ma 0. Y Action / Deliverable (0-2 yr.) (2-4 yr.) (4+ yr.) OU U Oa _J Other Metric Date Complete A-4.11 Transportation Benefit District on ballot • Ballot Measure August 31, C (S P) 2017 Housing A-6.01 Identify appropriate areas of the city for • List / Map December 31, 0 higher -density housing, converting low-density Areas for 2019 residential areas into medium and high-density Upzone designations. A-6.02 Evaluate revisions to height limitations in all • Ordinance December 31, 0 commercial, medium, and high-density zones, Passed 2020 helping accommodate increased residential densities without impacting viewsheds. A-6.03 Align Municipal Code for high density • Amending March 31, 0 (S P) development zones. Ordinance 2017 Passed A-6.04 Partner with the Port Angeles Downtown • PADA List / Map March 31, C (S P) Association to promote 2nd Story and above Available 2018 residential occupancy downtown A-6.05 Pursue partnership for a demonstration project Resolution December 31, N (HAP) that will provide: Passed/Project 2022 • A catalytic mixed-use project with affordable identified units. • A demonstration project to create a mixed- use prototype for market rate and affordable units in the downtown, medical center, commercial and/or residential neighborhood zones. A— 6.06 Assist in the development of accessory Amending December 31, N (HAP) residential units by: Ordinance/ 2020 • Developing a design manual and Resolution prototypes for ARU's Passed • Allowing the R-7 zone to increase the size of ARU's attached to primary dwelling units. • Partnering with local lenders to establish an ARDU low cost loan program. Abbreviations: COPA = City of Port Angeles; CLC = Clallam County; POPA = Port of Port Angeles; LEKT = Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe; WSDOT - Washington State Department of Transportation; WA DAHP = Washington State Department of Archeology and Historic Preservation; WA DOE = Washington State Department of Ecology; SP = City of Port Angeles Strategic Plan 2017-2018; AIA = American Institute of Architects City of Port Angeles 1 4 C ro r1 O) C O) t O) Q E O U O) O) dA C Q 4- O a- 4- 0 4— O .M l0 c -I c -I Measurable Actions Number Action C= Complete O= Ongoing N = Not Complete Short Medium Long 0< Qa Y Action / Deliverable (0-2 yr.) (2-4 yr.) (4+ yr.) OU U CL Other Metric Date Complete A-6.07 Encourage mixed use development and Ordinance December 31, N (HAP) affordable housing units by: Passed/ Study 2020 • Allowing Multi -family zones to create Completed mixed housing type developments with internal drives (via circulation plan) as an alternative to public rights-of-way. • Allow ground floor residential and convertible space in CA, CN and CSD zones. • Identify Commercially -zoned properties that have multi -family capabilities on site. • Amend zoning code to adjust setbacks, maximum site coverage allowances, and other restrictions that prevent the use of to expand the definition of allowable innovative, functional, and cost effective housing products. • Amend zoning code to eliminate larger lot size requirement for duplexes and assess the value of incentive zoning allowance beyond existing overlay zones A— 6.08 Continue to use Housing Rehabilitation Fund Number Ongoing 0 (HAP) to match grants, offer low-cost loans to allow of grants homeowners meeting income guidelines to provided remain resident in their home, maintain the value of a home, or upgrade to increase its market value. A— 6.09 Partner with Peninsula Housing Authority to Study December 31, C (HAP) identify and address barriers to affordable completed 2019 housing and funding opportunities for affordable housing projects. A— 6.10 In conjunction with local lenders and housing Program December 31, N (HAP) agencies identify rehabilitation program Adopted and 2020 requirements including the potential number Funded of housing projects, deferred or limited equity program participants, and required number and skill of renovation contractors or agents. Conservation Abbreviations: COPA = City of Port Angeles; CLC = Clallam County; POPA =Port of Port Angeles; LEKT = Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe; WSDOT - Washington State Department of Transportation; WA DAHP = Washington State Department of Archeology and Historic Preservation; WA DOE = Washington State Department of Ecology; SP = City of Port Angeles Strategic Plan 2017-2018; AIA = American Institute of Architects Measurable Actions Number Action C= Complete O= Ongoing N = Not Complete Short Medium Long Qa Qa Y Action / Deliverable (0-2 yr.) (2-4 yr.) (4+ yr.) OU U 0. Other Metric Date Complete A-7.01 Review and update the City's Fagade • Amending December 31, 0 Improvement Program to encourage Ordinance 2021 participation in streetscape beautification Passed projects and enhancements along entryway corridors. A-7.02 Develop and maintain an archaeological WA DAHP Establish December 31, 0 database, allowing for review and monitoring Budget Item 2018 of ground -disturbing activities. The database for Geographic should include: Information • Known archaeological and historical sites Systems (GIS) • A predictive model prescribing areas of high, medium and low archaeological site potential • A waterfront archaeological overlay A-7.03 Review and update the City's Urban Services • Amend Urban January 31, C Standards and Guidelines, including Services 2018 requirements for development to provide: Standards and • Dispersion, infiltration and/or retention Guidelines facilities necessary to protect water quality and provide flood protection and flow control • LID techniques and BMPs where feasible • Permeable paving materials for all sidewalks where feasible. A-7.04 Identify and inventory "habitats of local • • WA DOE Produce GIS December 31, N importance" areas, helping ensure wildlife Layer / Map 2021 corridors are not severed. A-7.05 Develop and maintain an inventory of wetland • • Produce GIS December 31, 0 delineations completed as part of land use Layer / Map 2019 permitting. A-7.06 Develop and periodically update a stormwater • WA DOE Program December 31, 0 management plan consistent with NPDES Phase Infrastructure 2018 II permit requirements. in CFP Abbreviations: COPA = City of Port Angeles; CLC= Clallam County; POPA = Port of Port Angeles; LEKT = Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe; WSDOT - Washington State Department of Transportation; WA DAHP = Washington State Department of Archeology and Historic Preservation; WA DOE = Washington State Department of Ecology; SP = City of Port Angeles Strategic Plan 2017-2018; AIA =American Institute of Architects C ro r1 O) C O) t O) L Q E O U O) O) dA C Q 4- L_ O a- 4- 0 4— O .M 00 c -I c -I Measurable Actions Number Action C= Complete O= Ongoing N = Not Complete Short Medium Long 0< Qa Y Action / Deliverable (0-2 yr.) (2-4 yr.) (4+ yr.) OU U (L Other Metric Date Complete A-7.07 Review and update the City's Urban Services • Pass December 31, N Standards and Guidelines, including measures Resolution 2021 to coordinate new development with the / Policy protection of: Document • Scenic resources • Environmentally -sensitive areas. A-7.08 Develop and adopt regulations supporting • • WA DAHP Ordinance December 31, N the preservation of identified, historically- Passed 2019 significant buildings and sites. A-7.09 Develop and adopt a tree management program • Pass December 31, N including: Resolution 2022 • Tree density targets / Policy • Urban forest management procedures and Document guidelines. A-7.10 Update the City's Shoreline Master Program by • Ordinance June 30, 2020 0 2024. Passed Capital Facilities A-8.01 Update the City's Capital Facilities Plan on an • Ordinance December 31, 0 annual basis. Passed 2017 A-8.02 Develop and implement a schedule for • LOS Plan December 31, 0 preparation and adoption of all City service 2018 and facilities plans, coordinated with the Comprehensive Plan. A-8.03 Establish review procedures for capital facilities • • WA DOE Policy December 31, 0 plan projects, ensuring projects address: Document 2020 • Endangered Species Act requirements • Climate change adaptability • PAUGA impacts • Established levels of service. A-8.04 Deliver Capital Facilities Plan for 2018-2023 • Resolution July 31, 2017 C (S P) Passed A-8.05 Secure municipal and industrial water rights • Settlement December 31, 0 (S P) Agreement 2019 A-8.06 Provide and publish year end reports for the • Report December 31, 0 (S P) Waterfront Improvement Plan Phase 3 Design Published 2019 Abbreviations: COPA = City of Port Angeles; CLC = Clallam County; POPA =Port of Port Angeles; LEKT = Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe; WSDOT - Washington State Department of Transportation; WA DAHP = Washington State Department of Archeology and Historic Preservation; WA DOE = Washington State Department of Ecology; SP = City of Port Angeles Strategic Plan 2017-2018; AIA = American Institute of Architects Measurable Actions Number Action C= Complete O= Ongoing N = Not Complete Short Medium Long Qa CL Y Action / Deliverable (0-2 yr.) (2-4 yr.) (4+ yr.) OU U Oa _J Other Metric Date Complete A-8.07 Provide and publish year end reports for the • 30% Design December 31, 0 (S P) Race Street Corridor Project 30% design Published 2019 A-8.08 City Signage and Wayfinding Program - RFP and • RFP Released December 31, C (S P) design adjustments 2019 A-8.09 Complete downtown, parks, and trail • Enhancements December 31, C (S P) enhancements for Civic Field, Calisthenics Park, Complete 2017 Georgiana Park A-8.10 Complete downtown, parks, and trail • 30% Design December 31, 0 (S P) enhancements for Hill Street Olympic Discovery 2021 Trail Project A-8.11 Complete downtown, parks, and trail • Amenities December 31, 0 (S P) enhancements for adding amenities downtown Added 2019 (e.g. tables and benches) A-8.12 Complete downtown, parks, and trail • Analysis December 31, 0 (S P) enhancements for Bike routes: address funding, Complete 2019 route maps, parking obstacles A-8.13 East entrance monument • Added to CFP December 31, N (AIA) 2018 A-8.14 Expand street art program • Ordinance July 31, 2020 N (AIA) Passed A-8.15 Replace light and signal poles in downtown with • Added to CFP July 31, 2018 C (AIA) new structures at pedestrian scale A-8.16 Place overhead utilities underground • Added to CFP July 31, 2020 0 (AIA) A-8.17 Create public view points and overlooks along • Added to CFP July 31, 2020 0 (AIA) bluff above downtown Economic Development A-9.01 Negotiate a vegetation easement with the Port • • Execute December 31, 0 of Port Angeles, providing long-term resolution Easement 2019 to concerns regarding trees at Lincoln Park. / Interlocal Agreement A-9.02 Develop policy encouraging the creation of new • • • • PADA Pass December 31, C tourism events, enhancing tourism during the Resolution 2017 limited value season. Abbreviations: COPA = City of Port Angeles; CLC = Clallam County; POPA = Port of Port Angeles; LEKT = Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe; WSDOT - Washington State Department of Transportation; WA DAHP = Washington State Department of Archeology and Historic Preservation; WA DOE = Washington State Department cf Ecology; SP = City of Port Angeles Strategic Plan 2017-2018; AIA = American Institute of Architects C ro r1 O) C O) t O) L I? E O U O) O) t]A C Q L O a- 4- 0 4— O .M O c4 c -I c -I Measurable Actions Number Action C= Complete O= Ongoing N = Not Complete Short Medium Long 0< U Qa Y Action / Deliverable (0-2 yr.) (2-4 yr.) (4+ yr.) OU U 0. Other Metric Date Complete A-9.03 Review and update the City's Urban Services • Amend Urban December 31, 0 Standards and Guidelines, including: Services 2020 • Street and parking lot tree plantings Standards • Use of appropriate vegetation in planter strips and bio -retention facilities. A-9.04 The City will support the implementation of the • • Number of December 31, C Mount Angeles View Project including a new Letter of 2018 Boys and Girls Club, recognizing that the overall Support project results in affordable housing and child care for the local workforce. A-9.05 The City will continue to make improvements • Number of December 31, 0 as part of the Waterfront Development Plan Letters of 2019 while providing support to abutting investments Support, made by the Port Angeles Waterfront Center Number of (Preforming Arts Center) and Feiro Marine Life Permits Issued Center. A-9.06 The City will work with Clallam County to ensure • Number of December 31, 0 enhancements to William Shore Memorial Pool Letters of 2019 continue to provide benefits to the Port Angeles Support, community. Number of Permits Issued A-9.07 Provide and publish year end reports for Fayade • Applications December 31, 0 (S P) Improvement Program — present 5 applications Presented Annually to Planning Commission A-9.08 If we continue to contract with PADA: Inventory • PADA Execute March 31, 0 (S P) vacant downtown commercial properties and Contract 2020 apply Buxton study to identify needed business types. A-9.09 Create plan motivating vacant property owners • Plan March 31, 0 (S P) to upgrade buildings or lots Developed 2020 A-9.10 Improve the downtown banners at the entries to • PADA Execute December 31, 0 (AIA) the downtown with PADA contract Contract 2029 A-9.11 Infill development in downtown • Added to CFP December 31, 0 (AIA) and Comp. 2022 Plan A-9.12 National Park Center in City • New Kiosk / DT December 31, 0 (AIA) Footprint 2022 Abbreviations: COPA = City of Port Angeles; CLC = Clallam County; POPA = Port of Port Angeles; LEKT = Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe; WSDOT - Washington State Department of Transportation; WA DAHP = Washington State Department of Archeology and Historic Preservation; WA DOE = Washington State Department of Ecology; SP = City of Port Angeles Strategic Plan 2017-2018; AIA = American Institute of Architects Measurable Actions Number Action C= Complete O= Ongoing N = Not Complete Short Medium Long Qa Qa Y Action / Deliverable (0-2 yr.) (2-4 yr.) (4+ yr.) OU U Oa _j Other Metric Date Complete Long -Range Financial Plan A-LRFP.1 Update Long -Range Financial Plan for 2018-2023 Resolution December 31, C (S P) Passed 2018 A-LRFP.2 Sell Nichel and Lincoln Street Properties • Execute December 31, C (S P) Purchase/Sale 2018 A-LRFP.3 Sell Morse Creek property • Execute July 31, 2020 N (S P) Purchase/Sale A-LRFP.4 Increase EMS utility fee to cover additional • Ordinance July 31, 2020 N (S P) paramedic resources Passed A-LRFP.5 Reexamine public safety funding option for tax • Ordinance December 31, N (S P) exempt propertiess Passed 2020 CCitywide Work PlanN CA-CWP.1 Professional development plans for Council • Plans December 31, C N(SP)C Complete 2018 A-CWP.2 Records management program - replace staff • Position Filled December 31, N (S P) position 2020 A-CWP.3 Records management program - bring three • Three Depts. December 31, C (S P) departments onto ECM system on ECM 2018 A-CWP.4 Deliver and support new online tools for data • Online September N (S P) reporting and building permit process (public Permitting 30, 2020 use) Available A-CWP.5 Confirm Council community agenda topics and • Agendas Set September C (S P) attendees 30, 2017 A-CWP.6 Education: Meet with superintendent, re: • Meeting June 30, 2017 C (S P) November Ballot Complete Abbreviations: COPA =City of Port Angeles; CLC = Clallam County; POPA =Port of Port Angeles; LEKT = Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe; WSDOT - Washington State Department of Transportation; WA DAHP = Washington State Department of Archeology and Historic Preservation; WA DOE = Washington State Department of Ecology; SP = City of Port Angeles Strategic Plan 2017-2018; AIA = American Institute of Architects C ro a N C N t N I? E O U N N dA C Q L O a- 4- 0 4— O a-+ ,M This page is left intentionally blank „r nom, r r f°������� f 1!4!l�,iP; � �>. � ...” �, � �� ��us��p�� f >+� � ��lSi{��l�ll � ��+ 11 u, rifi��, � ���n ��� �} � ��� 1�� s ' � �� �„ °� //��s�'����ii�f ����� �; � ��,x .. �.m. � �� U�t,+ �a��� ` �1� ��� i � ,, �j� 1 „ �, ,,: .� —� :.4e d ,.,. -� __ �„ o� — �,�v� ��" ,: t .. ': **., . �. I f, City of Port Angeles Comprehensive . ..... ,a an en ices 2019 Amendment (This page intentionally left blank) Table of Contents: Appendices Appendix A - Community Profile CityHistory..............................................................................................................................A•1 Current Characteristics............................................................................................................A•6 Air..................................................................................................................................................... A67 Water............................................................................................................................................... A67 Wildlife............................................................................................................................................. A68 NaturalResources............................................................................................................................ A69 Environmentally Sensitive Areas Map (Figure A.05)............................................................................... A•6 Population........................................................................................................................................ A612 Population Projections, OFM (Table A. 01).............................................................................................. A•13 LandUse.......................................................................................................................................... A013 Number of Parcels, by Zone (Figure A.06).............................................................................................. A•11 Industrial Zone Land Use (Figure A. 07)................................................................................................... A•11 Residential Zone Land Use (Figure A. 08)................................................................................................ A•11 CommunityFacilities........................................................................................................................ A•13 PlanningAreas.................................................................................................................................. A615 City Planning Areas Map (Figure A. 09)................................................................................................... A•12 UrbanGrowth Areas........................................................................................................................ A618 Urban Growth Areas Map (Figure A.10)................................................................................................. A•14 Neighborhoods................................................................................................................................ A018 City Neighborhoods Map (Figure A.11).................................................................................................. A616 Housing............................................................................................................................................ A028 Transportation................................................................................................................................. A028 Arterial Street System Map (Figure A.14)............................................................................................... A622 Clallam Transit System Map (Figure A. 15).............................................................................................. A623 UrbanServices................................................................................................................................. A032 Fire Four -Minute Response Map (Figure A. 17)....................................................................................... A•25 City Park Areas Map (Figure A.20)......................................................................................................... A•27 Public School Locations Map (Figure A. 21)............................................................................................. A•30 Appendix B - Definitions Appendix C - GMA Requirements GeneralComments.................................................................................................................. C•1 Requirements for the Land Use Element................................................................................. CO2 Requirements for the Land Use Element (Table C.01').............................................................................C•2 Requirements for the Housing Element................................................................................... CO3 Requirements for the Housing Element (Table C. 02)...............................................................................C•4 Requirements for the Capital Facilities Element...................................................................... C04 Requirements for the Capital Facilities Element (Table C. 03)..................................................................C•5 apx•i City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plane Requirements for the Utilities & Public Services Element....................................................... C05 Requirements for the Utilities & Public Services Element (Table C.04)....................................................C•5 Requirements for the Transportation Element........................................................................ C05 Requirements for the Transportation Element (Table C.05).....................................................................C•7 Requirements for Siting Public Facilities.................................................................................. C97 Requirements for Siting Public Facilities (Table C.06)..............................................................................C•7 Appendix D - Transportation Analysis GeneralComments..................................................................................................................D•1 DataCollection........................................................................................................................D•2 Traffic Growth Forecast...........................................................................................................D•2 Intersection Level of Service Analysis......................................................................................D•3 Intersection Level of Service Criteria (Table 1)........................................................................................ D•4 Intersection Operations Summary - PM Peak Hour (Table 2).................................................................. D05 Roadway Segment Level of Service Analysis............................................................................D•5 Roadway Segment Operations Summary - PM Peak Hour (Table 3) ....................................................... D07 MitigationMeasures................................................................................................................D•7 A Table of Contents apx•ii if i (This page intentionally left blank) Community Profile City History The City of Port Angeles has long been the primary urban center of the North Olympic Peninsula. The earliest residents of the area were the Klallam Tribe ("Strong People"), Native Americans who were sustained by the region's abundant natural resources. These same natural resources - the naturally protected deep -water harbor, abundant coniferous forests, prolific wildlife and marine resources, and an overall natural beauty also attracted the first non -natives to the area and continue today to encourage visitors and new residents alike from all walks of life. Known variously as "Old Dungeness," "False Dungeness," "Cherbourg," and "Port Angeles," settlement was intermittent and sporadic throughout the early history of the city. In 1862 (due largely to the efforts of one man: Victor Smith, the "Father of Port Angeles"), President Abraham Lincoln signed an executive order setting aside 3,520 acres of land on the site as a U.S. Government Lighthouse and Military Reservation. Soon after, the original townsite layout was platted 0 poolam outm ULL CREt I � qac i i Carr Parl Avoks Rubir Mail Figure A.01 — Port Angeles, as depicted in a 1917 Army Corps/USGS survey map (Image: University of Texas, Perry- Cos taneda Library Map Collection) by the US Army Corps of Engineers, and the townsite of Port Angeles has endured to this day. Patterned after the plan of Cincinnati, Ohio (substituting the Harbor for the Ohio River), the streets are arranged and named the same: Front, First, Second, etc.; at right angles to these are Tumwater, Cedar, Pine, Valley, Cherry, Oak, Laurel, Vine, and Race Street. While the City has benefited greatly from that original planning with its grid -pattern street layout, various challenges were also created such as utility service provision and circulatory problems, due to the topography of the land. Six different streams, with associated ravines, travel through the community flowing north from the foothills of the Olympic Mountains as they quickly make their way to the Strait of Juan de Fuca. They are: Dry Creek, Tumwater Creek, Valley Creek, Peabody Creek, Ennis Creek, White's Creek, with Lee's Creek, and Morse Creek located within the City's Urban Growth Areas. Despite such early planning, major settlement did not take place within the city until 1887, with the founding of the Puget Sound Cooperative Colony. A social experiment in communal living, the Colony contributed greatly to the early expansion of Port Angeles. Although short-lived, this settlement near the mouth of Ennis Creek built a sawmill, lath -mill and shipyard; constructed a 58 -foot propeller -driven schooner ("The Angeles"); started the first newspaper in town ("The Model Commonwealth"); and built the first schoolhouse, office building and a city opera house - in addition to founding four different churches in Port Angeles. The colony was largely disbanded by 1889 due to internal disputes, but many of the colonists stayed and blended with the rest of the thriving community. A93 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti By 1890, the city population had soared to over 3,000 people, and the Government Reserve established 28 years earlier had become a bottleneck to progress, completely restricting further development of the city since it could not legally be homesteaded. The result was a "land rush" onto the federal property, as citizens took matters into their own hands as "Reserve Jumpers" - moving en- masse onto the reserve, platting lots, and establishing homesteads. Eventually, forced to recognize this matter officially, Congress conceded ownership to the squatters and opened the Reserve for sale to the public. The year 1890 was also notable as the year Port Angeles was officially incorporated as a city in the newly established State of Washington, and that same year it also became the County Seat of Clallam County. Thereafter, the City grew more slowly and developed much as other small towns in the Pacific Northwest. Gone were the early pretensions of becoming a great seaport or second national city patterned after Washington, D.C. Logging and timber have long been important industries, and in 1914 Port Angeles was home to the world's largest sawmill. In 1920, a large pulp and paper mill was built by Washington Pulp and Paper Company. Purchased a few years later and operated by Crown Zellerbach for over 60 years, the paper mill, located at the base of Figure A.02 — This detail of the "Ennis Creek" mural depicts a 1700s -era Klallum village. (Image: Feiro Marine Life Center) Appendix A - Community Profile A94 �i rnri nrppinc' Neah gays ' Seklu ,y i'Tr. Port Angeles '� Port Townsend F A� S q Clallam County r Figure A.03 — Port Angeles, as located in Clallam County and relative to Washington State. Figure A.04 — Downtown Port Angeles was dramatically transformed in 1914 when street - level grades were raised 12 feet or more following a massive sluice operation - effectively a man- made mud slide using a nearby hillside for source material. Ediz Hook, is now owned and operated by McKinley Co. The City experienced sporadic growth until the linking of Port Angeles with the transcontinental railroad in 1914 brought increased prosperity. As rail transport increased and sea travel waned, Port Angeles surpassed Port Townsend as the major center for trade and commerce on the Olympic Peninsula. Sustained largely by marine trades and the forest products and fishing industries, Port Angeles became a classic American small town and the center of urban life on the North Olympic Peninsula. In1922, the Port of Port Angeles was formed. The natural deep -water harbor has always attracted shipping as well as commercial and sports fishing. The Port now operates the Boat Haven Marina and The William Fairchild International Airport, in addition to managing much of the shoreline properties west of downtown Port Angeles. The first Coast Guard air station on the Pacific Coast was established at Ediz Hook on June 1, 1935. It is the oldest United States Coast Guard Station in the country. The piece of land currently occupied by the Coast Guard Station is the one remaining part of the military reservation that once included all of what is now Port Angeles. The station officially became Coast Guard Group Port Angeles in September of 1944, and received its first helicopter in 1946. By far the largest civic project was the regrading of the downtown streets, which occurred in 1914. That project created the current street elevation in the downtown - which resulted in basement levels for then - existing businesses (now the "Port Angeles Underground"). The Olympic Power Company was formed in 1911 to construct the Lower Elwha Dam. The County Courthouse was built A95 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti on Lincoln Street in 1915. A new fire station was built in 1931. A new police station and jail was built in 1954, and a new City Hall in 1987. In 1953, Port Angeles received the "All American City" award. Over the past forty years, except for a few periods of more rapid growth in the 1920s and 30s, the city has grown at a fairly stable rate of approximately one percent per year, to its present population of 19,370. The City has used zoning to coordinate development and growth since the 1930s, and in the early 1960s, made a determined effort to improve planning efforts through development of a "701" master plan along with a new zoning ordinance and subdivision ordinance. In 1976, the City again reviewed its planning goals and processes, and adopted the 1976 Comprehensive Plan, which is the immediate predecessor of this Comprehensive Plan. Even before the State passed the Growth Management Act (GMA) of 1990 requiring cities and counties to revise or adopt comprehensive plans, the City of Port Angeles had decided it was time to revise the existing Comprehensive Plan, and had already begun that process when the GMA established new requirements for comprehensive plans. In response, the City has continued to move forward, consistent with the GMA, meeting all of its requirements, including the mandated completion dates. Appendix A - Community Profile A•6 �i Enviiunnmmal y Ser siliveArnwr, Gto Wan MM it dol MM P�M M ,;keekztDW r M Net or, cr e U OM I _ J4wrta1Cwmr$w 1 r� -•s}.i�.x s•�rra.v��s,�.xr un r.. pfw e,.. �. w n.�;��r..ry s�w�o-M �n.,,•. ,e, yiati rh Figure A.05 — This map of Port Angeles' "environmentally sensitive areas" shows general locations of marine bluffs, ravines, shoreline buffers and modified fill areas. Current Characteristics An essential part of developing goals and setting directions for the future lies in reviewing the past and evaluating the present. An Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), prepared by the consulting firm of Nancy A. Ryan and Company for the 1994 Comprehensive Plan takes an in-depth look at the physical, social, and economic aspects of Port Angeles. A second addendum to the original EIS was prepared and adopted for the updates that have occurred over a three-year period ending in 2004. The following descriptions are intended to provide the users of this document with a general view of the community. For a more detailed analysis, refer to the EIS and the 2004 update addendum. A97 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti f i 1 r� -•s}.i�.x s•�rra.v��s,�.xr un r.. pfw e,.. �. w n.�;��r..ry s�w�o-M �n.,,•. ,e, yiati rh Figure A.05 — This map of Port Angeles' "environmentally sensitive areas" shows general locations of marine bluffs, ravines, shoreline buffers and modified fill areas. Current Characteristics An essential part of developing goals and setting directions for the future lies in reviewing the past and evaluating the present. An Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), prepared by the consulting firm of Nancy A. Ryan and Company for the 1994 Comprehensive Plan takes an in-depth look at the physical, social, and economic aspects of Port Angeles. A second addendum to the original EIS was prepared and adopted for the updates that have occurred over a three-year period ending in 2004. The following descriptions are intended to provide the users of this document with a general view of the community. For a more detailed analysis, refer to the EIS and the 2004 update addendum. A97 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti Location The City of Port Angeles is located in Clallam County on the northern coast of Washington's Olympic Peninsula (See Figure A.03). It is less than three hours driving time (including the ferry ride) from Seattle or Olympia, and is located at the base of the Olympic Mountains' north slope. Immediately to the north is the coastal marine environment of the Port Angeles Harbor, one of the deepest naturally -protected harbors on the West Coast, and Strait of Juan de Fuca. To the south are the pristine alpine wilderness areas of the Olympic National Park, to the east is the semi -arid climate of the Sequim-Dungeness Valley, and within two hours time to the west is the Hoh Rain Forest and the beaches and rugged beauty of the Pacific Coast. Air The circulation of air around the Olympic Mountains and through the Strait of Juan de Fuca results in mostly easterly or westerly winds in the vicinity of Port Angeles. Highest winds are generally associated with intense winter storms, and may be from either an easterly or westerly direction. On most summer afternoons, a moderate to strong westerly breeze can be expected. Wind velocity and direction vary with the season. Winds from the west predominate and are strongest during the summer, averaging about 14 miles per hour. Winds from the south and east occur more frequently during the winter, with an average velocity of about nine miles per hour. Water Port Angeles is located in the Port Angeles watershed, which drains 65,000 acres (101.5 square miles). A gradually -descending slope from the Olympic Mountains north to the Strait of Juan de Fuca characterizes the topography of the immediate Port Angeles area. Steep hillsides and bluffs of 50 to 150 feet in elevation mark the northern edge of the slope. This region is segmented by streams, which flow from the mountains toward the Strait and have formed V-shaped ravines that are much lower in elevation than surrounding areas. These ravines contain the following major creeks passing through the community to Port Angeles Harbor and the Strait of Juan de Fuca: Dry Creek, Tumwater Creek, Valley Creek, Peabody Creek, Ennis/White's Creek; Lee's Creek and Morse Creek are located east of the City limits in the UGA. The Elwha River is located approximately 1.25 miles west of the City, and is the primary water Appendix A - Community Profile A98 �i source for the city. Very few sites in the City obtain potable water from wells. Wildlife Port Angeles is located in an area replete with wildlife. The City is located adjacent to Olympic National Park and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The drainages that pass through Port Angeles provide wooded corridors and habitat for a wide variety of wildlife. Various freshwater wetlands are scattered throughout the city. Port Angeles Harbor is approximately 2,435 acres in size and is one of the deepest natural harbors on the west coast. It provides habitat for many aquatic species. The wooded riparian areas provide food, cover, spawning, breeding, and rearing areas for a wide variety of wildlife species. Trees and other plants shade streams and help keep water cool while stabilizing banks and providing food and habitat for insects, amphibians, reptiles, mammals, birds and fish. Trees also provide cover for wildlife. When trees die and fall into the streams, the logs create small dams and pools that offer fish rearing habitat and cover from predators. Logs that remain on land provide cover for wildlife. Wildlife from the ravines also make use of surrounding developed properties and undeveloped lands for foraging. Within Clallam County, the Washington State Department of Wildlife (Priority Habitats and Species program) has indicated that there are 15 "priority habitats" and 104 "priority species" listed in Clallam County.2 Due to an agreement with the Department of Wildlife, the location of these habitats is not made available. The locations have been reviewed and considered as part of this analysis. The location of other less sensitive species has been identified in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). In particular, there are three areas that harbor seals use for haul -out. Those sites are the beach at the former Rayonier Mill site, Hollywood Beach near downtown, and the south shore of Ediz Hook in Port Angeles Harbor. Department of Wildlife maps identify an area along the Harbor side of Ediz Hook that has "regular large concentrations" of shorebirds. The bluff along the shoreline also provides a special and valuable habitat for shorebirds and other wildlife. Within the Olympic National Park, Roosevelt Elk roam the slopes of the mountains. Other wildlife include black bears, cougars, coyotes, mountain beavers, minks, raccoons, otters, wolves, eagles, hawks, 1. State of Washington Priority Habitats and Species List, August 2008 A•9 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ravens, and grouse. Fisher have recently been reintroduced into the Olympic National Park as well. Mountain goats were introduced to the Olympic National Park during the last century and have become well-established. All of the creeks that make up the Port Angeles watershed are used for fish habitat, but most have barriers to fish migration. Coho, cutthroat and possibly steelhead use Dry Creek. Tumwater Creek provides anadromous use by coho, cutthroat, and steelhead well - upstream of the City limits. Valley Creek and Peabody Creek may be used by sea -run cutthroat, however, these runs are not felt to be self-sustaining. The stream ravines provide sections of relatively high quality habitat, and are recognized by the State as sustaining significant populations of resident fish and potentially having salmon runs restored - once downstream impediments are removed. The resident fish currently present in Ennis Creek are coho, sea -run cutthroat, and steelhead. The fish migrate up to 4.9 miles from the Port Angeles Harbor. White's Creek, which joins Ennis Creek, contains coho, steelhead, and sea -run cutthroat only up to Front Street. The estuary at Valley Creek was restored to its original condition as a mitigation action in 1996. Extensive restoration of Valley Creek has been accomplished upstream from the southern end of Valley Street to the Highway 101 crossing. Restoration efforts have been supported by City land acquisitions along the lower portions of Valley Creek, with the intent of future restoration projects. Natural Resources There are very limited forest areas, and no mineral lands located within the City. Much of the forested areas are located within stream ravines or along the marine bluffs. Approximately 35 acres of developable lands remain forested. Lincoln Park and Shane park also contain forested areas that are protected from development, however the trees in Lincoln Park are beginning to penetrate the air space needed for approach to Fairchild Airport, and will likely be removed in the future. The City of Port Angeles contains 26 miles of marine shoreline including Ediz Hook, a four -mile -long sand spit, and 17 miles of streams. Diverse scenic resources are abundant in Port Angeles. Notable visual elements include the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Ediz Hook, Vancouver Island, San Juan Islands, Mt. Baker, Hurricane Ridge, and the Olympic National Park. Of special note are the views along the bluffs above Port Angeles Harbor. The Ocean View Cemetery Wt.— Appendix A - Community Profile A910 �i NUMBER OF PARCELS by ZDN E 1331 34Ga ]mo 897 934 457 #45 4M ' 197 171 161 140 � 113 117 115 to 61 RS -9 P9P PS -7 RHO CA av CSD C1 IL NMD FNo H CIO MAU Derr Figure A.06 — This chart shows the number of parcels associated with Port Angeles zoning categories. Ind u tTial Zone Land Use ADD 1400 iz0m Woa ao0 Wo 400 200 a ustrinl0raado�ad Indusbiel UndEvdcW Figure A.07 — Developed and undeveloped industrial -zoned land, in acres. `J6 of Residentia Ity Zoned Parcels Remaining Undeveloped 5D% 43� 4D% 3D% 2D% 14% 11`1 ID% 1 MA RS -:7 R5'9 AHO RM® RS -11 Figure A.08 — Developed and undeveloped residential -zoned land, in acres. A911 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan t �� at the west edge of town provides views northward and along the coastline. The beaches and beachfront trail along the shoreline also offer views of Ediz Hook, the Strait of Juan de Fuca, and Vancouver Island. Ediz Hook has superlative views of the Strait, mountains, waterfront, and the city. The vegetated creek ravines offer wooded open space, providing wildlife habitat and corridors connecting the waterfront with the foothills. Other open space amenities include wetlands, steep slopes, marshes, hilltops, and even open fields. Noise The primary sources of noise in Port Angeles is air traffic from the airport and the Coast Guard base, industrial activities along the Port Angeles Harbor shoreline, vehicular traffic, and construction activities. The ambient noise levels within the City of Port Angeles would be expected to vary depending on location within the city. In 1986, a Noise Compatibility Planning Study was conducted for the Fairchild International Airport under the guidelines of the Federal Aviation Regulations. The Planning Study included analyses of both existing and projected noise levels associated with the aviation traffic. The one remaining mill along the waterfront is a source of noise and is in a difficult place to provide noise attenuation. Since the mill is visible from many residential areas on the bluff top to the south, these residences can be expected to receive the greatest noise impacts. The Rayonier Mill closed in late 1990s, leaving no noise -producing industries east of the downtown area. The K -Ply mill near downtown closed in 2011, with site remediation completed in 2016. The Port of Port Angeles intends redevelopment of the site for marine trades industries. Higher noise levels are allowed for motor vehicles operations on public roads. Warning sirens and temporary construction equipment are generally exempt from the noise regulations. Traffic levels would be expected to be highest along major transportation routes of US 101, First Street, Front Street, Lincoln, Lauridsen Boulevard, Race Street, Tumwater Truck Route, and Marine Drive. tI Appendix A - Community Profile A912 Population The population for the City of Port Angeles in 1993 was 18,270; this represented an increase of three percent over the 1990 population of 17,710. The population for Clallam County in 1993 was 61,400. The percentage of the County population residing in the City dropped to 28.5% in 2004. The 2000 population of 18,397 marked a 3.7% increase over the 1990 population. The population had risen to 18,740 by 2007, and was 19,090 in 2015. The State Office of Financial Management (OFM) has projected a five percent growth rate over the next 20 years for Clallam County; this, along with a linear projection for Port Angeles, is illustrated in Table A.01. The City population so far not grown at the projected rate. Table A.01- Population Projections based on Office of Financial Management Population 2010 2015 2025 2035 2045 Port Angeles 19,038 20,509 23,802 27,623 32,058 Clallam County 71,404 75,717 85,142 95,739 107,655 The population figures in Table A.01 are projections based on an estimated 1.5% growth rate from 2010 census data. These numbers are considered high due to the historic growth rate for the City of 0.36% per year. Using information from the 2015 OF estimate, the percentage of Clallam County population attributed to the City of Port Angeles was 26.3%. Land Use The City of Port Angeles contains 10.7 square miles or 6,856 acres of land area. There are residential areas, industrial areas and commercial areas with a fairly well defined Central Business District (CBD). Figure A.06 shows the number of parcels within each zone. Port Angeles currently has land available in each zone designation to meet the anticipated future needs for developable lands. Figure A.07 and Figure A.08 indicate the amount of available land for industrial and residential lands, respectively. Currently, there are 567 parcels developed with infrastructure available for residential development. Community Facilities Community facilities include a 126 -bed hospital, one public library, one fire station, one police station, 22 developed parks, the Senior A913 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti Services Community Center, a public swimming pool, the Vern Burton Community Center, a publicly owned cemetery, one private golf course, four cultural centers (Port Angeles Fine Arts Center, Arthur D. Fierro Marine Lab, The Lower Elwha Klallam Cultural Center, and the North Olympic Cultural Center). The Port Angeles School District Number 121 serves the City of Port Angeles and its surrounding community. The District operates five elementary schools, one middle school (grades 7-8), one high school, one alternative high school, and is host to the North Olympic Peninsula Skills Center. Within the City of Port Angeles there are three elementary schools; Franklin Elementary, Hamilton Elementary, and Jefferson Elementary. Dry Creek Elementary School is located west of the city limits and Roosevelt Elementary is located east of the City limits. Stevens Middle School, Port Angeles High School and Lincoln High School provide for secondary education. The Skills Center, working closely with Peninsula College and five neighboring school districts - Cape Flattery, Crescent, Quileute, Port MA� PUbIK Schools GIy Umi. RA 14arb-Y A LMlim C.w.&W &haul AWqr" RI =� "Arr*M P-16rpcIMy $rhoaI 51u. C+�I�i • °e +°� b Fs wed Iv. 4p.rdnosl-hiYm�Awv h+' C+r'IF'*-Wgr4t 44Ind We �q oft -ane prp F-w+�jrt4W'd WN.ex�ro4 Mr+Y�4r Cep Figure A.21 — Public schools located in Port Angeles. Appendix A - Community Profile A914 �i Angeles and Sequim School Districts - provides the latest vocational/ technical education in a competency -based learning environment. Peninsula College, with its main campus located in the foothills of the Olympic Mountains and overlooking the Strait of Juan de Fuca, provides a vital center for higher education and diverse cultural opportunities, enhancing and strengthening community bonds for the residents of the North Olympic Peninsula. College programs include traditional academic transfer offerings, professional - technical training, Basic Education for Adults, adult continuing education, on-line learning courses and a center for baccalaureate degrees, allowing students many educational options. In addition to the many associate degree and certificate programs, Peninsula College offers a baccalaureate degree in Applied Management. The college also works with key university partners, providing numerous opportunities for residents to earn bachelor degrees locally. These partners include City University, Western Washington University, Goddard College and Evergreen State College. Peninsula College is committed to providing college/community connections and has numerous partnerships and collaborations in the community with the City of Port Angeles, the Port of Port Angeles, the Port Angeles School District, the Economic Development Council, local tribes, private businesses and others. The college offers classes, training and resources in support of workforce development and community enrichment. The college currently serves over 5,000 students and employs 145 full-time faculty and staff and approximately 390 part-time faculty and staff. The Port of Port Angeles operates a 16.1 -acre marina, with approximately 375 boat slips and 3,000 feet of dock for tie-ups, and a public boat yard for repair and maintenance. The Boat Haven Marina was upgraded during 2007-2008. The port also operates the William R. Fairchild International Airport. Planning Areas The Comprehensive Plan divides the City into eight planning areas. For the purpose of description, the individual planning areas are identified as the Harbor, Northwest, Southwest, North Central, South Central, East, Eastern Urban Growth Area and Southwestern Urban Growth Area planning areas. These areas are located on Figure A.09 and are described as follows: A915 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan t �� Harbor The Harbor planning area includes all shoreline areas adjacent to Port Angeles Harbor and contains the Coast Guard Station, the City - operated boat ramps, Harborview Park, and the McKinley Paper Company Mill, all on Ediz Hook. The historic downtown and waterfront are also essential parts of this sub -area. The boat haven marina, log export terminal, the Coho Ferry terminal, and City Pier Park line the waterfront. Entertainment activities (movie theater, bookstores, antique shops, galleries, historic underground tour and restaurants) abound within the pedestrian -oriented central business district. Also in the Harbor planning area is the former Rayonier Mill site. The mill has been closed since 1997, and has been demolished. The site is undergoing remediation for clean-up of materials left from the previous mill operation. In 2013, the City purchased a five million- gallon storage tank that remained on the site and has incorporated the tank into its facilities for the remediation of combined sewer overflows into Port Angeles Harbor. A4 �• Y •vWr"� Ld�T�. }�� .m � . Y !al � • Clry Planning Arims �= eIInds r�r�a+ar�+a LL—i P dY lYYi lig Ar"D 7 Sy .�ifYO'.11 e cg �vdY writ■ -i..+ t -r-r' •- •,,kplYe4 iQ ,.",,. h'! l+ r+!!YY•P4 Jrych ti' °,— •+c o.'CrrvFc+ Lp ek+c.+nr -'„!Y„i kc 1tic.cwc �abYFr o"Y4c CJ} Figure A.09 — Planning areas defined for purposes of this comprehensive plan. � Appendix A - Community Profile A916 �i s Northwest The Northwest planning area covers the western edge of the city lying west of Tumwater Creek and north of Fairchild International Airport. This area is comprised largely of older homes, however recent growth pressure has led to new subdivisions and home construction in the area. There is a commercial area located at 8th and "C" Street, serving the residents of the west end of the City. A pocket of industrial/ commercial activities is located along the Tumwater Truck Route near the US 101 junction. This area of town has limited access because of the Tumwater Creek ravine and the bluffs. The Northwest Planning Area has the largest segment of undeveloped residential land within the current City limits. Southwest The Southwest planning area includes Fairchild International Airport, the Clallam County Fairgrounds, Ocean View Cemetery, the Port Angeles Regional Transfer Station, The Extreme Sports Park property, ii CRti' UG Ubtyp EunA •aJ7,A MU 'A 'M1e raa�v +r� �n Ms eaed n a kpF cka.a sR v, r� a rn�s �mestics{ rir� CFr p�rr� sn.p Q�sa 4 •hs�n wxa�:v ■vax� =+res• �r s•�F�n +o �$r�q a'�++� bc��s �cans,.abMFr v"�5c C+r Figure A.10 — Urban Growth Areas (UGAs) defined for purposes of this comprehensive plan. A917 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ��� Fairchild International Airport and Lincoln Park. In 2005, the city annexed 358 acres of land into the southwest planning area. Much of the area is included in the Eclipse Industrial Park. Industrial development is located at the airport industrial park, and the area was annexed in 2005. A few homes lie within the City limits along Lower Elwha Road, but otherwise this planning area contains predominantly industrial and public land uses. North Central The North Central planning area is an older, denser portion of town. It is an area bounded on the west by the Tumwater Creek ravine and divided by Valley Creek and Peabody Creek ravines. It contains City Hall, Clallam County courthouse, the William Shore pool and the Carnegie Library museum. The commercial uses along Lincoln Street provide community shopping opportunities. Recreation is provided by a number of neighborhood parks. Much of the city's multifamily housing is within this planning area. South Central The South Central planning area is the area of town with newer homes on larger lots. This planning area was annexed into the City after much development had occurred. The street pattern changes from traditional townsite blocks to smaller lots in older areas and large blocks and cul- de-sacs in newer areas. The Port Angeles High School lies within this planning area. The Olympic National Park Headquarters and Visitors Center is along the Heart of the Hills Road. East The East planning area is the area east of Race Street to the eastern city limits. This area has a mix of older homes and newer residential subdivisions and development, as well as a portion of the First and Front Street commercial corridor. This planning area includes Peninsula College facilities and Peninsula Golf Club. Urban Growth Areas Eastern UGA The Eastern Urban Growth Area (UGA) is generally the area east of the city limits. Remnant properties in the UGA that are located south of the city limits and east of Valley Creek are considered to be in this UGA until annexation occurs, whereby they will be considered to be part of the adjacent planning area. Policies for this planning area are adopted by Clallam County as a part of the Port Angeles Regional Comprehensive Plan. wn,.— Appendix A - Community Profile A918 �i Figure A.12 — Downtown is Port Angeles' smallest neighborhood, but it's also the city's most dynamic, featuring dozens of shops, restaurants, beach and community gathering areas, and the Coho Ferry serving Victoria, BC. (Image: Studio Cascade, Inc.) Western UGA The Western UGA is generally the area west and south of the City limits. Remnant properties in the UGA that are located south of the pre -2005 city limits, north of Highway 101 and west of Tumwater Creek as far as Reddick Road are considered to be in this UGA until annexation occurs, whereby they will be considered to be part of the adjacent planning area. Policies for this planning area are adopted by Clallam County as a part of the Port Angeles Regional Comprehensive Plan. Neighborhoods The City's planning areas are made up of 18 separate neighborhoods. The distinct neighborhoods are described in the following sections. Downtown The downtown neighborhood is the smallest neighborhood, extending north from the marine bluff to the waterfront and east from Valley Street to Chase Street on the east, and extending east along the Waterfront Trail to Vine Street (extended). The Downtown neighborhood is the traditional community center of the City. Many of the structures are two stories tall, with a few having residential uses on the second floor, or are used for offices. Many others are in disrepair, or are vacant. Buildings in the downtown area span several decades and architectural styles, some dating to the early 20th century. Few structures are more than two stories tall. The Lee Plaza is the major residential structure in the downtown area, and is managed by the Peninsula Housing Authority for low-income individuals. The City's Comprehensive Plan and zoning ordinance support increased residential uses in the downtown. The downtown is a walkable neighborhood, with ample sidewalk areas, mid -block crosswalks and a large variety of eateries and gathering places. A locally -owned natural A919 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti foods market, specializing in organic products and locally -grown produce anchors the west end of the downtown area. Washington State Department of Health and Human Services operates out of a downtown location. Ample parking is scattered throughout the downtown area. There are no longer any large anchor chain stores in the Downtown, however there are many individual shops providing unique items, such as clothing, books, candy, brewing supplies, boutique clothing, athletic goods, auto parts, novelties, gifts, art and furniture. Several City projects have been undertaken in the downtown in recent years. Water mains, sewer lines, sidewalks and street trees have been replaced. The sidewalks are constructed of pavers to enhance the aesthetics of the area. A recent project has replaced shoreline armoring along a portion of Railroad Avenue west of the ferry landing. Improved waterfront treatments and removal of hard armoring in favor of two pocket beach areas has returned areas further west to a much more natural A -- Ciiy NNOhbMhOi5d& wayUrvels u - !`du FI ooY I i .o aur f�ffY I •. 4M Cmik 'A, Ang e4 ib ' YAnLEnd I it*.s,o r c.r "A w:pw dwiow mwv� } i •, . rL. WM... .4*Aa f. -f.W,. •neo Ckh&WI,wAN v., Ii r.4 Figure A.11 — Port Angeles neighborhoods defined for purposes of this comprehensive plan. IWC �'�� Appendix A - Community Profile A920 Figure A.13 — 2016 updates to the Comprehensive Plan support greater housing diversity in Port Angeles neighborhoods, providing options for all. (Image: Studio Cascade, Inc.) appearance. This project also resulted in the formal extension of the Olympic Discovery/ Waterfront Trail through the downtown area, and created a block -long park on the west end of the Downtown, which complements City Pier Park located at the east end of the Downtown. The Downtown is an international port, hosting the Coho Ferry, which provides direct access to Victoria Canada. Pine Hill The Pine hill neighborhood extends from the center of Valley Creek ravine on the east to the center of Tumwater Creek ravine on the west. The northern boundary of the neighborhood is the marine bluff and the southern boundary is Highway 101. Pine Hill neighborhood is one of the older central city neighborhoods. The urban character of this neighborhood is similar to several other older neighborhoods, typically featuring 7,000 square -foot lots and standard grid pattern streets. The homes in this area typically are older structures built in the early 20th century, with a variety of more recent infill homes scattered throughout the area. The predominant style of house is typically American Craftsman. The area is generally level, with a slight rise from north to south. This aspect limits views towards the water (north) but many homes have views of the Olympic Mountains to the south. Very few commercial uses exist in this neighborhood. Those commercial uses that do exist are located along the 8th Street corridor. The Pine Hill neighborhood is only served by transit along 8th Street. Sidewalks do exist throughout the neighborhood. West End The West End neighborhood extends west from 'M' Street to the marine bluff, and south A921 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti from 10th Street to 18th Street, and is one of the least -developed areas of the city. Larger -lot zoning (up to 11,000 square feet) and the allowance for curvilinear streets and cul-de-sacs result in a more suburban character. The neighborhood contains five different zone designations, allowing a range of densities from less than four dwelling units per acre to 12.44 dwelling units per acre. Two residential manufactured home parks exist in the neighborhood. Serenity House of Clallam County, Clallam County Housing Authority, and Habitat for Humanity all have developed housing for low-income families in the area. Much of this area remains undeveloped with large tracts of forested land. Two areas in the neighborhood have been set aside and used by industrial interests to store low -hazard waste materials, making those sites unlikely to be redeveloped in the near future. Several newer (1970s to current) subdivisions have been developed in this neighborhood, however not all of the developed lots are occupied yet. Many excellent building sites are developed with urban services but remain vacant. Homes in the area are newer, many of them single - story, ranch style structures. Although the development in this area is newer than other neighborhoods, streets are developed with few sidewalks for pedestrian use. No commercial services are available in the area. Due to this limitation, the neighborhood is not considered highly walkable. The Olympic Discovery Trail spans the neighborhood following Milwaukee Drive from 10th Street to 18th Street. The City -owned Ocean View Cemetery is located at the northwest limit of the neighborhood. Views from this neighborhood are primarily to the Olympic Mountains; the few developments west of Milwaukee Drive have outstanding views of the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Airport The airport neighborhood extends west from 'M' Street to the western City limit and south from 18th Street to the City's southern limits, and is the City's largest neighborhood with 1,217 acres. The primary land use is the William Fairchild Airport. The airport also contains an industrial park situated on the north side of the runways and south of 18th Street. The neighborhood also contains the City's refuse transfer station, recycling center, and compost facility. The Extreme Sports Park is located in the neighborhood's southwest corner. Several large tracts of forested land and farm sites exist in this neighborhood. This is the least populated neighborhood in the City. Appendix A - Community Profile A922 �i Cherry Hill The Cherry Hill neighborhood extends from Lincoln Street on the east to Valley Creek on the west, and from Lauridsen Boulevard on the south to marine bluff on the north. This is an older neighborhood, and contains a large portion of the City's High Density Residential zoning located at the north end of the neighborhood. The southern portion of the neighborhood is primarily single-family residential zoning. The 8th Street commercial corridor separates the two zoning districts, and a second commercial corridor extends north and south along the west side of Lincoln Street. The neighborhood contains three small parks and the east slope of the Valley Creek ravine. Homes in the area are mostly older structures. Peabody Creek The Peabody Creek neighborhood extends east of Lincoln Street to Race Street, and from 8th Street on the south to the Georgiana/Front alley on the north. The boundaries of the Peabody Creek neighborhood are all comprised of commercial corridors, with high-density residential uses west of Peabody Creek and single family residential uses east of the creek. Peabody Creek Ravine divides the neighborhood diagonally from the southeast to the northwest. The neighborhood contains Jesse Webster Park, Erikson Park, and the Dream Playground; it also contains City Hall, Clallam County Courthouse, and the Senior Center. Crown The Crown neighborhood extends from 'I' Street on the east to the marine bluff on the west and from 10th Street on the south to the top of the marine bluff on the north. The Crown neighborhood contains Crown Park which provides panoramic views from the bluff top. Hamilton Elementary School is located within this neighborhood. The neighborhood is primarily a single-family residential neighborhood and contains no commercial zones. Much of the housing in the area is newer and there are still areas that are undeveloped. Ediz Hook The Ediz Hook neighborhood is made up of Ediz Hook itself along with the waterfront area extending west of Valley Street. The neighborhood is unique in that there are no residential uses in the neighborhood, with the exception of full-time residential use of boats in the marina. The primary uses are industrial, with a few commercial activities that support the industries. Several large industries make up the major uses, including the McKinley Paper Company mill, Westport Marine and Platypus Marine. Tesoro Petroleum provides fueling operations for large ocean-going vessels. Icicle Seafoods and the Puget Sound Pilots office and facility are located at the east end of Ediz Hook. The A923 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan t �� Port of Port Angeles owns and operates several industrial/commercial operations along the waterfront, including log storage and bark removal, topside repair of large ocean-going vessels, and berthing of navy support boats. They also own and operate the Boat Haven Marina. The Native American village Tse -wit -wen is also located within the Ediz Hook neighborhood. Ediz Hook itself provides outdoor recreation opportunities through the Sail and Paddle Park at the west end of the spit, and Harbor View Park at the east end. The parks are connected by an extension of the Olympic Discovery Trail. A boat launch is provided at the east end of the spit and at the Boat Haven Marina. Ediz Hook has recently undergone extensive habitat restoration efforts led by the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe. Georgiana The Georgiana neighborhood extends north from the Georgiana/Front Street alley to the waterfront, and extends from Vine Street on the west to the Whites Creek Ravine on the west. Although this is primarily a single-family residential neighborhood, the Olympic Medical Center's hospital and associated medical support offices make up the bulk of uses in the central portion of the neighborhood. Two parks are located in the neighborhood - Georgiana Park and Francis Street Park - which provide access to the Waterfront Trail. The abandoned Rayonier Mill site is located on the waterfront at the east end of this neighborhood. Harbor View The Harbor View neighborhood extends from the Tumwater Creek Ravine west to 'I' Street and north from 8th Street to the marine bluff. This is also primarily a single-family residential zone, with commercial uses located only at the intersection of 8th and 'C' Street. Shane Park is the only park in the neighborhood. Jefferson The Jefferson neighborhood is located between Lincoln Street on the west and Race Street on the east. It is bounded on the south by Lauridsen Boulevard, and on the north by the 8th Street corridor. This neighborhood is also primarily a single-family residential neighborhood, with the exception of uses on the south side of the 8th Street corridor. Jefferson Elementary School is located in the southwest corner of the neighborhood. CIVIC The Civic neighborhood extends east from Race Street to the White's Creek ravine, and north from Lauridsen Boulevard to the Georgiana/ Front Street alley. The neighborhood contains the major commercial strip along First and Front Streets, but is otherwise a single-family neighborhood. Low- intensity commercial uses are also located along Appendix A - Community Profile A924 tIMP, Race Street. This neighborhood contains Civic Field - the City's major sports facility - the Fine Art Center, and Webster Woods, a premier art venue providing unique outdoor art. Lauridsen The Lauridsen neighborhood extends south of Lauridsen Boulevard to Park Avenue, and from the Valley Creek ravine on the west to Race Street on the east. Commercial uses in this neighborhood are confined to the western portion of Lauridsen Boulevard. The Housing Authority of Clallam County manages Mount Angeles View, an affordable housing project. Lyons Park is the only formal City park in the neighborhood. Lincoln Park The Lincoln Park neighborhood extends south from 8th Street to Highway 101 and west from Tumwater Truck Route west to 'M' Street (with some variation). Commercial areas are located along the 'C' Street corridor, and at the west end of the neighborhood along Highway 101. An industrial -zoned area exists at the south end of the Tumwater truck route, where several small manufacturing and construction -related industries exist. Park View Villas, a senior/retirement center, is located in this neighborhood as well as a cluster of high-density apartments found in the vicinity of the 'C' Street and Lauridsen Boulevard intersection. The remainder of the neighborhood is single- family residential. Schools in the area include Stevens Middle School - the only middle school in the City - the North Olympic Skills Center, and Choice Alternative School. The former Lincoln School has become the Clallam County Historical Society headquarters, and is planned to become the Clallam County museum. Lincoln Park is the City's largest park, and includes the Clallam County Fairgrounds, baseball fields, two ponds, and a large wooded area. Big Boy Pond, one of the City's largest wetland areas, is located west of Stevens Middle School. Mill Creek The Mill Creek neighborhood extends south from Park Street to the southern City boundary, and from the western City boundary to Race Street and Hurricane Ridge Road on the east. This neighborhood contains the northernmost portion of the Olympic National Park, and the Park headquarters building and maintenance area. Also located in this neighborhood is Port Angeles High School. Areas directly surrounding the high school are primarily single-family residential uses situated on standard -size lots. The southern portion of the neighborhood is also single family residential, however those A925 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan t �� lots are larger, less developed and are typified by newer homes. No commercial uses are located within the Mill Creek Neighborhood. Mt. Angeles The Mt. Angeles neighborhood extends south from Lauridsen Boulevard to the southern City limits, and from Hurricane Ridge Road on the west to the White's Creek ravine and the eastern City limits. A large portion of this neighborhood is occupied by Peninsula College, the only institution of higher education in the City. The neighborhood also contains Franklin Elementary School. Land uses are primarily single-family residential on larger suburban - size lots; however, some medium and high-density residential uses are located near the college campus. Southwest The southwest neighborhood is located south of Highway 101 and includes the entire area annexed into the City in 2005. Fie"e 4 ni i hu r1. *&parl FroN'� : iiWn auk rrrx..•:ra4t• rur+.•1,00 A✓k-al GertSn?r�e i I t—J L_1 _I _ I 'Feel +J 7.K4 iaJ4�3 I -+Yi r rw ni. .{id war YjY li.ir�yl Wi I M1Y Y� i 1 i.+ .9 ®q Rk ^i}.IPwjdL}YYY... YV' il. }ai u¢e •Irf p.i w`.1.6 Air - . Qlmo Y'•FY&w.YQ Y.hAe nl} Figure A.17 - Port Angeles'station and fire response map. emow► '�� Appendix A - Community Profile �i F—AM-1 White's Creek The White's Creek neighborhood extends east from the White's Creek ravine east to the City limits on the north, south and east. This neighborhood contains a large private golf course, the only golf course in the City. Also contained within this neighborhood is the City's wastewater treatment plant, which now includes a five -million gallon storage tank recently acquired from Rayonier corporation. The area includes the eastern portion of the Rayonier mill site, which is currently unused and awaiting further cleanup efforts. Recently, the City constructed a new bridge spanning Ennis Creek to provide an appropriate crossing for sewer and stormwater pipes. The bridge is also capable of carrying vehicular traffic and the Olympic Discovery/ Waterfront Trail. Housing In 1990, 7,553 dwelling units were located in Port Angeles. By 1992, units had increased by 422 (or 5.6%) to a total of 7,975 dwelling units. By 2004, units had increased by another 797 (or 10%) to a total of 9,479 units. In the decade of the 1990s, the City of Port Angeles grew at a slow rate of 3.9%. The growth in the UGA during the same time was 6.3%. During the period of 1996 to 2003, building permit activity showed that only 10.7% of the county -wide residential building units were constructed in the City of Port Angeles, while 14.2% of the county's residential construction was in rural areas of the Port Angeles planning region. Recent amendments to the Comprehensive Plan are intended to reverse the City's no -growth trend. Currently, the City has 6,834 parcels that are zoned for residential use. Of those residentially -zoned parcels, 761 are available for building. The City currently has a number of large undeveloped areas, and based on anticipated densities, currently undeveloped parcels would provide area for 2,280 additional dwelling units. Transportation The Regional Transportation Planning Organization (RTPO) has designated Port Angeles as a primary center of mixed-use development, and the City's UGA has been identified as a secondary center of mixed use development in the Regional Transportation Plan. Goals and policies in the Growth Management Element of this plan support focusing new growth and mixed-use opportunities in the City and UGA. The road network in the City of Port Angeles is characterized by a gridded street pattern that is oriented east to west (parallel to the waterfront) and north to south. This pattern shifts slightly south of Lauridsen Boulevard, where the street orientation shifts to match the platting A927 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ��� pattern established by the County before City boundaries were expanded. The regular geometry of this pattern is generally retained, except where topography of the foothills, deep ravines or bluffs along the Strait of Juan de Fuca force road realignment. Some areas located in the western portion of the City also diverge from the grid pattern, forming a more curvilinear, suburban -style pattern. Street grades are moderate in most areas, adapting to area topography - which rises from the waterfront and gently undulates as the foothills flatten to meet the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The most unique characteristic of the City's street network is the way it is interrupted by several deep ravines, which bisect east -west street connectivity and results in a limited number of streets that run continuously from one end of the City to the other. The RTPO identifies US 101 as the only Highway of Statewide Significance in Port Angeles. The Level of Service (LOS) for Highways of Statewide Significance is established by Washington State Department of .ti I� ,�'° � •,qac t i '� �' ire .*' �•• �•. �r e • �' A ' 1 �i _...-. A mow! 'Y .. ,# �, u � I r • � I— . Arterial Sir -not Syrslum CdY L rridm — r... 1 .. ,� kp. rrrti ..y..rr Cr � i -.r. � ar.n.rtien r'r rr Figure A.14 — Port Angeles' street system. i r r' Jr i, f 67 M-. A**Me6 r4° i4 Y M M*AWgaIkVbL Ai r 71Ahr .ih A I FM I R A; Mdida dM 0V LA i i n Y R Mph FJUWfb ff1)0h C. rr Appendix A - Community Profile A928 �i Transportation. There are five Highways of Regional Significance through the City, including: • us 101 • State Route 117 Tumwater Truck Route • Race Street leading to the Olympic Park Visitor Center and Hurricane Ridge The First/Front Street couplet Marine Drive from US 101 to SR 117 Lincoln/Laurel/Oak Streets connecting US 101 with the Coho Ferry landing on Railroad Avenue). There is one designated truck route in the City that runs from east to west along the Front/First Street couplet to Tumwater Truck Route (State Route 117) and along Tumwater Truck Route south to US 101. All roads in Port Angeles including highways of statewide and regional significance operate at LOS "D" or better. The City of Port Angeles is served by Clallam Transit System (CTS), the Public Transportation Benefit Area (PTBA) agency that serves Clallam County with a combination of fixed -route, paratransit, and vanpool services. Similar to trends seen by other rural transit providers during times of low fuel prices and strong economic growth, ridership has declined over the past several years. The hub of CTS's fixed -route service is Gateway Transit Center, located at the corner of Lincoln and Front Streets in downtown Port Angeles. From Gateway Transit Center, passengers can board one of four routes circulating within the city or three routes connecting Port Angeles with Sequim, Forks, and Joyce. The Strait Shot, a regional express route started by CTS in 2017, connects Gateway Transit Center with the Bainbridge Island Ferry Terminal where travelers can make timed connections to Seattle, Seattle -Tacoma International Airport, and other regional destinations. An intermediate stop in Poulsbo provides connections with Kitsap Transit for service to Silverdale and Bremerton. Paratransit service is provided to all locations within the city for those who qualify. Vanpools extend the reach of the transit network and are frequently used by those commuting to locations which are difficult to serve with fixed -route service The Dungeness Line, a part of the Washington State Department of Transportation's rural transit program, provides twice-daily service between Port Angeles and the Seattle area, including regular stops at major hospitals, Greyhound, Amtrak, and Seattle -Tacoma International Airport. A929 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti The Port of Port Angeles is responsible for most operations along the waterfront, including ownership of the Black Ball Ferry Terminal, the Boat Haven Marina, and other waterfront properties supporting water related industry. The Port is also responsible for operations at Fairchild International Airport and the Airport Industrial Park. The William R. Fairchild International Airport is located approximately three miles southwest of the central city and serves a combination of commercial and private aviation demands in the region. The airport is owned and operated by the Port of Port Angeles and is classified as a commercial service airport by both Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the Washington State Department of Transportation, Aviation Division (WSDOT Aviation). The airport serves the commercial service needs of the entire Peninsula including Clallam, Jefferson and portions of Mason Counties and the general aviation needs of Clallam and portions of Jefferson Counties. The airport has more than 800 acres of property, with 690 in aeronautical use, and 110 in industrial park use. Two runways are available at the Airport for the needs of larger and smaller aircraft. The Primary runway is 6,350 feet long by 150 feet wide with the secondary smaller runway being 3,250 feet long by 50 feet wide and available during daylight hours only. The primary runway has the capacity for aircraft up to 115,000 pounds. The runway is equipped with an instrument landing system, visual approach slope indicator, eight runway -end identifier lights, medium intensity approach lighting PORT ��_ - _-''- . +lr X71 �4 • in }4S-Rt+il _SIC V L •ry OCAr CA ZP 4 M 1 � L 0311T _ Y 4li�4'Y1_ A'Y f.11J4 AIL � • N�IIeT�G _ 6 _nvrrl�-. url Figure A.16 —Commercial flights to and from Fairchild Airport have ceased, but the facility remains an important part of Port Angeles' economic development strategy. Appendix A - Community Profile A930 �i system with runway alignment indicator, runway and taxiway lighting, and signage. The 2011 Airport Master Plan describes the short, intermediate and long- term plans for facility development and maintenance. A copy of this plan is available on the Port of Port Angeles website at http://www.portofpa. com/ index.aspx?NID=276 Land uses surrounding the William R. Fairchild International Airport include residential, industrial and park/open space. The main landing approach area for the airport is over the most densely populated portion of the City, with the final approach over Lincoln Park located immediately east of the airport. Due to the height of the trees growing in Lincoln Park, debate over the future of Lincoln Park has been an on-going discussion. The area to the west of the airport (the primary take -off area contains the City's solid waste Transfer Station, recycling center and composting facility. Farther to the west, the area is located in the County and is zoned Rural Low and Moderate density and Rural Character Conservation (RCC3) to maintain low-density residential areas in the flight path area. The lands adjacent to the airport on both the north and south are designated and zoned as industrial to buffer the impacts that may be expected from airport use to less intense land uses adjacent to the airport. Urban Services Police The Port Angeles Police Department provides the full range of police services within the city limits of Port Angeles, operates PenCom (the county wide 911 dispatch center for police, fire and EMS calls that represents 18 agencies) and works with allied agencies on a regional basis to include the Olympic Peninsula Narcotics Enforcement Team r.an aK 4 hI I IIPo, CLAL LANI TRANSIT SYSTEM MAp Figure A.15 — The Clallam Transit system provides service covering large portions of the county. Four routes circulate within Port Angeles' city limits. A931 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti (OPNET), police k-9 response and the Major Incident Response Team (MIRT). The police department provides patrol, crime prevention, community policing, a school resource officer, police k-9, crisis negotiators and criminal investigation services. The police operations headquarters and PenCom are located at City Hall. The Department has 62 personnel, which includes 32 authorized commissioned officers, 1 parking enforcement officer, 6 records specialists, 20 communications officers, 1 administrative coordinator and an additional 25 civilian police volunteers. The PenCom manager is a contracted position with Jefferson County 911. Fire The Port Angeles Fire Department provides fire response and advanced life support emergency medical services within the city limits of Port Angeles. The Fire Department headquarters station is located at 5th and Laurel Streets. The Department has 23 career personnel, including 21 firefighters who are cross -trained as emergency medical technicians, with 11 certified as paramedics. In addition to career personnel, the Department has an active volunteer component that is consolidated with the adjoining fire district. City Parks & Recreation Facilities Figure A.18 — The Port Angeles Police Department also operates 911 dispatch services for police and fire operations across Clallam County. The City Parks and Recreation Department maintains over 114 acres of developed park land, another 81.5 acres of undeveloped land reserved for future park development, and 91.8 acres of undeveloped lands set aside for protection as open space. The Parks Department maintains 14 playground equipment sites, 13 baseball and/or softball fields, 9 football and/or soccer fields, and 12 tennis courts. Approximately 10 acres are taken up by community facilities. The Senior and Community Services Center and the Vern Burton Community Center provide a wide range of year -around recreational services. Civic Field provides a full athletic complex for soccer, football and baseball, with lighting for nighttime activities, concessions, covered stadium seating, and locker rooms. The Carnegie Library has been converted to a museum leased by the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe and neighbors the City's former fire hall. The City owns and operates the 41 acre Ocean View Cemetery. Other city facilities include the Feiro Marine Life Center, located in City Pier Park, and a traditional native long house, the Loomis Building and several other log structures at Lincoln Park. The Port Angeles Fine Arts Appendix A - Community Profile A932 Center is located in Webster Woods Park. Two public walkways connecting the downtown area with the residential area at the top of the bluff are owned and maintained by the City. One of those walkways terminates at the Conard Dyar Memorial Fountain in downtown. The City operates a boat launch ramp and floats for boat moorage on the eastern end of Ediz Hook. The City pier also provides moorage for transient boaters. The City maintains the Olympic Discovery/ Waterfront Trail from Morse Creek to the Coast Guard Base entry on Ediz Hook and through the city to the western city limits at Lower Elwha Road. Water Utility The City of Port Angeles water service area icludes the land within the city boundaries, ong with services within Clallam County UD No. 1, 52 Dry Creek customers, 5 Black iamond customers, and one government -count outside the city limits. The City also rovides wholesale water to Clallam County UD No. 1, subject to certain conditions Dnsistent with GMA. In the City's 2002 omprehensive Water Plan, the future service ,ea limit was from Morse Creek to the Elwha iver and bordered on the south by the lympic National Park. rigure H.17 — uncum rurrc 15 une ui rurL wnyeies most diverse activity -oriented parks, including disc golf, a BMX track, a dog park, event facilities, fairground areas, wetlands and play fields. (Image Studio Cascade, Inc.) he current water supply for the City is from ie Elwha River. The Elwha River Ranney Well stem with a minimum yield of 11 million 3Ilons was originally constructed in 1977 with iajor renovations made during the Elwha Dam �moval project started in 2010. This source rovides for domestic and commercial and )me industrial needs of the City. There is also separate industrial water supply line serving ie McKinley Paper Co. Mill. rmwater Management The City maintains all public storm sewers, culverts, and stormwater facilities, including the WSDOT conduits, culverts, and stormwater facilities along the US 101 corridor within the A933 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan t �� city limits. The City is currently making a major shift in its approach to stormwater management, moving away from the more traditional system of hard surfaces draining to catch basins and being piped to the nearest water body to a more natural acting system of allowing stormwater to be absorbed into the earth through the installation of rain gardens and enhancing vegetative cover, including vegetated roof systems. Wastewater Utility The City's wastewater system includes a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) built in 1968-69 as a primary treatment facility, and upgraded to a secondary wastewater treatment plant built in 1994. The plant is the trickling filter/solids contact treatment system. Biosolids are hauled to the City's composting facility where it is composted and sold for beneficial reuse. The sewer conveyance system includes 119 miles of sanitary and combined sewer pipe ranging from 4 to 36 inches in diameter, 17 pump stations, and two marine out -falls. The treatment Ci IV Park Ar s - NAT URAL AWE;+ -FriC+MRHCFM Wk . .v- r °i m -2i rid rk `q;i1 rCd-:ailaa Ir4m" &fel IS&*. "A "M rua Y 4 i ir+uirr ur — —P -w -JN} " W' u'� A%r AW yid Allkfi gd$$ Aa j MdteW hi nM gb4tf'N h 1Lrr Figure A.20 — Park and open -space areas in Port Angeles. Appendix A - Community Profile A934 �i _J Ir4m" &fel IS&*. "A "M rua Y 4 i ir+uirr ur — —P -w -JN} " W' u'� A%r AW yid Allkfi gd$$ Aa j MdteW hi nM gb4tf'N h 1Lrr Figure A.20 — Park and open -space areas in Port Angeles. Appendix A - Community Profile A934 �i Figure A.22 — Port Angeles is working to diversify its local economy, growing marine trades and industries as well as activities related to the city's spectacular natural setting. (Image: Studio Cascade, Inc.) plant was modified most recently in 2014, when the first phase of the CSO Reduction program was completed. Modifications included a 4.9 million gallon storage tank for temporary storage of peak flows of sewage diluted by stormwater (combined sewage) during rain events, a refurbished deep water marine outfall providing improved dispersion of WWTP effluent, improvements to the trickling filters and headworks, and associated elements. The wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) located at the west end of Ennis Creek road, has a treatment capacity expected to be adequate beyond 2021. The wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) is rated at 10.8 million gallons per day (MGD) maximum month design flow, and can handle peak combined sewer flows of up to 20 MGD. The WWTP treated an average of 2.5 MGD of domestic sewage in 2014. Peak system flow capacities average 3.3 MGD (dry weather) with a maximum peak flow of 13.4 MGD. The peak system flow for 2014 was 9.86 MGD. The second and final phase of the CSO Reduction program is under construction, and scheduled for completion in 2016. When complete, combined sewer overflows to Port Angeles harbor will be reduced to less than once per year per outfall location. By design, overflows will occur at the 8000 foot long refurbished marine outfall before they occur at the two near -shore outfalls. One outfall location will be eliminated entirely. This represents a significant reduction, from an average of over 70 overflow events per year, and is a big pollution control achievement for the City. The Utility serves unincorporated areas of Clallam County (the Eastern and Western Urban Growth areas, and the Lower Elwha reservation land) and treats 2 million gallons annually of septage generated in Clallam and Jefferson County that is trucked to the WWTP. The WWTP treats about 0.5 million gallons of leachate generated by the COPA landfill and the Rayonier Mount Pleasant landfill annually. The sewer system serves approximately 3,700 acres in Port Angeles. The city has mostly 8 -inch local sanitary sewers and even some small 6 -inch. However, the city's original collection system was designed as a combined sewer system with storm water. There were no storm sewers in the city until the 1950s. The existing storm sewer system grew in bits and pieces as individual renovation projects and Local Improvement Districts (LID) responded to local problems. The storm A935 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan tio sewers are 6" and 8" diameter due to the steep terrain of the city. The existing storm sewers run primarily in the north/south "short block" orientation picking up catch basins, which happen to be at the east/west "long block" intersections. In summary, the old downtown has combined sewers and the rest of the city has varying degrees of partially separated sewers. The Wastewater Utility employs a Source Control Specialist as part of the Pretreatment program, to better control what comes to the WWTP and to provide education and technical assistance to business owners. Several sources of grease and oils have been identified and remedied to relieve sewer backups. The Wastewater Utility staff operates, inspects, maintains and repairs the sewer conveyance system, the pump stations, and the WWTP. The Utility funds an organized program of Capital Improvement projects that is approved by City Council each year and includes a six-year plan for future projects. Solid Waste Utility The Solid Waste Utility operated by the Port Angeles Public Works and Utilities Department provides solid waste services. Residential customer's waste is picked up weekly or biweekly and collection is mandatory. Commercial customers are picked up 6 days a week. Curbside yard waste and recycling is offered and provided by a private contractor. Current participation in the curbside recycling program is 80% per cent of the residential customers. Curbside participation in the yard waste program is around 50% per cent of the residential customers. The City of Port Angeles owns and operates the Port Angeles transfer station. The Port Angeles Regional Transfer Station began operation in 2007 after conversion from a landfill. The landfill conversion was mandated by the Federal Aviation Administration because of the potential for scavenger birds at the landfill interfering with air traffic from the adjacent airport. This site accepts municipal solid waste from residential, commercial, and industrial customers throughout Clallam County. The Port Angeles Regional Transfer Station does not accept out -of -county waste. Recycling drop boxes are provided and accept glass, aluminum, and paper. Used oil, antifreeze, and batteries are also accepted at the site. Municipal solid waste is transported to regional landfills in Eastern Washington or Oregon. A second issue related to the landfill has been the release of buried refuse onto the beach as normal bluff erosion continued. Two major projects have been undertaken by the City to relocate waste materials and stabilize the bluff erosion to resolve the problem. Appendix A - Community Profile A936 �i A composting facility for managing green yard waste received from the public, curbside yard waste pick-up and biosolids from the wastewater treatment plant at the facility. Yard waste and biosolids are processed then tested and becomes finished compost available for sale to the public. Electric Utility The Light Division of the City of Port Angeles Public Works and Utilities Department is the electric power provider within the city limits. Clallam County PUD is the electric power provider for the unincorporated areas surrounding Port Angeles. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) via its transmission lines delivers the power used by both the City of Port Angeles and Clallam County PUD The PUD has one substation within the Eastern UGA at Monroe Street, and another in the Western UGA near Benson Road and Highway 101. There are 7 electrical substations owned by the City of Port Angeles within the City limits. 0 A937 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan t �� I'l-,", I./l,-, I A ................................................................................................................ Action (Previously Objective) A more specific subset of goals providing measurable and budgetable strategy. Adequate Public Facilities Facilities, which have the capacity to serve development without decreasing levels of service below locally, established minimums. Affordable Housing The adequacy of the community's housing stock to fulfill the housing needs of all economic segments of the population. Accessory Residential Unit A residential unit, which is subordinate in area, extent, or purpose to a principal residential unit and is located on the same zoning lot as the principal residential unit. Available Public Facilities That facilities or services are in place or that a financial commitment is in place to provide the facilities or services within a specified time. 6 ................................................................................................................ Best Available Science That scientific information prepared by local, state or federal natural resource agencies, a qualified scientific professional or team of qualified scientific professionals, that is consistent with criteria established in WAC 365-195-900 through WAC 365-195-925. Best Management Practices Methods or techniques found to be the most effective and practical means in achieving an objective (such as preventing or minimizing pollution) while making the optimum use of available resources. Bio -retention BMP Engineered facilities that store and treat stormwater by passing it through a specified soil profile, and either retain or detain the treated stormwater for flow attenuation. Refer to Chapter 7 of Volume V of the Department of Ecology's SWMMWW (2014) for Bio -retention BMP types and design specifications. C ................................................................................................................ City The City of Port Angeles, Washington. B92 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti Climatic Change A change in global or regional climate patterns, especially a change due to an increase in the average atmospheric temperature. Climatic change may be attributed largely to the increased levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide produced by the use of fossil fuels, but may also result from natural events such as volcanic eruption or earth quake Cluster Commercial Development Retail or other commercial uses, usually arranged in a group of buildings, that create a node of uses with a cohesive design plan and shared access points on an arterial street. Cluster commercial development is characterized by a cohesive design plan that includes at least two of the following elements: (1) pedestrian connections, (2) shared parking concepts, (3) buildings arranged in groups to create a node of commercial uses without individual street access points rather than along the linear pattern of a strip commercial development, and (4) common building design features and signage. Community Services Cultural, social and recreational services necessary to enhance the quality of life, such as libraries, parks and recreation services, fine arts, and festivals. Concurrency That adequate public facilities are available when the impacts of development occur. This definition includes the two concepts of "adequate public facilities" and of "available public facilities" as defined above. Consistency Requires that no feature of a plan or regulation is incompatible with any other feature of a plan or regulation. Consistency is indicative of a capacity for orderly integration or operation with other elements in a system. County Clallam County, Washington. X District A portion of a planning area, which is defined by the primary uses located in that portion of the planning area. Development Any activity which would alter the elevation of the land, remove or destroy plant life, cause structures of any kind to be installed, erected, or removed, divide land into two or more parcels, or any use or extension of the use of the land. Development Rights A broad range of less -than -fee -simple -ownership interests. t � .� Appendix B - Definitions B93 �i Domestic Water System Any system providing a supply of potable water, which is deemed adequate pursuant to RCW 19.27.097 for the intended use of a development. E ................................................................................................................ Essential Public Facilities Public capital facilities of a county -wide or state-wide nature which are typically difficult to site. Essential public facilities include the following: . Airports . Hazardous waste facilities . State education facilities . State or regional transportation facilities . State and local correctional facilities . Solid waste handling facilities . In-patient facilities including . Substance abuse facilities . Mental health facilities . Group homes . Regional Transit Authority facilities. Emergency Services Services, which are a City responsibility, and consists of provisions for police, fire, emergency medical and disaster services. Environmentally Sensitive/Critical Areas Environmentally Sensitive Areas means any of the following areas and their associated buffers: . Aquifer recharge areas . Streams or Stream corridors . Frequently flooded areas . Geologically hazardous areas: . Erosion hazard areas . Landslide hazard areas . Seismic hazard areas . Habitat areas for priority species and species of concern . Locally unique features . Ravines . Marine bluff . Beaches and associated coastal drift processes . Wetlands. B94 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti F .......................................................................................................... Facility Something designed, built, installed or utilized for the specific purpose of providing a service. Financial Commitment That sources of public or private funds or combinations thereof have been identified which will be sufficient to finance public facilities necessary to support development and that there is reasonable assurance that such funds will be timely put to that end. G .......................................................................................................... Goal A general expression or broad statement of desired outcome in the City. Growth Management Act The Growth Management Act as enacted in Chapter 17, Laws of 1990 1st ex. sess., and chapter 32, Laws of 1991 sp. sess., State of Washington. ................................................................................................................ Impact Fees Payments to the city for the acquisition and development of new infrastructure or facilities, i.e., parks, schools, transportation systems, etc., based on a per unit (impact) assessment. Imprecise Margin The area between land use designations is called an imprecise margin. The margin is used to provide flexibility in determining the boundary between various zones. When determining appropriate zoning designations for an area near a margin, the goals, policies and objectives of the Land Use Element should take precedence. L .............................................................................................................. Level of Service (LOS) An established minimum capacity of public facilities or services that must be provided per unit of demand or other appropriate measure of need. Low Impact Development (LID) A stormwater and land use management strategy that strives to mimic pre - disturbance hydrologic processes of infiltration, filtration, storage, evaporation and transpiration be emphasizing conservation, use of on-site natural features, site planning and distributed stormwater management practices that are integrated into a project design. tW� i Appendix B - Definitions B95 i M ................................................................................................................ Manufactured Home A factory built, single-family structures that meet the National Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards Act (42 U.S.C. Sec. 5401), commonly known as the HUD (U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development) Code. Manufactured homes placed in Port Angeles must also meets the following requirements: 1) Consists of two or more fully enclosed parallel sections each of not less than 12 feet wide by 36 feet long 2) Bears an insignia issued by the appropriate federal agency indicating compliance with the construction standards of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) as amended and as approved by the State of Washington 3) Is placed on an on -grade permanent foundation or on footings and piers or on blocks in accordance with HUD's specifications for the specific home with skirting installed so no more than one foot of the skirting is visible above grade 4) Has all travel appurtenances removed 5) Is served by underground electrical power 6) Was originally constructed with and now has a composition or wood shake or shingle, coated metal, or similar roof of not less than 3:12 pitch. Medical Services Licensed professional medical services and retail services directly related to medical services, such as hospitals, physicians' clinics, and pharmacies. Mixed-use A type of urban development that blends residential, commercial, cultural, institutional, or industrial uses, where those functions are physically and functionally integrated, and that provides pedestrian connections. N ................................................................................................................ Neighborhood An area located within a district or planning area where people live, and is defined by the primary type and/or density of the residential units located in that particular area of the district. B96 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti P ................................................................................................................ Permeable Pavement Pervious concrete, porous asphalt, permeable pavers or other forms of pervious paving material intended to allow passage of water through the pavement section. It often includes an aggregate base that provides structural support and acts as a stormwater reservoir. Planning Area A large geographical area of the City which is defined by physical characteristics and boundaries. Policy A topic -specific statement providing guidelines for current and future decision making. Public Capital Facilities Existing, new or expanded physical facilities, which are owned, licensed or sanctioned by a public entity, are large in size and serve a county -wide or statewide population. Public capital facilities of a county -wide or state-wide nature may include but are not limited to the following: . Airports . State educational facilities . State and federal transportation facilities . Regional transportation facilities . State correctional facilities . Local correctional facilities . Solid waste handling, disposal and storage facilities . In-patient facilities including: . Abuse facilities . Mental health facilities . Group homes . National, state and regional parks and recreational facilities . Marine terminals . Libraries . Fairgrounds . Hospitals . County courthouse. Public Services Includes fire protection and suppression, law enforcement, public health, education, recreation, environmental protection, and other governmental services. t � .� Appendix B - Definitions B97 �i Public Facilities Includes streets, roads, highways, sidewalks, street and road lighting systems, traffic signals, domestic water systems, storm and sanitary sewer systems, parks and recreational facilities, and schools. R ................................................................................................................ Rain garden A non -engineered shallow, landscaped depression, with compost -amended native soils and adapted plants. The depression is designed to pond and temporarily store stormwater runoff from adjacent areas, and to allow stormwater to pass through the amended soil profile. Regional Transportation Plan The transportation plan for the regional designated transportation system, which is produced by the regional transportation planning organization. Regional Transportation Planning Organization The voluntary organization conforming to RCW 47.80.020, consisting of local governments within a region containing one or more counties, which have common transportation interests. Regulatory Reform Act Engrossed Substitute House Bill, ESHB 1724 was enacted in 1995 to establish new approaches to make government regulation more effective, and to make it easier and less costly for citizens and businesses to understand and comply with requirements. ESHB 1724 amended a number of laws, including the Growth Management Act (GMA), Shoreline Management Act (SMA), and State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). Commonly referred to as the Regulatory Reform Act, ESHB 1724 amended the Growth Management Act and State Environmental Policy Act to more thoroughly integrate the SEPA process into the planning process. Appeals of SEPA determinations or permits must also be consolidated so that only one public hearing is held. ESHB 1724 is codified by the City of Port Angeles in Chapter 18.02 PAMC. Residential Care Services The providing of residential care on a daily or live-in basis including special needs housing such as group homes, adult -care homes and day-care facilities. S Sanitary Sewer Systems All facilities, including approved on-site disposal facilities, used in the collection, transmission, storage, treatment, or discharge of any waterborne waste, whether domestic in origin or a combination of domestic, commercial, or industrial waste. B98 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti School District The Port Angeles School District No. 121. Service The supplying or providing of utilities, commodities, accommodations and/or activities. Shall Means the statement is mandatory, and the action so stated is required to be done without discretion by decision -makers. The use of "shall" in a statement indicates that the action is imperative and ministerial. Should Means the statement ought to be done, but the action so stated is not required to be done by decision -makers. The use of "should" in a statement indicates that discretion may be used in deciding whether or not to take action. The use of "should" is intended to give decision -makers discretion in matters where exceptions are warranted by such factors as physical hardships and special circumstances or when funding must be taken into consideration. Solid Waste Handling Facility Any facility for the transfer or ultimate disposal of solid waste, including landfills, waste transfer stations and municipal incinerators. Social Services Those services necessary to support life and health, such as food banks, hospices, home health, congregate care, and day care services. Strip Commercial Development Retail or other commercial uses, usually one-story high and one -store deep, that front on an arterial street with individual access points. Strip commercial development differs from central business districts, shopping centers, or other cluster commercial developments in at least two of the following characteristics: 1) There are no provisions for pedestrian access between individual uses 2) The uses are only one -store deep 3) The buildings are arranged linearly with individual street access points rather than clustered, and 4) There is no design integration among the buildings. T .......................................................................................................... Transfer of Development Rights The conveyance of development rights by deed, easement, or other legal instrument to another parcel of land and the recording of that conveyance. t � .� Appendix B - Definitions B99 �i Transportation Facilities Facilities related to air, water, or land transportation. Transportation Systems Management The use of low capital expenditures to increase the capacity of the transportation system. TSM strategies include but are not limited to signalization, channelization, and bus turnouts. U ....................... Urban Growth Refers to growth that makes intensive use of land for the location of buildings, structures, and impermeable surfaces to such a degree as to be incompatible with the primary use of the land for the production of food, other agricultural products, or fiber, or the extraction of mineral resources. When allowed to spread over wide areas, urban growth typically requires urban governmental services. "Characterized by urban growth" refers to land having urban growth located on it, or to land located in relationship to an area with urban growth on it as to be appropriate for urban growth. Urban Growth Area Those areas designated by the County to accept future urban population densities with the intent of future annexation into the city pursuant to RCW 36.70A Urban Services Services that are normally available in an urban environment which include provisions for sanitary waste systems, solid waste disposal systems, water systems, urban roads and pedestrian facilities, transit systems, stormwater systems, police and fire and emergency services systems, electrical and communication systems, school and health care facilities, and parks. Utilities Enterprises or facilities serving the public by means of an integrated system of collection, transmission, distribution, and processing facilities through more or less permanent physical connections between the plant of the serving entity and the premises of the customer. Included are systems for the delivery of natural gas, electricity, telecommunications services, and water, and for the disposal of sewage. W ................................................................................................................ Will The statement is an action decision -makers intend to do to implement plan goals and policies. The use of "will" in a statement indicates that the outcome can be measured. B910 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti Work/live space A living arrangement where the residential use and living area is subordinate in size to the work space. 0 t � .� Appendix B - Definitions Bell �i (This page intentionally left blank) GMA Requirements The following pages list the minimum requirements for the various elements as listed in the State of Washington Revised Code of Washington (RCW) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC). Included with the requirements for each mandated element is a table, which shows how this comprehensive plan meets these requirements. Requirements for the Land Use Element This element shall contain at least the following features: a) A future land use map showing city limits and urban growth area (UGA) boundaries. [RCW 36.70A.070(1), RCW 36.70A.110(6) and WAC 365-196-400(2), WAC 365-196-405(2) (i)(ii)] b) Consideration of urban planning approaches that increase physical activity. [RCW 36.70A.070(1), WAC 365-196-405(2)(f)] c) A consistent population projection throughout the plan which should be consistent with the Office of Financial Management forecast for the county or the county's sub -county allocation of that forecast. [RCW 43.62.035; WAC 365-196-405(2)(i)] d) Estimates of population densities and building intensities based on future land uses, [RCW 36.70A.070(1); WAC 365- 196-405(2)(i)] e) Provisions for protection of the quality and quantity of groundwater used for public water supplies [RCW 36.70A.070(1)] f) Identification of lands useful for public purposes such as utility corridors, transportation corridors, landfills, sewage treatment facilities, stormwater management facilities, Table C.01- GMA Requirements for the Land Use Element Legislative Requirement How requirements are addressed 1a Land Use Element text 1a Land Use Map, GIS database 1b Community profile text 1b Appendix A, EIS and addenda 1b Land Use Element text 1b Land Use Map, GIS database 1c & d Community profile text 1e Conservation Element: goals, policies and objectives 1d Appendix A, EIS and addenda 1j Conservation Element: goals, policies and objectives 1i Shoreline Master Program 1j Appendix E: Stormwater Management Plan 1k PAMC 15.20: Environmentally Sensitive Areas Protection Ordinance 1k Conservation Element: goals C92 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan recreation, schools, and other public uses. [RCW 36.70A.150; WAC 365-196-340] 1) Identification of open space corridors within and between urban growth areas, including land useful for recreation, wildlife habitat, trails, and connections of critical areas. [RCW 36.70A.160, WAC 365-196-335] 2) Policies, land use designation (and zoning) to discourage the siting of incompatible uses adjacent to general aviation airports. [RCW 36.70A.510, RCW 36.70A.547; WAC 365-196- 475] 3) Policies, land use designation, and consistent zoning to discourage the siting of incompatible uses adjacent to military bases. [RCW 36.70A.530(3); WAC 365-196-475] 4) A review of drainage, flooding, and stormwater run-off in the area and nearby jurisdictions, and provide guidance for corrective actions to mitigate or cleanse those discharges that pollute water of the state. [RCW 36.70A.70(1), WAC 365-196-405(2)(c)] 5) Policies to designate and protect critical areas including wetlands, fish and wildlife habitat protection areas, frequently flooded areas, critical aquifer recharge areas and geologically hazardous areas. [RCW 36.70A.030(5), RCW 36.70A.172; WAC 365-195-900 through 925, WAC 365-190- 080] Requirements for the Housing Element This element shall contain at least the following features: a) Goals, policies, and objectives for the preservation, improvement, and development of housing. [RCW 36.70A.070(2)(b); WAC 365-196-410(2)(a)] b) An inventory and analysis of existing and projected housing needs. (RCW 36.70A.070(2)(a); WAC 365-196-410 (2)(b) &(c)] c) Identification of sufficient land for housing, including, but not limited to, government -assisted housing, housing for low-income families, manufactured housing, multifamily housing, and group homes and foster care facilities [RCW 36.70A.070(2)(c)] d) Adequate provisions for existing and projected housing needs of all economic segments of the community. [RCW 36.70A.070(2)(d); WAC 365-196-410] e) Identification of land use designation within a geographic area where increased residential development will assist Appendix C - GMA Requirements C•3 �i Table C.02- GMA Requirements for the Housing Element Legislative Requirement How requirements are addressed 2a Community profile text 2a Appendix A, Els and addenda 2a Appendix C, Measuring Housing Need: A Data Toolkit for Clallam County 2a Housing Element: goals, policies, and objectives 2b Community profile text 2c Community profile text 2c Land Use Map, GIs database 2c Appendix A; Els and addenda 2d Housing Element: goals, policies and objectives 2d Land Use Map, GIs database 2e Land Use Map, GIs database 2f Land Use Element, Policy C6 achieving local growth management and housing policies. [RCW 36.70A.540; WAC 365-196-870] f) Policies so that manufactured housing is not regulated differently than site built housing. [RCW 35.21.684, 35.63.160, 35A.21.312 &36.01.2251 Requirements for the Capital Facilities Element This element shall contain at least the following features: a) Policies or procedures to ensure capital budget decisions are in conformity with the Comprehensive Plan. [RCW 36.70A.120] b) An inventory of existing capital facilities owned by public entities showing the locations and capacities of the capital facilities. [RCW 36.70A.070(3)(a); WAC 365-196-415(2)(a)] c) A forecast of the future needs for such capital facilities. [RCW 36.70A.070(3)(b); WAC 365-196-415(b)] d) The proposed locations and capacities of expanded or new capital facilities. [RCW 36.70A.070(3)(c); WAC 365-196-415(3) (C)] e) At least a six-year plan identifying sources of public money to finance planned capital facilities. [RCW 36.70A.070(3)(d) &36.70A.120; WAC 365-196-415] f) A policy or procedure to reassess the Land Use Element if probable funding falls short of meeting existing needs and to C94 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti Table C.03- GMA Requirements for the Capital Facilities Element Legislative Requirement How requirements are addressed 3a Capital Facilities Element: goals and policies 3b Community Profile 3b Appendices: E - Stormwater Management Plan; F - Comprehensive Water System Plan 2010; G -Transportation Services and Facilities Plan; H - Facility Plan for Port Angeles Secondary Level Wastewater treatment Facilities 3b GIS database 3c Appendix A; EIS and addenda 3d Appendix A; EIS and addenda 3e Capital Facilities Plan 3f Capital Facilities Element: goals and policies ensure that the Land Use Element, Capital Facilities Element, and financing plan within the Capital Facilities Element are coordinated and consistent. [RCW 36.70A.070(3)(e); WAC 365- 196-415] Requirements for the Utilities & Public Services Element This element shall contain at least the following features: a) The general location, proposed location, and capacity of all existing and proposed utilities, including, but not limited to, electrical lines, telecommunication lines, and natural gas lines. [RCW 36.70A.070(4); WAC 365-196-420] Table C.04 - GMA Requirements for the Utilities and Public Services Element Legislative Requirement How requirements are addressed 4a Capital Facilities Element: Goals, policies and objectives 4a Appendices: E - Stormwater Management Plan; F - Comprehensive Water System Plan; G -Transportation Services and Facilities Plan; H - Facility Plan for Port Angeles Secondary Level Wastewater Treatment Facilities; I. Capital Facilities Plan. 4a GIS database Requirements for the Transportation Element This element shall contain at least the following features: Appendix C - GMA Requirements C95 �i a) An inventory of air, water, and land transportation facilities and services, including transit alignments, state owned transportation facilities, and general aviation airports, to define existing capital facilities and travel levels as a basis for future planning. b) Adopted levels of service (LOS) standards for all arterial streets, transit routes and highways to serve as a gauge to judge performance of the system. These standards should be regionally coordinated. [RCW 36.70A.070(6)(a)(iii)(B); WAC 365-196-430] c) Identification of specific actions to bring locally -owned transportation and services to established Levels of Service (LOS). [RCW 36.70A.070(6)(iii)(D); WAC 365-196-430] d) A forecast of traffic for at least ten years including land use assumptions used in estimating travel. [RCW 36.70A.070(6)(a) (i), 36.70A.070(6)(a)(iii)(E); WAC365-196-430(2)(f)] e) A projection of state and local system needs to meet current and future demands. [RCW 36.70A070(6)(a)(iii)(F); WAC 365- 196-430(2)(F)] f) f)A pedestrian and bicycle component. [RCW 36.70A.070(6) (a) (vii); WAC 365-196-430(2)(k)(iv)] g) A description of any existing and planned Transportation Demand Management (TMD) strategies, such as High - Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes or subsidy programs, parking policies, etc. [RCW 36.70A.070(6)(a)(vi); WAC 365-196-430(2) (k)(iv)] h) An analysis of future funding capability to judge needs against probable funding resources. [RCW 36.70A.070(6)(a) (iv) (A); WAC 365-196-430(2)(k)(iv)] i) A multi-year financing plan based on the needs identified in the comprehensive plan, the appropriate parts of which shall serve as the basis for the six-year street, road, or transit program. [RCW 35.77.010 & RCW 36.70A.070(6)(a)(iv)(B); WAC 365-196-430(2)(k)(ii)] j) If probable funding falls short of meeting identified needs, a discussion of how additional funding will be raised or how land use assumptions will be reassessed to ensure that level of service standards will be met [RCW 36.70A.070(6)(iv)(C); WAC 365-196-430(2)(L)(ii)] C•6 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti k) A description of intergovernmental coordination efforts, including an assessment of the impacts of the transportation plan and land use assumptions on the transportation systems of adjacent jurisdictions and how it is consistent with the regional transportation plan. [RCW 36.70A.070(6)(a)(v); WAC 365-196-430(2)(a)(iv)] Table C.05 -GMA Requirements for the Transportation Element Legislative Requirement How requirements are addressed 5a Appendix A, EIS and addenda 5a Appendix G: Transportation Services and Facilities Plan 5a GIS database 5b Capital Facilities Element: Goals, policies and objectives 5b Transportation Element: Goals, policies and objectives 5b Appendix A; EIS and addenda 5b Appendices: E - Stormwater Management Plan; F - Comprehensive Water System Plan; G -Transportation Services and Facilities Plan; H - Facilities Plan for Port Angeles Secondary Level Wastewater Treatment Facilities, I - Capital Facilities Plan 5c Capital Facilities Element: Goals, policies and objectives 5c Appendices: E - Stormwater Management Plan; F - Comprehensive Water System Plan; G -Transportation Services and Facilities Plan, H - Facilities Plan for Port Angeles Secondary Level Wastewater Treatment Facilities; I - Capital Facilities Plan 5d Transportation Element: Goals, policies and objectives 5e Transportation Element: Goals, policies and objectives Requirements for Siting Public Facilities The Comprehensive Plan shall be consistent with the following: a) A process or criteria for identifying essential public facilities. (EPF). [RCW 36.70A.200; WAC 365-196-550(d)] b) Policies or procedures that ensure the Comprehensive Plan does not preclude the siting of essential public facilities. [RCW 36.70A.200(5); WAC 365-196-550(3)] Table C.06 - GMA Requirements for Siting Public Facilities Legislative Requirement How requirements are addressed 6a Definitions 6b Capital Facilities Element: Goals, policies and objectives Appendix C - GMA Requirements C97 �i (This page intentionally left blank) ■ Transportation Analysis The following pages present a detailed analysis of Port Angeles' transportation system, evaluating system performance and likely impacts to it as a result of this comprehensive plan's adoption and implementation. This matrerarElim mmmarms an inhrseEbm and roadway &BWrjak least of smvice [LOS] ammmsmM 9LqqAwnerdad to Part Angeles Compr #kemsi re Plan Transportation BeRrer K for SI- I io map vrMiti the City of Port This asgmnw t i dudes a disnrgan dam seance% baffi€ gwowth fiorermhL edwtrg and fnm w year X39 L3FL and how LOS deSdendes wi be addre_mied by the Tnampw on Ekw wrt DATA COI I EETFCNx! Ewswq Uaffi€ dam wKI ding weekday PM peat Four imasemon coums and zewaW dalyr trifk QUJ" WWq FDMfgffly sagwenris wim aMpMd iiQn tris io■owrg sour ■ Port Angdem MUerfrant aril TnasportrbM bnpMUMONt PUnGM12) ■ Laundsm Roulewwd bmige MpWamnat PrWrtCM4D ■ Nq*mm Pipe kKLuu es USA Can Www Biarras Cogmuszbm PrEpa EIS CW ■ tWMW Traffic Data metal f counts arra* la 2015 AddiUcnally a weekday Phil peat haw intasaMm mrrk at E Bit Street (LLS 191) / E HTM -Wi!t I S f df Comm Mad count vam cordnaed in April 2MT_ TWFK C3f H FORKAST The Growth Managernwd AU requires a dty s- Tranisport36m Homent to irrdude traffic farms that are mrsiMM with Land Lhe Hernud gn h aoxwptiw6 and desa*,e mmk icm at least D92 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan 111 ymm iso the Mum- Prommtsfy. Fehr & Peers dewdaped a dtywide tr mvdd for the Part r ngwiea VkW afi3t and TFampartadon Plain Oka indmda evswq and 205 fnreuwwq Firm For the M35 sDmsww d was assumed the �!Mng lad uses and reQorrd tnp-rnalkirg vAMM gmw at a Fam of 15% Per yea_ These growth a mwr4t wa are in fie with the Com prehersMe Plain kKal population gFcwt:h projections} whidr abo eshn anal gFcmKh bear ffig and MIS U3 ovnu at I-%% Per YMr {Pg_ 3a Table 4 I I rwieww, it *n kl be no+md dud hefween 20111 a El 2MS!, the City popuFation grew from l%iM tc3 an estirrwmd 19,44ff6 a rate of lL4% per Year- BeousP gmmth has been s.,ewhar kxmw than projected, the traff-ic grr wth iareosts dewelaped horn the db7wide travel model nmay be nam dered rorser ouve- RGE} EETION LEVEIE1 OF SERME ANALYSIS The fod a irrtBrsBbas was a nal med f w PM plc haw under � iang and fatemmWd 205 L LAS IM ISR 117 2- US IM CE Lamidsen Boulemrdj IS Linaein Street 3- US 101 CS Limin SSI ! E Mth Street 4- LIS 101 PI Li nmin Sheeq f E 1st Sbwet 5- US 101 CI Linin ifE Front ik US 101 CE 1st SaBe$15 Ram Street 7- US 101 CE Fart SUM) ! S Race SUM B_ LAS 101 CE 1st SaBet & E Fart Stree# } Gdf Cain Road 9- SR 117 {Maxim Crim Level of gra {LOSS) and average inursemon delay vam caa&ted for earn iewsamon by dw ntedr— domiihed in the following sedtorIs- S a'd &9knodum Afedwduhmff Traffic cperaftra at sisrm med iorseMmm am esaluaced unng the LOS nredwd desQibed in Chapter 16 of the Fighr y CWm3L.g Marruai WK A signafined k"fm kwfs LOS is based an the weighted average control delay measured in sBamdi per vaNde and i,mrdes initial dertlaafion dPW queue nrove`up tine, steed delay. and filial Appendix D - Transportation Analysis D93 aoukramm Table 1 surn ani the reladorkshqp bet eery the ootrttd deW and LOS for siffrafraed kftf edtiortF.,. Wsigrreikud fewrmeaon A%9FndbftW- Tra iio mrrdrtiam at unspmLied i'urserfimm are equated Ltwq the method irm Chapter 17 orf the HClll_ Wrth itis rrrmtmxt operamm are defined by the anrerage ooutrd delay per vehiie [nuNtmred it 9eonn1} for &wh nwvenratt timet nwst yield the rE t-cf- ay: F w al vmy sftq:�--mmnAed i•avvwrt tm the av rage ootitrnl delay m oalnrllawd fm the iaprseeton as a while_ At giro -gray or side sueet-armdled iintom mm dw mrmd deW (aril LOS) m c4nAnml for eadr mrmdied rrowerneut the Idk from nmwern em from the nw*w street and the ondre irmrsedtien_ Table 1 swr omrum the rdatian¢Q between delay aril LOS for unsUnWh d rRm90 bom. TABLE 1: ACTERSECMN LEVEL OF SERVICE GOERk Averag a Co ntro I Delay (sero nds Pe r vie h icle1 Leve I of Description Service Signalized Unsignalized Intersection Intersection 9 Short traffE ddap } l&Ota 20A } 3BLD to ]SD �.tier�_ a trtff c vela.af '0.0:C _� 4X _s � kv ��.�� Q Lang iritic demos x 35 -Oto 55A } 25D to 3S0 Edianeudk F } IM 3--90 .. .. i°a:,' �, .J.°•'.�°'': �•.. r.J� r .... 1 .',7'Ch L~°f}] Ni. 263l}o !CS Smndmk The Capital Fadlibes ElOTMA of the Port A ujohm Cmrpfdwrmw Plan std that -all amdal sueem shtil frrd:dm at an average daffy Leel of 5avim {LOS} of D or btu.' fn addrtikwL it rotor that Hi*wap of Sunewde Sqri5urom OM M) should funrot m at LOS D or better per the WW3EX T aril the Pmnnnb Regional Tmnqmmtamn PLwvw g Ugarmdoa LOS Rkmaftm Tra it opaarbum were analyasd Heng the Sin'rdtrn 9 saft�nre pmts Symtm dnrkFbm s ate hawed an pnomdrrg outined in the HEM and dmmbmll in the pteoeding sego far sKpmL ed and unugtalliimed w1ermmmD sTable 2 du ms the LOS result for d -e D94 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan ti esisfin4 and forEcasl>d 21EIS vaemAmlay PISA peat horn_ Lkda ecktr4 anndrtium all it s cp rae at LOS C or 6ettiec Lkider the 21135 fere¢as;t oaditiom several inks along the Us M corridor womid degrrde in LESS a cporAmns6 bLX nDm vrordd emceed the LC39 D diveshdd evaNEt d by Yn31OT and the Peninsula Regional Transportation P4rrwg Orsi TSE OrElPP1TKIINS 51lRIIRL RY—PM PEPSIC MW JA Intersection 1 US10L; SF.L17 to ud (I l"1*0 QdU(1i4�1 5 Ii1MdC�11 r US 1-0 L S Lsn:aln Streal I C 0th Slrc,-i # US M PiLin r -in Mr*K f E 1051NO 1 US 1-0 1. N Lincoln Slrccl ' C rront 7 US 10L -C (rant S�rvcl S mace Street 8 us 1d (E10%"& E Rom SItIMQ f 5 6* CRM11F 101 d SP, 11.72 M.3 Dine Cro &o Ill ryL ppm - 1� ip.,,u 1: � :1 ��� : '�+� 'I IV:Is1VAIMir &19Coriroori0 R:1WdPIw' The folawirq rioadway 9egmem wem ariatsmid for PM peak hour ceder exh" and fvreasted 2H35 cwtdrk" rs L SR 117 horn l &wwe Qrim w US 101 2- U5 101 from Cz-WT am Mad {40ie5t City LirwN to SR 117 Appendix D - Transportation Analysis D95 Existing Conditions 2035 Forecast Control Delay' LOS' Delay' LOS., ss�cl _° C 5111"ll 11 R 14 d SLjnal _ C Ll -L D 5111"ll 25 C 36 a Sizpal 22 C 45 D 5111"ll 21 C 47 a Skjnal 1C A 1_ 0 5111"ll 11 R 17 d 3kUnal 16 g 27 C 1: � :1 ��� : '�+� 'I IV:Is1VAIMir &19Coriroori0 R:1WdPIw' The folawirq rioadway 9egmem wem ariatsmid for PM peak hour ceder exh" and fvreasted 2H35 cwtdrk" rs L SR 117 horn l &wwe Qrim w US 101 2- U5 101 from Cz-WT am Mad {40ie5t City LirwN to SR 117 Appendix D - Transportation Analysis D95 3- US 101 from SR 117 to E LaurkAwn Bo&ieprd { S Lirrmarti Street 4- US 101 from 5 E Larridgen Borderard f S Linmin Street to E 141 Street l E Front Strom & US 101 CE Front Street) fnkrrr -S LirKzM Dzuet to S Gulf Caurm Rood ilk US 101 CE 1st RrBff* from S Linmin Stmt in 5 Goff Course Road T- US 101 from 5 U f Course Road ta N Balker Stmt (East Chy LiriN Level of seivim SOS) vras cAnA ml for ®dr imasemorr by the rrrethods desimbed m die i illrwing seddors, MKWk RW 5eOrreM LM Mirodvti ff R adwey se nm" LES on be measrrd by mmparing bi- drreddDnd trafTi€ vdume to Ilwrrum Servim Vnknre (MWI For Itis walysm nach study segmerit is wed a namiriwm PFA plc hiour sewkp volurm or capacity. IF the actual two-way Plkl punt hair volurrie on the mq nest esmeds the MW, tFer the segfrort does riot Feet die LOS standard WSDQT does not rrrairrtair a praummi for sehmn4 NIWS iar sI I routes. so a SM of Whim detireloped by the Florida qtr m% of Traepertrtim (FEKYbased on the fAhjhway Cqpadfy PlanuW P Edimm (Transportation Re9eadh Boarct ffiG) vras rsed to a®gn NIWs tin the FuadWW segrnats and detanine grade A — F LOS tfrmroldL Th®e FQQT tabes cm be torrid in Appwdor A The Nl3W dwell ld b dearened by iacdrs sudr as arm type (urban or rural cucMmij numbw of Lwm!!;, pr®arm of rrredan, speed: and preurmr of turnn Wrier, LM Sffindwsk The Capital Fauktim Eiernent of the Port Angaks CmrVmtwmw Pian sates tF at -all anerial stfeft SII lima~ at an awf.W daily LEvL4 of Savior {LQS� of D or bre"' In ad*bwL it motes that H4Nhmp of Statewide Signi mr m (M 101) should functim at LOS D nr defter per the VW3IX T and the Pe nsWa Regional Tmnspartabon Plarwar%g - LCK Nmmft The ralndarbm of roadway art MW dve!kiolds and LOS grew es a mmirrianwd in Table 3_ Urider edsiting tadrtierg. A roadway segrnaim operate at LOS D or better" L kkder due 2m5 finecst aondnomL kine r y saprent OA 1[fl from -S Calf Course Road to N Bahr Shmeq %arid opaaae at LOS F. ezeeding the LOS D threshdd established by VWMQT and due Parrearla ftgc W Trampm%a bn Rwwa g OrgarizahwL As dimmed in the following mrm% the Port Angeles TransporMikrr Dement and Capital Facilities Ekaw a contain several poles and objedt vest that wmdd address corgesbon and caparily an Itis corridor- AN ottra rmdwey segment wadd opaate at LOS a or better under 2035 nwditimn& D96 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan TABLE 3: ROJtID4WAY -WGW T OPEIIATMW M — PY PIEAX BMW Existing CGnditiGns 2035 Forecast -N Roadway Segment Bi- Bi- directional MSvI LOS d irecdonal IVISVI LOS Volume Volume 31111.7 horn Marine Dnwe 1 0102.17 C 3 ,`S c. 7D C is SIS 1.01W = 6m Q ro -ifK , 2 Iftw CW aht LifiM" 10 1.2m U70 E L470 2,170 C M ]31 LIS ML Irom SR Ly? to- I" 3 LaurkInani Dauk wd r 3 9&0 L.3 3C D _.2 SC 1.33.0 3 Unr=ln Street 6M 5 E �Id�M UUP_ •L�d 6K*WdI5 # ,°i NA -W 110~1 E Wo 7 IM D 9M 3-330 a ROM so" 05 10L -C front Street'+ 5 irom S Lincoln Sirm to F. .1.500 L.927 D .7X 1.9.1 3 Golf Cause Raved USUd(110* 6 S ww*C SI MaIti}s" IJIM ],9Z7 D 1.1m 1977 D Cmm JS 10 L Irom S tali Course Load to N 6a ken 31 oeel 3.— 3,580 C 3.970 3,5&D Tar,i City Lim hf.: �. MRS � ,nrw �wa'tK�tMM� #Jk dlM�rf�r�d b� Fi01Id1 �wl�*rfta�T� �Md /*A+i[* 'SOWNUbIlin PPPON& A) F*a POW MR 2W N frAMN MEASURES As dsmmwod in the prettio m seEficn the rcadvmg sapnon of 115101 frarn 5 Odf Coarse Rmd ta M M*w Strut vmuld qprrw at LOS F. mKmR!drq the ena6fr_dred LOS 0 tliedidd- The Port Appendix D - Transportation Analysis D97 r4ngEim Trarspxwbrfion Element Crit CapiLd Fadrt ws EContin SOVETaI PdMM grid cbjeEbwEs that vmL d addmm flus defic nnry through paring aril utw-agency Cmrdinaw ■ TFa nWwbSm Bmmik Goal OL PdU 3- The Cfy dmLM as mhkcwa =M for ionf .�..� :.� Ing -e Cams iaLfts Chmk rola L& WL ■ TFansF=rhF§ r Elf =NML God K PolKY 19 - The City shoed wart MM* oOer I ds da id4d& aW P+zkrf r daft' ftir a mmmrd sheet awry dire Cay err the � ■ Tra rrs�ivr �re� �aai Bti �erire 5 - TJre C� rrrT e d say � rr�a� qgwm far ems arms anwir. VM brWF Crud breis Cars w the vwLwV of Gof Cmwm Mod ■ TFangMWU M Elerrrerrk Gaal % cwmfiM 1'I - LJre Cay ww Mwaww ui1h the CuuwX ffTPQ arad Saaw arad federal agvrci5 in the wu* of a AuzQ& fLeww i5 IM carer umkWkV bhe Hevrr of d re H&s Partway and Cumad CmAdar umceptiL Ent of Jwe Sbem ON Ran beeat ffMW W ri MUW (WWW Larrrikr AM&WMQ Wff FW be MXM&kred a; d tae i5 ICU cwDiCbr_ ■ GWAai Faadi Bwr t Gaal A Pdkx T - 71ra OMWOOMFM MVMZE and &MMWES Pfim ftr s&EwM hibww^ a0 dxxM arae a fiawe fry 20 Carzh*w so Dime forth -Wm feud MW rind mmnlk D98 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan City -Wide Performance Measures The adoption of performance standards can be useful for the objective evaluation of organizational effectiveness, with the end result being the attainment of desirable outcomes. Performance standards are observable, measurable, specific measures of expectations that are typically expressed in terms of quantity, timeliness, quality or cost. • Quantity addresses how much work is produced. • Quality addresses how well the work is performed and how effective it is. • Timeliness addresses how quickly or when the work is accomplished. • Cost -Effectiveness addresses working within a budget or saving money. In order to be most useful, performance standards written to address these measures should be reasonable, attainable and when possible, based upon a recognized standard. The standards should be designed in order to provide a result that can directly lead to the determination of whether or not desirable outcomes have been achieved. Within the City organization, there is no "one size fits all" set of performance standards that can be adopted. That said, it is assumed that there are a number of "universal" performance standards that will apply to all City Departments. Clearly, the provision of excellent customer service, fiscal responsibility, stewardship of resources and the recognition of achievement are all standards that should be expected and they are reflections of the values of the organization. Beyond the performance standards that reflect core organizational values, each individual department within the City will have unique performance standards that are tailored to the specific outcomes that are desired. As was mentioned above, these standards could take into consideration the results (outcomes) that are desired, however specific budget constraints, regulatory requirements, measures of success and measures of quality should also be considered E•2 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan Community and Economic Development Department Performance Standards Results Port Angeles Fire Department Performance Standards Results Measured Standard Met? Actual YTD Turnout Time Result Standard Met? Actual YTD Number of building permits issued within 30 days 30 days 90% Yes 5:20 Number of land use applications issued within 90 90 days 80% N/A days 8 min 90% Yes 6:20 Total number of new residential units approved 27 80% Yes 7:00 *Subject to private sector investment decisions 8 min 90% N/A Total number of grants dollars awarded $250,000 >250,000 N/A Linear feet of facade changes approved through 8 min 90% Yes 6:59 the Facade and Sign Grant Program 350 80% *Subject to private sector investment decisions Total number of lodging tax events awarded funding October 15th to May 15th 7 85% *Subject to LTAC & Council Approvol Port Angeles Fire Department Performance Standards Results Appendix E - City -Wide Performance Measures E•3 Measured Result Standard Met? Actual YTD Turnout Time 2 min 90% Yes 1:16 First Arriving Apparatus at Fire 8 min 90% Yes 5:20 Full First Alarm Fire Response (14 or 15 people) 18 min 90% N/A EMS Response 8 min 90% Yes 6:20 Hazardous Materials (Operations) 8 min 90% Yes 7:00 Technical Rescue (Operations) 8 min 90% N/A Marine Response 28 min 90% N/A Wildland Fire -First Engine 8 min 90% Yes 6:59 Appendix E - City -Wide Performance Measures E•3 Port Angeles Police Department Performance Standards Results Parks Department Performance Standards Results Measured Standard Met? Actual YTD Improve aging/existing infrastructure Result Standard Met? Actual YTD Increase Cemetary Revenues Yearly 5% Increase Use of force incidents reviewed and within policy total 99% Increase Sports Player Revenues numbers 5% Increase Increase Senior Center Membership Revenues Yearly 5% Increase Pursuits reviewed and within policy total 99% numbers Yearly Yearly reduction in property crime total 5% reduction numbers Yearly Yearly increase in DUI arrests total 5% increase numbers Yearly Yearly increase in community interactions total 5% increase numbers Meet standards and maintain WASPC Maintain Meet 135 Accredidation WASPC standards Accred. Parks Department Performance Standards Results Legal Department Performance Standards Results Measured Result Standard Met? Actual YTD Improve aging/existing infrastructure 3 Projects CFP Projects Complete Met? Actual YTD Increase Cemetary Revenues $125,000 5% Increase Increase Rental Revenues $80,000 5% Increase Increase Sports Player Revenues $60,000 5% Increase Increase Senior Center Membership Revenues $25,000 5% Increase Legal Department Performance Standards Results E•4 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan Measured Result Standard Met? Actual YTD Respond w/in Public Records Requests standard E•4 City of Port Angeles Comprehensive Plan Public Works Department Performance Standards Results Finance Department Performance Standards Results Measured Result Standard Met? Actual YTD Maintain local streets and sidewalks to safe Respond No Yes Yes standards within 24 Complaints CFP Completed hours Yes Yes Maintain street signage in accordance to Federal 100% 10% of signs Highway Administration (FHWA) Compliance replaced requirements/standards reference annually Yes Yes Perform roadside safety improvements such as Complete Meet WSDOT guardrail, handrail and traffic delineator on time standards Yes Yes installation/repair on time Perform Citywide roadside vegetation Complete No Pending management program on time complaints Yes Yes Meet regulatory permit requirements with 100% Department of Health and Department of Compliance No violations Yes Yes Ecology on time Perform de-icing and snow removal on City o Meet goals Streets as necessary to ensure safe driving Com Compliance within Snow conditions plan Respond to after -hour callouts 30 minutes 90%30 mins. . Finance Department Performance Standards Results 0 ' Appendix E - City -Wide Performance Measures E•5 ''17A . Measured Result Standard Met? Actual YTD CAFR Filed Filed on Annual Yes Yes time CFP Completed Filed on Yes Yes time Cross CFP with Comp Plan Integration reference Yes Yes included Budget Amendments Completed Completed Tri -annual Yes Yes on time GFOA CAFR Award Awarded Annual Pending Clean SAO Audit No Annual Yes Yes findings Payroll and AP Processing Completed Biweekly Yes Yes on time 0 ' Appendix E - City -Wide Performance Measures E•5 ''17A . (This Page is intentionally left blank) Comprehensive A. Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement November 14, 1995 & Second Addendum to the 1993 EIS for the City of Port Angeles 2004 Comprehensive Plan update. B. SEPA review/ Determination of Non Significance #1374 dated May 23, 2016 C. Clallam County Wide Planning Policy, June 30, 1992 D. Background Report Clallam County Housing Needs Assessment; April 1991 E. Measuring Housing Need: A Data Toolkit for Clallam County; May 2006 F. Peninsula RTPO Comprehensive Plan Consistency and Certification Checklist G. Public Surveys and Response Summaries from 2016 Comprehensive Plan Update H. Stormwater Management Program I. Water System Plan J. Facility Plan for Port Angeles Secondary Level Wastewater Treatment Facilities K. Capital Facilities Plan & Transportation Improvement Plan L. Port Angeles Preliminary Park and Recreation Inventory & Year 2010 Level of Service Analysis, M. Community Bicycle Meeting and Survey and Mapping Exercise „r nom, r r f°������� f 1!4!l�,iP; � �>. � ...” �, � �� ��us��p�� f >+� � ��lSi{��l�ll � ��+ 11 u, rifi��, � ���n ��� �} � ��� 1�� s ' � �� �„ °� //��s�'����ii�f ����� �; � ��,x .. �.m. � �� U�t,+ �a��� ` �1� ��� i � ,, �j� 1 „ �, ,,: .� —� :.4e d ,.,. -� __ �„ o� — �,�v� ��" ,: t .. ': **., . �. t2 � P ORTANGELES CITY COUNCIL WASH I N G T o N, u. s. MEMO Date: June 18, 2019 To: City Council From: Shailesh Shere, Acting Director of Public Works & Utilities on behalf of Thomas Hunter, Director ofPublic Works & Utilities Subject: Changes to Electric Utility Port Angeles Municipal Code Summary: The purpose of this memo is to gain City Council approval to update several sections of the City's municipal code relating to the electric utility. These changes seek to simplify sections of the code and/or to update sections to reflect current operational costs and processes. The Utility Advisory Committee reviewed these changes and forwarded a favorable recommendation for the proposed updates on April 9, 2019. Funding: There is no rate impact due to the proposed changes. These changes are bundling existing services at established rates. Recommendation: 1.) Conduct the first reading of the ordinance making changes to the municipal codes: 13.12.020 —13.12.066, 13.12.072, and 3.70.100. 2.) Continue to the July 2 Meeting. Background / Analysis: Several parts of the Port Angeles Municipal Code (PAMC) require updating: • Time of Use A Time of Use (TOU) electric rate charges higher electric rates during busy, high -use times (6:00 am through 10:00 pm) and lower electric rates during slow, light -usage times (10:00 pm through 6:00 am) as a way to decrease peak loads. In the seven years this rate has been in effect, no customers have requested this rate. In addition, very few utilities in the country, much less the Pacific Northwest, offer TOU pricing. For those who do, the results have been inconclusive. Removing the TOU rates from PAMC 13.12.020 — 13.12.066 would simplify City utility rates. • Yard Lighting Efficiency LED lights use less energy while providing stable directional lighting. Port Angeles is moving yard lighting to energy efficient LED lights. PAMC 13.12.072 is updated with the energy efficient watts and lumens to reflect the use of LEDs. • Lockbox Lockboxes provide utility staff access to secured locations to read meters or perform utility tasks. PAMC 3.70. 100(0) is updated to show the current installation costs. On April 9, 2019 the Utility Advisory Committee reviewed these changes and forwarded a favorable recommendation for the proposed updates to the municipal code. June 18, 2019 G-1 Funding Overview: These changes are bundling existing services at established rates, with no rate impact due to the proposed changes. June 18, 2019 G - 2 ORDINANCE NO. AN ORDINANCE of the City of Port Angeles, Washington amending sections of the Port Angeles Municipal Code relating to electric services and charges. THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF PORT ANGELES DO HEREBY ORDAIN AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Ordinance 3085 as amended, and Chapter 3.70.110 of the Port Angeles Municipal Code relating to electric utility inspections and review fees is hereby amended by amending Chapter 3.70. 110 as follows: 3.70.110 - Public Works and Utilities Department fees and deposits. O. Electric utility fees. 1. Electrical work permits and fees. The fees for residential electrical inspections performed by the City, including all applicable taxes, shall be as follows: a. Service/feeder 200 amp...... $120.00 b. Service/feeder 20100 amp...... $146.00 c. Service/feeder 401-600 amp...... $205.00 d. Service/feeder 601-1,000 amp...... $262.00 e. Service/feeder over 1,000 amp...... $373.00 f Branch circuit with service feeder ..... $5.00 g. Branch circuit without service feeder ..... $63.00 h. Each additional branch circuit ..... $5.00 i. Temporary service/feeder 200 amp...... $93.00 j. Temporary service/feeder 20100 amp...... $110.00 k. Temporary service/feeder 401-600 amp...... $149.00 1. Temporary service/feeder 601-1000 amp...... $168.00 m. Hourly inspection fee $96.00 as authorized by the Public Works and Utilities Director. n. Signal circuit/limited energy -1 and 2 family dwellings ..... $64.00 o. Signal circuit/limited energy -multi -family dwellings ..... $64.00 p. Manufactured home connection ..... $120.00 q. Renewable electrical energy -5 KVA system or less ..... $102.00 r. Single and multi -family dwellings first 1,300 square feet ..... $120.00 s. Each additional 500 square feet or portion of single or multi -family dwelling ..... $40.00 t. Each outbuilding or detached garage ..... $74.00 u. Each swimming pool or hot tub ..... $110.00 V. Low -voltage thermostat $56.00, each additional low voltage thermostat ..... $5.00 W. City lockbox for access to electric meter ..... $75.00 185.00 X. Each additional inspection or site visit required as a result of an enforcement issue or safety violation ..... $56.00 1 June 18, 2019 G-3 y. Requests by property owners to inspect existing installations ..... $110.00 Z. Addition of up to four circuits ..... $75.00 2. Electrical work permits. The fees for non-residential electrical inspections performed by the City, including all applicable taxes, shall be as follows: a. Service/feeder 200 amp...... $132.00 b. Service/feeder 201-400 amp...... $160.00 c. Service/feeder 401-600 amp...... $225.00 d. Service/feeder 601-1,000 amp...... $288.00 e. Service/feeder over 1,000 amp...... $410.00 f. Branch circuit with service feeder ..... $5.00 g. Branch circuit without service feeder ..... $74.00 h. Each additional branch circuit ..... $5.00 i. Temporary service/feeder 200 amp...... $102.00 j. Temporary service/feeder 20100 amp...... $121.00 k. Temporary service/feeder 401-600 amp...... $164.00 1. Temporary service/feeder 601-1000 amp...... $185.00 in. Hourly inspection fee ..... $96.00 n. Sign/outline lighting ..... $88.00 o. Signal circuit/limited energy -commercial first 1,500 square feet ..... $96.00 p. Each additional 1,500 square feet or portion of commercial ..... $5.00 q. Renewable electrical energy -5 KVA system or less ..... $113.00 r. Each swimming pool or hot tub ..... $121.00 s. Low -voltage thermostat $56.00, each additional low voltage thermostat ..... $5.00 t. Each carnival ride and generator truck ..... $28.00 u. Each remote distribution equipment, concerts or gaming show ..... $9.00 V. First field inspection each year or a single concession or ride, not part of a carnival ..... $121.00 W. Subsequent inspection of a single concession or ride, not part of a carnival ..... $81.00 X. Berth at a marina or dock ..... $81.00 y. Each additional berth inspected at the same time ..... $54.00 Z. Industrial block permit ..... $2,309.00 aa. Each additional inspection or site visit required as a result of an enforcement issue or safety violation ..... $56.00 bb. City lockbox for access to electric meter ..... $75.00 185.00 cc. Requests by property owners to inspect existing installations ..... $121.00 dd. Addition of up to four circuits ..... $86.00 3. Pole attachment rate. The pole attachment rate shall be $15.85 per contract, which includes all taxes. 4. Connects/disconnects. The fee for special emergency connects or disconnects shall be $80.00 during regular hours and $140.00 outside of regular hours. 2 June 18, 2019 G-4 Section 2. Ordinance 2054 as amended, and Chapter 13.12 of the Port Angeles Municipal Code relating to electric rates are hereby amended by amending Chapter 13.12 as follows: CHAPTER 13.12 - ELECTRICITYSERVICES AND CHARGES 13.12.010 - General provisions applicable to all services. 13.12.015 - Time of use electric rate. 13.12.020 - Uniform electric rate. 13.12.021 - Point of delivery. 13.12.025 - Rate class assignment. 13.12.030 - Schedule R-03—Residential service. i i 03 i c edule n 03 Resi fia e time o f tis r��-viz—a �v��c��nxE'ii cim�ci�rc "" 13.12.040 - Schedule GS-03—General service. 13., n�-Se43oa Genefal sefviee fifne „f„"o "tom 13.12.041 - Schedule GD-03—General service demand. 13.,x-Se43oa Genefal sei=viee demctfid time of tise te. 13.12.042 - Schedule NP-03—Nonprofit. 13.12.0421 Sehe"Ie NP 03 Neopfefit Time of tise fate. 13.12.043 - Schedule GD-04—General service demand—Primary metered 13.12x-Se4 e&le GD 04 renefal serviee demand nritered 13.12.060 - Schedule PS-03—Primary service—Customer owned. 13.12.061 Sehedtile PS 03 Pfiffia. 13.12.065 - Schedule PS-04—Primary service—City owned. 13.12.071 -Schedule IT- 11Industrial transmission. 13.12.072 - Schedule L-03—Lighting. 13.12.073 - Schedule MW-03Municipal water pumping. 13.12.075 - Reserved. 13.12.090 - New or expanded loads. 13.12. 100 - Contract sales and purchases. 13.12.110 - Electrical work permits and fees. 13.12.120 - Contract and administration charge. 13.12.015 - Time of use electric rate. For customers requesting an optional time of use electric rate schedule, the monthly rates for electricity consumed shall be in accordance with sections 13.12.031, 13.12.0401, 13.12.0411, 13.12.0421, 13.12.044, and 13.12.061. The monthly rate includes all applicable taxes. For all time of use rates in these sections, heavy load hours are all hours from 6:00:00 a.m. to 1:59:59 p.m., Monday through Saturday. Medium load hours are all hours from 2:00:00 p.m. to 9:59:59 p.m., Monday through Saturday. Light load hours are all other hours Monday through Saturday, all day Sunday and all day on North American Electric Reliability Corporation specified holidays. Pacific Prevailing Time applies (Pacific Standard Time or Pacific Daylight Time, as applicable). June 18, 2019 G-5 13.12.020 - Uniform electric rate. The monthly rate for electricity consumed shall be in accordance with sections 13.12.030, 13.12.040, 13.12.041, 13.12.042, 13.12.043, 13.12.060 and 13.12.073. The monthly rate includes all applicable taxes. For all rates in these sections, heavy load hours are all hours from 6:00:00 a.m. to 9:59:59 p.m., Monday through Saturday. Light load hours are all other hours Monday through Saturday, all day Sunday and all day on North American Electric Reliability Corporation specified holidays. Pacific Prevailing Time applies (Pacific Standard Time or Pacific Daylight Time, as applicable). .eesefe�:er��t��eefrse�e�srrsasee�:e�e�rs�:e�e�e��:rerrr�.es� . r�� • .. .. .. s . Ms .�eIeeeee:��s�srr� ... - ... .. .. MIATOMMIIIIII MIATARA. IW ... 11111 giffiffiffilli 4 June 18, 2019 G-6 WISTOMMIIII WISTARM FAIRTME ♦ i i • i IM III ' t a Ml�lll June 18, 2019 G-7 ♦ ' A 1 .1' 11 ' t a Ml�lll • i •01,11. June 18, 2019 G-7 lfTf �S . lEfff!*SISiffT�@!li�l.T.�i. . . ........... . ...... . ...... . . .....i. .. . ...... .. ... . ........ lfTf . �Efff!*� �flSifiR!l�lT June 18, 2019 G-8 ,,. pno .. .. .11 ,,. pno ,,. �... June 18, 2019 G-9 a. Billing demand for- eaeh menth shall be based en th- - hE)t+r- Of KVA (appar-efit . 6. Monthly demand ehar-ge between Jttae 1 and Attgzttst 3 1, shall be $4.79 per- KVA for- 95 13.12.072 - Schedule L-03—Lighting. A. Applicability. This schedule applies to all approved unmetered yard and area lights. B. Installation. Yard or area lights are available upon request. Upon approval by the Public Works and Utilities Department, lights will be installed only on existing utility -owned poles for the use and convenience of customers. A one-year contract for service will be required before the light will be installed. Customer ownership of lighting is limited to existing lights only. C. Maintenance. The Public Works and Utilities Department retains ownership of the area lighting; maintenance of City owned lights shall be the responsibility of the Public Works and Utilities Department, maintenance of customer owned lights shall be the responsibility of the customer. D. Rates effective Awmwg June 1, 20149: 1. Lighting owned by the Public Works and Utilities Department: a. 489 40 watts/4,100 lumens or less: $12.43 per month. b. More than 489 40 watts/4.100 lumens, but 4-59 70 watts/7.500 lumens or less: $17.94 per month. c. More than 4-59 70 watts/7.500 lumens, but 289 110 watts/12.500 lumens or less: $19.96 per month. d. More than 289- 110 watts/ 12,500 lumens: $23.16 per month. 2. Existing lighting which remains owned by the customer: a. 489- 40 watts/4,100 lumens or less: $9.94 per month. b. More than 489 40 watts/4,100 lumens, but 4-58 70 watts/7,500 lumens or less: $14.37 per month. c. More than 4-58 70 watts/7,500 lumens, but 289 110 watts/12,500 lumens or less: $15.95 per month. d. More than 289 110 watts/12.500 lumens: $18.50 per month. Section 3 - Corrections. The City Clerk and the codifiers of this ordinance are authorized to make necessary corrections to this ordinance including, but not limited to, the correction of the scrivener's/clerical errors, references to other local, state, or federal laws, codes, rules or regulations, or ordinance numbering, section/subsection numbers and any references thereto. F-1 June 18, 2019 G-10 Section 4 - Severability. If any provisions of this Ordinance, or its application to any person or circumstances, are held invalid, the remainder of the Ordinance, or application of the provisions of the Ordinance to other persons or circumstances, is not affected. Section 5 - Effective Date. This Ordinance, being an exercise of a power specifically delegated to the City legislative body, is not subject to referendum. This ordinance shall take effect five (5) days after passage and publication of an approved summary thereof consisting of the title. PASSED by the City Council of the City of Port Angeles at a regular meeting of said Council held on the day of , 2019. Sissi Bruch, Mayor APPROVED AS TO FORM: William E. Bloor, City Attorney ATTEST: Kari Martinez -Bailey, City Clerk June 18, 2019 G-11 t2 � P ORTANGELES CITY COUNCIL WASH I N G T o N, u. s. MEMO Date: June 18, 2019 To: City Council From: Shailesh Shere, Acting Director of Public Works & Utilities on behalf of Thomas Hunter, Director ofPublic Works & Utilities Subject: Changes to Wastewater Utility Port Angeles Municipal Code Summary: The purpose of this memo is to receive approval to update several sections of the City's municipal code related to the wastewater utility. The utility seeks to: • Raise the allowable pH level for dischargers, • Clarify language regarding food service establishments and general discharge standards, and Fix typographical errors. Funding: No rate impact due to the proposed changes. Recommendation: 1) Conduct the first reading of the ordinance making changes to the municipal code 13.06.030; 13.06.032; 13.06.33, 13.06.034, 13.06.036, 13.06.041, 13.06.44 2) Continue to the July 2, 2019 meeting. Background / Analysis: Several sections of the Port Angeles Municipal Code (PAMC) require updating for the reasons stated below: • Upper pH discharge limit PANIC 13.06.030 State law requires Port Angeles to have pH limits at least as stringent as the state's pH limits; the Washington State upper pH limit is 11.0. PANIC 13.06.030 prohibits wastewater discharges with a pH below 5.0 and above 10.0 making the current PANIC upper pH limit more stringent than Washington State's. Amendment # 1 would increase the City's upper pH discharge limit from 10.0 to 11.0, for all users of the sanitary sewer system to make the City's municipal code consistent with the state's code. Grease Interceptors & Garbage Disposals PANIC 13.06.032 & 13.06.033 & 13.06.034 & 13.06.036. (Wordsmithing changes) These changes are intended to remove conflicting language regarding hydro -mechanical grease interceptors, garbage disposals, and solids separators. In several places, for the sake of consistency, the term "grease interceptor" has been replaced with the acronym "GI". • National Pretreatment Standards PANIC 13.06.041 (Wordsmithing changes) This section of the Code incorporates Federal wastewater discharge standards by reference. Deleting the word "categorical" clarifies that all pretreatment standards, both General and Categorical, apply to users of the City's sanitary sewer system. June 18, 2019 G-12 • Dilution & Mass -Based and/or Concentration -Based Limits PANIC 13.06.044 (Wordsmithing changes) Being able to impose equivalent mass -based limitations in lieu of concentration -based limits will allow the City regulatory flexibility to work with businesses wishing to conserve water without "conserving themselves into violation" of a concentration -based limit. • Typographical errors — Typographical corrections in PANIC 13.06. The Utility Advisory Committee reviewed wastewater municipal code changes which included one additional change to PANIC 13.06.045 Local Limits. Changes to 13.06.045 are removed and will be presented separately to the UAC following concerns on impacts to local businesses. The UAC provided a favorable recommendation for the City Council to adopt the following updated municipal codes and to make any minor modifications as needed: 13.06.030; 13.06.032; 13.06.33, 13.06.034, 13.06.036, 13.06.041, 13.06.44 Funding Overview: The proposed changes do not impact costs or rates. June 18, 2019 G-13 ORDINANCE NO. AN ORDINANCE of the City of Port Angeles, Washington amending Chapter 13.06 Industrial Wastewater provisions of the Port Angeles Municipal Code. THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF PORT ANGELES DO HEREBY ORDAIN AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Ordinance 3397 as amended, and Chapter 13.06 of the Port Angeles Municipal Code relating to industrial wastewater are hereby amended by amending Chapter 13.06 as follows: CHAPTER 13.06 - INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER PRETREATMENT 13.06.030 - Discharge prohibitions. The following discharges are prohibited: A. No user shall introduce or cause to be introduced into the POTW any pollutant or wastewater that causes pass through or interference. These general prohibitions apply to all users of the POTW whether or not they are subject to categorical pretreatment standards or any other National, State, or local pretreatment standards or requirements. B. No user shall introduce or cause to be introduced into the POTW the following pollutants, substances, or wastewater: 1. Pollutants that either alone or by interaction may create a fire or explosive hazard in the POTW, a public nuisance or hazard to life, or prevent entry into the sewers for their maintenance and repair or are in any way injurious to the operation of the system or operating personnel. This includes waste streams with a closed -cup flashpoint of less than 140 degrees F (60 degrees C) using the test methods specified in 40 CFR 261.21, or its successors. 2. Any soluble waste or wastes having a pH lower than 5.0 or higher than 44-11_0 or having any other corrosive property that reasonably could be hazardous to structures, equipment, or personnel of the City, such as, but not limited to, battery or plating acids and wastes, copper sulfate, chromium salts and compounds, or salt brine. 3. Solid or viscous substances in amounts that may cause obstruction to the flow in the sewer or other interference with the operation of the system. In no case shall solids greater than one-quarter inch (0.64 cm) in any dimension be discharged. 4. Pollutants, including oxygen -demanding pollutants (BOD, etc.), released in a discharge at a flow rate and/or pollutant concentration that, either singly or by interaction with other pollutants, will cause interference with the POTW. June 18, 2019 G-14 5. Wastewater having a temperature that will interfere with the biological activity in the system, has detrimental effects on the collection system, or prevents entry into the sewer. In no case shall wastewater be discharged that causes the wastewater temperature at the treatment plant to exceed 104 degrees F (40 C). 6. Petroleum oil, non -biodegradable cutting oil, or products of mineral oil origin, in amounts that will cause pass through or interference. 7. Pollutants that result in the presence of toxic gases, vapors, or fumes within the POTW in a quantity that may cause acute worker health and safety problems. 8. Trucked or hauled pollutants, except at discharge points designated by the Director in accordance with section 13.06.051 of this chapter. 9. Noxious or malodorous liquids, gases, solids, or other wastewater that either singly or by interaction with other wastes, are sufficient to create a public nuisance or a hazard to life, or to prevent entry into the sewers for maintenance or repair. 10. Wastewater that imparts color that cannot be removed by the treatment process, such as, but not limited to, dye wastes and vegetable tanning solutions, that consequently imparts color to the treatment plant's effluent, thereby violating the City's NPDES permit. 11. Wastewater containing any radioactive wastes or isotopes except in compliance with applicable State or Federal regulations. 12. Wastewater causing, alone or in conjunction with other sources, the treatment plant's effluent to fail toxicity test. 13. Detergents, surface-active agents, or other substances that may cause excessive foaming in the POTW. 14. Wastewater causing two readings on an explosion hazard meter at the point of discharge into the POTW, or at any point in the POTW, of more than ten percent or any single reading over 20 percent of the lower explosive limit based on an explosivity meter reading. C. The following classes of discharge are prohibited unless approved by the Director because of extraordinary circumstances, such as lack of direct discharge alternatives due to combined sewer service or need to augment sewage flows due to septic conditions: I. Noncontact cooling water in significant volumes. 2. Stormwater, or other direct inflow sources. 3. Wastewaters significantly affecting system hydraulic loading that do not require treatment or would not be afforded a significant degree of treatment by the system. 4. New discharges of stormwater, surface water, groundwater, artesian well water, roof runoff, subsurface drainage, condensate, deionized water, noncontact cooling water, and unpolluted wastewater, unless specifically authorized by the Director. 5. Sludges, screenings, or other residues from the pretreatment of industrial wastes, unless specifically authorized by the Director. 6. Medical wastes, except as specifically authorized by the Director in a wastewater discharge permit. June 18, 2019 G-15 D. Pollutants, substances, or wastewater prohibited by this section shall not be processed or stored in such a manner that an unintended discharge to the sanitary sewer or the storm sewer could occur. 13.06.032 - New construction. ,A. Prior to construction of a new FSE or NFD, a building permit shall be oI from the appropriate jurisdiction. Plan submittals shall include kitchen fixture plan and kitchen waste plans showing all potential grease discharging lines, all GI connecting piping. The application shall be routed to the Director or his designee for i and approval prior to connecting new construction to the POTW. B. X All new single occupancy food service establishment buildings shall be const with properly sized GIs. All kitchen drains and any other drai: may carry grease -laden waste shall be connected to a GI. A dishwasher shall connected to hydro -mechanical ^r^as^ i^*^r^^^*^r GIs. If a garbage disposal/g grinder/macerator or similar unit is installed in a kitchen_ it must discharge to C. All new construction, multiple occupancy, and food service establish me buildings, shall include a separate waste line for all leasable spaces that discharge to common 2,000 gallon or larger interceptor. This waste line shall be permanently marke to identify it as required by the Director. When a space is leased, sold, or rented to a FSE or NFD, all kitchen drains and any other drains that may carry grease -laden waste shall be connected to this waste line; no domestic sewage may be connected to this line. The property owner shall be responsible for proper maintenance of this interceptor in accordance with the provisions of this chapter. Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Bold, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Right: -0.5" Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Indent: Left: 1", First line: 0", Right: -0.5" Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font color: Text 1 D. All new single occupancy NFD buildings shall install a properly sized GI. Gr Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, GIs are recommended, but hydro -mechanical GIs are permissible. All kitchen drains an Font color: Text 1 any other drains that may carry grease -laden waste shall be connected to this GI (except the dishwasher if a hydro -mechanical GI is installed). If a hydro -mechanical GI is installed, the kitchen may not have a garbage disposal/garbage grinder/macerator or similar unit installed. E. Any FSE or NFD undertaking a substantial remodel will be considered to construction for the purposes of this chapter. 13.06.033 - Existing construction., A. Xvery person owning or operating an FSE without a functional GI shall be rt to install a functional GI. The type of GI required will be determined by the Director, into account cost, available space and gradient, and any other pertinent information. feasible, all kitchen drains and any other drains that may carry grease -laden waste s connected to the GI. Dishwashers shall not be connected to hydro -mechanical interceptors. If a garbage disposaUgarbage grinder/macerator or similar unit is inst, Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font color: Text 1 1 Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Bold, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, Bold, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Indent: Left: 1", Right: -0.5" Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font color: Text 1 June 18, 2019 G-16 after the garbage disposal/garbage grinder/macerator or similar unit. The solids interceptor shall be maintained in groper operating condition at all times. Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.94", First line: 0", Right: or simlilmar- u444 B. Any existing NFD without -0.5 functional GI may be required to install one. The type of GI required will be determine Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, the Director, taking into account cost, available space and gradient, whether the user is in Font color: Text 1 grease impact area, and any other pertinent information. Where feasible, all kitchen drains and any other drains that may carry grease -laden waste shall be connected to this GI (except the dishwasher if a hydro -mechanical GI is installed). If a hydro -mechanical GI is installed, the kitchen may not have a garbage disposal/garbage grinder/macerator or similar unit installed. 13.06.034 - Grease interceptor maintenance. A. All GIs shall be maintained to ensure proper operati minimum, gravity GIs shall be cleaned at least once every 90 days and hydro -nice GIs cleaned at least once per week. These required frequencies may be extended wi 1 approval of the Director. GIs must be cleaned whenever the comb thickness of the floating greases and settled solids is equal to, or greater than, 25 percen the total liquid depth in the GI. B. When cleaned, a gravity GI must be completely pumped out, all solids remova solidified grease scraped from the interior and the structure and all internal plumbi inspected for damage and corrosion. The gravity GI shall be refilled with water prior being placed back into operation. If repairs are required, they shall be performed wit] seven days. C. When have surface removed, settled solids removed, all sides scraped, removable parts removed and cle be inspected for damage and corrosion, and be properly reassembled. If repairs are reqs they shall be performed within seven days. D. The grease and solids that are removed in the process of cleaning a GI shall f/ discharged back into the GI, any part of the POTW, any private sewer, any drainage pi or storm sewer system. All grease and solids removed shall be handled and disposed accordance with Federal, State, County and Local laws, rules and regulations. Treated inside a hydro -mechanical GI may be temporarily removed during cleaning and rete into the hydro -mechanical GI following complete cleaning. E. jn addition to the maintenance required above, automatic be maintained in accordance with the manufacturers' guidelines. 13.06.035 - Grease interceptor additives., No additive may be introduced to the plumbing system that would reduce the effects GI. Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Bold, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, Bold, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Right: -0.5", Tab stops: 0.94", Left Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.94", First line: 0.01", Right: -0s, Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Right: -0.5", Tab stops: 0.94", Left Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Bold, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, Bold, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.94", Right: -0.5" Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.94", Right: -0.5", Tab stops: 0.94", Left + 1.25", Left Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font color: Text 1 June 18, 2019 G-17 J3.06.041 - National rV +^-~ ^~' Pretreatment Standards., The eate�pretreatment standards found at 40 CFR Chapter I Subchapter N 495403-471, and its successors, are incorporated herein by this reference. A. Where a ^pretreatment standard, local limit, or permit limit is expre SIC only in terms of either the mass or the concentration of a pollutant in wastewater Director may impose equivalent concentration or mass limits in accordance with sec io 13.06.041(D)(3) and (E) (see 40 CFR 403.6(c)). B. When ^^=pretreatment standards are expressed in terms of a ss pollutant that may be discharged per unit of production, the Director may either i po limits based on mass or equivalent effluent concentrations. The user must s 1 appropriate actual or projected long term production rates for the unit of produc i specified in order to facilitate this process (see 40 CFR 403.6(c)(2)). C. The Director may permit wastewater subject to a categorical pretreatment stand to be mixed with other wastewaters prior to treatment. In such cases, the user shall i ti all categorical waste streams and provide sufficient information on each non-categori waste stream to determine whether it should be considered dilute for each pollutant. Abse Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Il Bold, Font color: Text 1 11 Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, Bold, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.94", Right: -0.5" Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font color: Text 1 F ormatted: Indent: Left: 0.94", Right: -0.5", Space fter: 0 pt Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.94", First line: 0", Right: -0.5° Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font color: Text 1 information showing that non -categorical waste streams contain the pollutant in question a levels above that of the supply water, such waste streams shall be considered dilute. In such situations, the Director shall apply the combined waste stream formula as found at 40 CFR 403.6(e), and its successors, to determine appropriate limits. D. When a ^pretreatment standard is expressed only in terms of poll Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, concentrations, an industrial user may request that the City convert the limits to equivalFont color: Text 1 mass limits. 13.06.044 - Dilution., Flo user shall increase the use of process water, or in any way attempt to dilute a disci as a partial or complete substitute for adequate treatment to achieve compliance A discharge limit, unless expressly authorized by an applicable pretreatment Stan& requirement. The Director may impose equivalent mass limitations on users where de appropriate to safeguard against the use of dilution to meet applicable pretrea standards or requirements, or in other cases when the imposition of equivalent limitations in lieu of, or in addition to, concentration based limitations is appropriate. Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Bold, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.94", Hanging: 0.06", Right: -0.5", Tab stops: 0.94", Left + 1.56", Left Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, Bold, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, 12 pt, Font color: Text 1 Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman, Bold, 13.06.170 - Supplemental enforcement action. l Font color: Text 1 A. Penalties for late reports. The Director may assess a penalty of $100.00 to any user for each day that a report required by this chapter, a permit or order issued hereunder is late. Penalties accrue beginning the fifth day after the report is due. The Director's actions to June 18, 2019 G-18 collect late reporting penalties shall not limit the Director's authority to initiate any other enforcement action. B. Performance bonds. The Director may require a satisfactory bond, payable to the City, in a sum not to exceed a value determined by the Director as necessary to assure the user will achieve consistent compliance with this chapter. The Director may require this bond as an enforcement response or as a prerequisite to issue or reissue a wastewater discharge permit. Any user who has failed to comply with any provision of this chapter, a previous permit or order issued hereunder, or any other pretreatment standard or requirement may be subject to this requirement. This bond may also be required of any category of user which has led to public burdens in the past regardless of the compliance history of the particular user. The City may use this bond to pay any fees, costs, or penalties assessed to the user whenever the user's account is in arrears for over 30 days. This includes the costs of cleanup of the site if the user goes out of business, sells the business to a person that does not first assume the bond, or goes bankrupt. Users may petition the Director to convert their performance bond to a requirement to provide liability insurance, or to forego any such safeguard based on their performance. User may petition no more frequently than once in any 12 -month period. C. Liability insurance. The Director may require a user to provide insurance if it previously failed to comply with any provision of this chapter, a previous permit, or order issued hereunder, or any other pretreatment standard or requirement. The Director may also require users in businesses which historically have left a public burden to clean up pollution to obtain this insurance, regardless of their compliance history. In such cases, users must provide proof that the insurance is sufficient to cover any liabilities incurred under this chapter, including the cost of damages to the POTW and the environment caused by the user. The Director may require users to provide the proof of such insurance either in response to noncompliance or prior to issuing or reissuing a wastewater discharge permit. D. Payment of outstanding gee;s,, ees and penalties. The Director may decline to issue or reissue a wastewater discharge permit to any user who has failed to pay any outstanding fees, fines or penalties incurred as a result of any provision of this chapter, a previous permit or order issued hereunder. E. Water supply severance. The Director may order water service to a user severed whenever a user has violated or continues to violate any provision of this chapter, a permit, or order issued hereunder, or any other pretreatment standard or requirement. Users wishing to restore their service must first demonstrate their ability to comply with this chapter and pay the related costs of this action. Section 2 - Corrections. The City Clerk and the codifiers of this ordinance are authorized to make necessary corrections to this ordinance including, but not limited to, the correction of the scrivener's/clerical errors, references to other local, state, or federal laws, codes, rules or regulations, or ordinance numbering, section/subsection numbers and any references thereto. June 18, 2019 G-19 Section 3- Severability. If any provisions of this Ordinance, or its application to any person or circumstances, are held invalid, the remainder of the Ordinance, or application of the provisions of the Ordinance to other persons or circumstances, is not affected. Section 4 - Effective Date. This Ordinance, being an exercise of a power specifically delegated to the City legislative body, is not subject to referendum. This ordinance shall take effect forty-six (46) days after notice of the ordinance adoption is given to Department of Ecology. PASSED by the City Council of the City of Port Angeles at a regular meeting of said Council held on the day of 2019. APPROVED AS TO FORM: William E. Bloor, City Attorney ATTEST: Sissi Bruch, Mayor Kari Martinez -Bailey, City Clerk 7 June 18, 2019 G - 20 Twelve Steps to a Compassionate Life — by Karen Armstrong THE FIRST STEP - Learn about Compassion Being kinder, gentler, and less fearful of others." The Golden Rule. Practice honor and respect for the dignity of every human. "Do not do to others what you would not like yourself". Appreciate the contribution that other traditions have made throughout history and let go of preconceptions that have allowed us to consider them as "other." THE SECOND STEP - Look at Your Own World What are the signs of strength and resilience? What matters still need forgiveness or reconciliation? Is anyone excluded from the circle? Are decisions and responsibilities shared equitably? Do all members in need receive compassionate care'? Is any consideration given to impacts on local environment and social issues or to global concerns'? THE THIRD STEP - Compassion for Self The Golden Rule requires self-knowledge. If we treat ourselves harshly, this is the way we are likely to treat other people. So we need to acquire a healthier and more balanced knowledge of our strengths as well as our weaknesses." Free of self-destructive emotion, one is more able to become a fulfilled and mature human being. Setting the self aside takes courage, yet with commitment to lifelong practice, can bring great joy and freedom. THE FOURTH STEP - Empathy Empathy begins in recognizing the reality of suffering in the world, rather than denying or avoiding it. The desire to prevent others from experiencing the pain one has suffered, or to relieve its consequences, has driven countless acts of intervention, service and care. The sharing of grief strengthens the bond of citizenship and reminds each of us that we are not alone in personal sorrow. THE FIFTH STEP Mindfulness Through mindfulness practice, it becomes apparent that much suffering is rooted in feelings such as anger, resentment or envy, and is therefore caused by ourselves rather than others. If self- centeredness increases, one's perspective shrinks; then both compassion and creativity diminish as well. Mindfulness does not need to be a source of regret about the past, or of anxiety for the future. Instead, by helping us to live in the present, mindfulness can provide a strong grounding for action that is timely and appropriate. With each new insight or level of awareness, we have the opportunity for growth in freedom and compassion, and thus can discern a wider range of options. 3O19Governor's Smart Communities Award Winners Smart Vision Award - Outstanding comprehensive plan, sub -area plan or county -wide planning policies. City of Prosser: City of Prosser Comprehensive Plan 2018. The rewrite of the city's comprehensive plan was a large undertaking, not only to satisfy the requirement for periodic update, but also to implement new approaches to old problems. Prosser has taken bold steps to address housing needs, new approaches to inclusionary housing, and innovative student engagement in the planning process. The judges recognized Prosser's broad public visioning process as an outstanding model for other communities: "The visioning process, and resulting plan, were exceptional at simplifying zoning, addressing housing issues head-on, eliminating 20 -year deed restrictions and creating incentive policies for housing." City ofLakewood: Lakewood Downtown Plan. Over 2017and 2O10.Lakewood developed adowntown plan reflecting aspirations of multi -generations, ethnicities, residents, businesses and property owners. The plan envisions awe||-deoignmd mixed-use place to live, work and shop. Downtown is enriched by parks that are accessible and traversable by all travel modes, and offers a rich quality of life and strong economy. Lakewood's robust public outreach and development program were excellent for the community members - the decision -makers involved in the planning process. Smart Choices Award - Recognizing excellence in implementation of a comprehensive plan. |y|ond County: Rural Lands Regulatory Updates -2018. "Excellent example of how to actually protect maounm lands," said one judge. Island County prepared mm| lands regulatory updates in response to overwhelming public input provided in the 2016 comprehensive plan update. Community responses called for regulations that found a balance among economic development, long-term commercial viability of resource lands, impacts to surrounding property owners and mna| character. The county did an excellent job conducting a public process that addressed conflicting factors and tension points, and provided a new regulatory structure that encourages economic development while protecting and retaining important resource lands. City ofBlaine: Blaine Strategic Economic Initiative (8E|)-3017. "This strategic process demonstrated innovative, thorough, and meaningful public participation. This was a smart use of household surveys for targeted community outroaoh.^noted one judge. The SEI identified six strategic objectives, including 43 specific action tasks, lead participants, schedules and performance measures. Thanks to excellent community outreach during this strategic process, Blaine voters overwhelmingly approved a Transportation Benefit District, opened a new downtown welcome center, and adopted proposals to create supportable, effective and holistic action -oriented capital facilities programs. City of Vancouver: Vancouver Housing Strategy. "Vancouver delivered on the goods in the form of a housing strategy toolkit for other communities to use! This is a great use of municipal money per capita," applauded one judge. The Vancouver housing strategy addresses housing needs across a broad range of income levels through direct funding programs, development incentives, zoning code changes and renter protections. This strives to keep Vancouver a vibrant, livable place for all current and future residents by creating and preserving affordable and market -rate housing. It also implements zoning initiatives toincrease density and expand the range of available housing types, and leverages partnerships with the Vancouver Housing Authority, nonprofit housing providers and private developers to meet housing needs. Smart Projects Award - Outstanding project inthe implementation ofacomprehensive plan. Intercity Transit: Thurston County and the cities ofLacey, [Vympio.TumwaterandYem--Tranmit Road Trip Project 2O1$.The Road Trip project was atwo-year program combining technical analysis and unprecedented public engagement to involve residents in transportation solutions. The effort by the multi - jurisdictional authority board launched in response to anticipated budget shortfalls. The potential results include realization of the goal of high-density corridor development and reduction of sprawl, improving access to employment centers and increasing the number of people using transit. "The over 10,000 individual comments, and 66% of votes, validated their two-year public participation process. This was a smart strategy for gaining community support for raising taxes to support local growth management needs," one judge noted. City ofBellingham: Rapid implementation of Bellingham's Bicycle Master Plan. Bellingham's rapid implementation of the 2014 Bicycle Master Plan has created more city-wide bicycle connectivity than any other city of a similar size in Washington. In the five years since adoption, Bellingham Public Works funded and completed over 111 of the 215 individual prioritized bicycle infrastructure projects. Bellingham's public engagement and annual report on mobility allow for a series of comprehensive actions and opportunities to partner with other agencies and jurisdictions, as well as private developers, to maximize the amount of bicycle connectivity that iefunded and constructed each year. Smart Partnership Award – Achievement by a joint public project that implements a comprehensive plan. City of Walla Walla and partners: Blue Mountain Region Trails Plan 2018. Developed within 16 months and finalized in February 2018, the Blue Mountain Region Trails Plan is the culmination of a collaborative effort, involving 30 city, county, regional, state, federal and tribal entities. The plan outlines a region -wide, non -motorized transportation and trails network that spans southeast Washington and northeast Oregon. It stimulates economic development; encourages walking, biking, and hiking; provides more access to outdoor recreation, and increases the overall quality of life for area residents. This is a unique and unprecedented regional effort, where many regional partners joined forces to complete the development of a non -motorized plan, and recreation network. "Impressive effort! A shining star for growth management, mobility and open space pmtectinn.^acknowledged one judge. City ofColville and partners: Colville Downtown Vitalization Plan -- "Colville Together" 2U18.The City of Colville, the Tri -County Economic Development District (TEDD) and the Main Street Partnership worked together to transform downtown Colville. The strong design vision of the plan was assisted by a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) from the Department of Commerce, and a Complete Streets grant from the Transportation Improvement Board (TIB). "As the heart of the planning effort, the partnerships are a benefit to the community, and now the city has a downtown 'public space activation program' attracting tourists to the downtown nearly every weekend in the civic square. Great example of a regional focus to improve the regional community, economic development, and create a central gathering space for all," judges commented. City of Tukwila and partners: Tukwila Village 2018. "This is the definition of a successful public-private partnership," wrote one judge. The Tukwila Village project is a new multicultural and multi -generational community and neighborhood center. The tangible benefits are already visible in the form of commercial spaces, high-density residential housing, shared parking, a new public library, and a new public space for community events and gatherings. The pieces of the project fit together and smoothly transition from one use to another. The design requires an ongoing partnership, so the city and its partners took an innovative approach and agreed to jointly form the Tukwila Village Community Development Association (TVCDA). The mission of association is to improve the social welfare of the community and residents of Tukwila Village by promoting arts, economic development, education, health and community building. Smart Housing Strategies Award — Creative plans, policies, programs and/or actions to address affordable housing. Island County: Housing Element 2018. The county studied housing conditions and reviewed existing policies with the goal of updating the housing chapter of its comprehensive plan, developing a reasonable measures addendum and creating an implementation plan. The research and analysis guided the development of broad goals and policies empowering the county to consider creative solutions. The award submission noted the solutions were innovative out of necessity. Island County is characterized by very small urban growth areas (UGA) and includes an entirely separate island with no UGAs. The results provided unprecedented public engagement from all areas of the county. The resulting housing element brought together and unified very divergent opinions across the county. It became a tool that engaged the community, empowered immediate action and cultivated a greater understanding of the Growth Management Act (GMA). City of Tacoma: Affordable Housing Action Strategy. For many years, the city of Tacoma has worked to tackle its challenges relating to housing affordability, while also working to address a need for a more strategic and sustainable long-term approach to its housing investments. From March to September 2018, the city partnered with other agencies, organizations and community members to develop a comprehensive affordable housing action strategy. The strategy is an equitable response to Tacoma's accelerating housing market, which has increased displacement pressure and the need for quality, affordable housing. It was informed by available data, extensive community engagement and input from a core stakeholder group of eu�ectmatter experts. Judges' Merit Award—Highlighting onomination that the Judges believed 1nbeamodel urshining example ofthe best work inmparticular topic. City of Bonney Lake: Watershed Protection and Land Use Planning (WPLUP) 2017. "Their approach to storm water planning is impressive," was one judge's comment. The WPLUP project represents a holistic approach to addressing multiple goals of the GMA: preserving and protecting water quality and habitat, encouraging citizen participation, facilitating economic development, promoting healthy lifestyles and accommodating growth in urban areas. The WPLUP project is an example of how a local jurisdiction can create a synergistic relationship between these often competing objectives in a proactive manner that furthers the implementation of the GMA. It is an example of how a local jurisdiction can implement the Department ofCommerce's Building Cities inthe Rain. Original: 6/ 12/2018 Updated: 6/18/2019 (Sur Co Topic Status Council Thinktank Done 18 H NPDES —Storm water regulations — City should comment to ecology Permit good until 7/11`2019. Meeting with in progre Ecology. Planning Dept. to work on implementation requirements. Wait on gathering builders. 17 16 16 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 14 14 14 13 H H H E H H H H H H H H H E 13 H 13 H 13 O Increase affordable housing for working families Increase mixed used zoning inccntivize vacant lots Address housing Vacant homes and regulations - Incentivize vacant houses Increase infill development in central district and Race St. Multi -family tax exception Second story (and more) dwellings downtown and everywhere Public/Private partnership — what can city do to help this? Need round table with developers Rentals and Airbnb regulations Town hall with County Code enforcement PADA. PABA, Chamber, Association of Realtors, FDC — how can the city be a good partner — increase communications. round table. etc. Tenant protection ordinance — review regulations Churches — for shelter Prioritize bike -ability and walk -ability 13 O Prioritize transit in the city Page 1 Create affordable housing task force Add Zoning 101 class to Council agenda County is taking lead being reviewed by Legal Council/County meeting Workshop Make it a priority long-term. Planning Commission will address bike traffic. Pass complete street ordinance. Use parked cars to protect bikes from traffic. Clallam County is looking into new routes. Change perception of bus riding. Need strategy and agreement for bus stops. Address transit issues in comprehensive plan Done Class Doni 1\ro In progress No No Done No No In progress In progress Done progress, ordinance passed In progres! Original:611212018 Updated: 6/18/2 0 19 Council Thinktank 12 E LTAX policy LTAX committee looking at policy In progress recommendations to Council. Workin- with county. 12 E Safety on the Olympic Discovery Trail 12 G Emergency preparedness - earthquake plan — long term - critical infrastructure — ex. Hazardous material location 12 G Urban growth areas — coordinate policy with County 12 G Increase education of Council on Zoning Add Zoning 101 class for Council Done 12 G Think how to be proactive to increase communications between Council and citizens 12 H Accessory dw=elling units regulations — adjust for issues 12 S Climate action plan In progress I 1 G Levels of Service for— parks, utilities, etc. (measures) Comprehensive plan address most Partial I I G Weatherization of homes Program ongoing 1 1 G List— Projects displayed at City Hall 11 H Partner with County for regulations on rentals 1 l N PAPA - funding - ensure they survive until negotiations are complete Negotiations completed Done I 1 O 21 year old — tobacco — with County 11 O Coast guard communities 10 H Short term housing crisis — use available shelters (temp) 10 N Create a home fund to build safe and affordable housing 10 N Create a home fund to help make homes energy efficient 10 O Relationships with all (Victoria, etc.) 10 S Stvrofoam Ban 10 S 100% off fossil fuels 9 G utility rates - "social engineering" 9 H 1110th of I % - (for affordable housing) — talk with County 9 H Campaign in a box — Olympia Mayor — increase housing for vulnerable population - get info 9 H Amount of land available for housing Map created by City Done 9 N Culvert rule - how does this affect us and will this be something that we need to plan for (modify culverts impeding salmon passage) 9 O Solid waste pickup — review- and maybe change to increase composting Page 2 Original:6/ 12/2018 I Tpdated: 6/19/2019 Council Thinktank 9 O increase and help facilitate in case of disaster —take lead —to help to get to know your neighbors 9 S Electric vehicles for city —220-30 year electrification of all vehicles 8 G Youth panel — YMCA program 8 H Affordable housing policy -% of construction—how long affordable? 8 H Lobby State for rental regulations 8 N Trees that were cut on Peabody street - policy to ensure this doesn't happen On workplan In progress again 8 N Workplan discussion - topics. Ex. Dry Creek water/PUD in city areas 8 N Bonneville Power - Phil Lusk advice 8 N Is GMA effective - annexation areas vs. services and infrastructure 8 N Volunteer coordinator - find person (Travis Berglund) 8 N Kinder Morgan pipeline expanding on increased tanker traffic on the strait. This will affect us - do we want to address this? 8 S Plastic Ban - straws. cups/etc. 8 S Sewage sludge - alternatives 7 G Elders panel 7 G Values 7 H Use vacant building — Fairview — address regulations to help make that happen 7 O Opioid lawsuit — should we do this 6 E I% for art for construction 6 H Height restrictions (45') regulations 6 H International Building Codes 6 N Campaign signs in the city - sign ordinance update 6 N Calendar - ceremonial/proclamations and important topics 6 O Sugar/Soda tax 6 S Food forest 6 S Zero waste 5 E Chainsaw carving competition 5 N Accessibility of Park behind Swains - for wheelchairs- loose gravel is the issue 5 N Garbage cans being dumped in alleys Page Original: 6/12/2018 Updated: 6/18/2019 Council Thinktank 5 N Locomotive restoration Partial - Asbestos removed Partial 5 N Skill center - should we try again 5 O No smoking rule — 25' from apartments 4 E Parking — do we have enough 4 N Solar in all city buildings 4 N Tourism - create a map where locals identify= "Our favorite places" 4 N Indoor child play - everyone goes to McDonalds and no other options 4 O Methane — sell? For buses — transit — for city buildings? 4 O Traffic signs at unmarked intersections 4 S Sustainability officer 3 N Walmart & McDonalds (sustainable practices - flight hunger/reduce waste) make contact. 3 O Background check on all committee members 2 N taxes on disposable food service items as a way of discouraging so much waste and potential litter 2 N Abolish Dillon's Rule 2 N AWC board - anyone interested 0 N Use rock for foundation of houses B=Housin , E=Economic Dev.. S=Sustainabilit & Environment, G=Governance, O=Other, N=New Page 4 PUBLIC WORKS CONTRACT STATUS REPORT April 2019 / May 2019 (COSTS SHOWN INCLUDE APPLICABLE TAXES) ACTIVE CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS AWARDED BY CITY COUNCIL EXCEEDING $35,000 PURCHASE ORDER CONTRACTS $7,500 - $25,000 AND LIMITED PUBLIC WORKS PROCESS OR SMALL WORKS ROSTER CONTRACTS UNDER $25,000 AWARDED SINCE LAST COUNCIL REPORT (QUOTATIONS AVAILABLE FOR INSPECTION AT CONTRACT SPECIALIST'S OFFICE) CONTRACTOR OR VENDOR ORIGINAL ORIGINAL PRIOR APR. TO MAY REVISED PROJECT TITLE BUDGET CONTRACT CHANGE CHANGE CONTRACT (Construction) AMOUNT ORDERS ORDERS AMOUNT TRI 1-00 (CON -2018-31) 10' Street Reconstruction $2,580,000 $2,523,592.15 $31,374.41 $0.00 $2,554,966.56 TRO1-11 (CON -2018-32) Marine Drive Channel $739,000 $641,372.61 $11,445.05 $0.00 $652,817.66 Bridge Improvements CON -2018-60 Peabody Heights Reservoir Cover $60,000 $50,654.20 $0.00 $0.00 $50,654.20 Cleaning & Repair PURCHASE ORDER CONTRACTS $7,500 - $25,000 AND LIMITED PUBLIC WORKS PROCESS OR SMALL WORKS ROSTER CONTRACTS UNDER $25,000 AWARDED SINCE LAST COUNCIL REPORT (QUOTATIONS AVAILABLE FOR INSPECTION AT CONTRACT SPECIALIST'S OFFICE) CONTRACTOR OR VENDOR CONTRACT/ PO # DESCRIPTION DATE AWARDED AMOUNT *Limited Public Works Process June 18, 2019 L - 1 PUBLIC WORKS GRANT & LOAN STATUS REPORT April 2019 — May 2019 PROJECT PROJECT GRANT/LOAN AMOUNTAWARD DESCRIPTION COST SOURCE & ID GRANT MATCH/ LISTING STATUS LOAN DATA Stormwater $102,000 from Grant Stormwater Grant acceptance City Hall Parking Lot $102,000 DOE Financial February approved by LID Retrofit (design only) #WQSWPC-2016- Assistance 2018 Council March PoAnPW-00001 Program; 2019. Grant No City match agreement in place. required $160,000 from Grant Stormwater Grant acceptance DOE Financial February approved by 1611 Street LID Retrofit (designonly) (design y) #WQSWPC-2016- Assistance 2018 Council March PoAnPW-00014 program; 2019. Grant No City match agreement in place. required $474,300 from Grant acceptance $680,554 Grant Stormwater approved by Decant Facility (including DOE Financial Assistance July 1, Council Feb 2016, grant -funded #WQC-2016- Program; 2015 Grant awarded Feb design) PoAnPW-00368 $83,700 minimum 2018. Agreement City match required in place. $50,000 from Grant Stormwater Agreement in Capacity Grant N/A DOE Financial September place. Grant #WQSWCAP-1719- Assistance 2017 expired March PoAnPW-00121 Program; No City 2019. match required Wastewater Transportation Grant agreement Grant $200,000 from approved by Hill Street ODT $200,000 WSDOT Pedestrian and June 2015 Council Sept 2016. (design only) #LA8992 Bicycle Safety Consultant contract Funding signed. 60% design completed. $1,421,700 from Grant award RCO WWRP — notification letter Trails received. $609,300 (30%) This grant will be $2,031,000 Grant required City match September awarded upon State Hill Street ODT (construction RCO (composed of 2018 budget approval by only) #TBD $203,100 cash and the State $406,200 grant Legislature. funds from a TBD Anticipated secondary source) distribution June 2019. June 18, 2019 L - 2 PROJECT PROJECT GRANT/LOAN .AMOUNT AWARD DESCRIPTION COST SOURCE & ID GRANT MATCH/ LISTING STATUS LOAN DATA Transportation $398,540 from WA Grant Agreement $462only) Grant Federal Lands January signed. Alta design Race Street Complete ,000 (design FHWA Access Program; 2015 contract signed. 4DTFH70IE3002 $63,761 City 30% design minimum match completed. Grant award $2,000,000 from notification letter Race Street Complete $2,890,000 Grant WA Federal Lands June received. This grant will be Phase 1- Lauridsen to (construction FHWA Access Program; 2018 used to construct Olympic Park only) #TBD 13.5% minimum this phase and will City match run from 2021- 2023. Race Street Complete Grant FHWA/ $113,348 HIP Grants accepted by Phase 1- Lauridsen to $3,352,000 WSDOT $568,000 STP April 2019 Council May 2019. Olympic Park #TBD o 13.5% minimum Agreements in City match process. $75,000 (design) and $510,000 Signed agreement Grant (construction) from May 2016. Signed Marine Drive Channel $759,583 FHWA/WSDOT S Surface March supplement May Bridge #LA -8898 Transportation 2015 2018. Under Program; 13.5% minimum construction. City match Grant agreement approved at Council Feb 2018. $1,250,001 from Grant Agreement W. 10 to Street (S. I Grant TIB; November signed. Additional Street to S. N Street) $2,554,967 TIB $839,999 minimum 2017 $100k awarded #8-1-150(009)-1 City match from TIB and accepted at Council July 2018. Construction completed. Agreement in $580,800 from TIB place. This CFP $300,000 minimum project, originally Lauridsen Boulevard Grant City match November scheduled for Overlay $980,800 TIB $100,000 City 2018 construction in #3-W-150(002)-1 funds for non -grant 2020, will be built eligible items in 2019 with the receipt of this grant. Complete Streets $300,000 from TIB March Present to Council Award $300,000 Grant TIB # TBD no match 2019 June 2019. requirements. FEMA June 18, 2019 L - 3 List of Acronyms AIP: Arterial Improvement Program BPA: Bonneville Power Administration BRAC: Bridge Replacement Advisory Committee DOE: Department of Ecology DWSRF or SRF: Drinking Water State Revolving Fund or State Revolving Fund FEMA: Federal Emergency Management Agency FHWA Federal Highway Administration NOANet: Northwest Open Access Network NOSC: North Olympic Salmon Coalition PASD: Port Angeles School District PSP: Puget Sound Partnership PSMP: Pedestrian Safety and Mobility Program PWB: Public Works Board, administers the PWTF Program PWTF: Public Works Trust Fund RCO: Recreation and Conservation Office RCO WWRP — Trails: Recreation Conservation Office Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program — Trails SRF: Salmon Recovery Funding TIB: State of Washington Transportation Improvement Board TBD To Be Determined WSDOT: Washington State Department of Transportation June 18, 2019 L - 4 t2 � P ORTANGELES CITY COUNCIL WASH I N G T o N, u, s, MEMO Date: June 18, 2019 To: City Council From: Shailesh Shere, Acting Director of Public Works & Utilities on behalf of Thomas Hunter, Director ofPublic Works & Utilities Subject: Stage I Water Shortage Declaration Summary: On May 20, 2019, Governor Jay Inslee declared a drought emergency for Clallam County. This declaration was due to the extremely low snow pack in the mountains and record -low flows in many rivers across the state. Therefore, the City Manager is implementing Stage I of the City's Water Shortage Response Plan. Funding: N/A Recommendation: Information only. Background / Analysis: Below-average snowpack combined with drier than normal summer weather forecasts resulted in Governor Inslee's decision to expand a drought declaration into Clallam County. The May 20, 2019 declaration allows the State to make funds available to municipalities if needed to address drought -related hardships and to expedite emergency water right permits. The City Manager is therefore implementing Stage I of the City's Water Shortage Response Plan. City staff will monitor the situation and review the City internal water conservation plan. Additionally, staff will conduct public education and outreach concerning the benefits and necessity of water conservation. City Council will be kept updated as to water conservation efforts. The City's current Water Shortage Response Ordinance, PANIC 13.46, has five stages as summarized in the following table: Stage Water Shortage Condition Action Declaration by I Anticipated Internal Preparations City Manager II Serious Voluntary Conservation City Manager III Critical Limited Outdoor Restrictions City Council IV Emergency Mandatory Outdoor Restrictions and City Council Indoor Conservation V Regional Disaster or Infrastructure Water Rationing City Council Failure Funding Overview: N/A June 18, 2019 L - 5 PORT ANGELES PARKS, RECREATION & BEAUTIFICATION COMMISSION MEETING Port Angeles, Washington May 16,2019 CALL TO ORDER - REGULAR MEETING: Commission Chair Winslow called the meeting to order at 6:00 p.m. ROLL CALL: Members Present: Student Representative Bailey; Commissioners Tucker, Forrest, Kirsch, Milburn, Sinton; Chair Winslow. Members Absent: Commissioner Wojnowski Staff Present: Director Delikat, Secretary Straits & Senior Center Manager Bright. APPROVAL OF THE MINUTES: It was moved by Commissioner Tucker and seconded by Commissioner Forrest to approve the April 18, 2019 meeting minutes. The motion passed unanimously. LATE ITEMS: None. PUBLIC COMMENT: All public comment was made to express opinions regarding the protection of the Liberty Bell within Veteran's Park. Speakers included Gary Velie, Jim McEntire, Susan Hillgren, Bill Benedict, Strait View Credit Union, Karen Rogers and Brendan Meyer. FINANCE & PACKET ITEMS: Director Delikat reviewed the current revenue and expenditure report. LEGISLATION: 1. Veteran's Memorial Park- Director Delikat updated Commissioners on the process that has taken place since the previous April 18th Commission meeting. He explained the final motion that was made at the previous meeting, details of the first sub -committee meeting, and the outcome that lead to a community meeting with five selected individuals that spoke during the April 18th Public Comment period. After Delikat's comments, Commissioner Winslow spoke on behalf of the Commissioners Sub -Committee that led to their determination and outcome. During the process it was ultimately decided on that the protection of the Liberty Bell is the responsibility of the Parks and Recreation Department, not City Council. Commissioner Sinton presented the following recommendation: The Parks and Recreation Director should proceed with a project to install an ornamental security fence around the Liberty Bell at Veteran's Memorial Park, not the park itself. The project scope includes an ornamental security fence from pillar to pillar around the Liberty Bell that compliments the park design and neighborhood structures. The fence should include a locking gate of ornamental design, in keeping with the theme of the park. Additional features, which could be installed in tandem with the fence or in later phases, include lighting for security and aesthetic purposes, and a security camera connected to the City system. Funding for the purchase and installation of the fence, lighting and camera system must be sourced from community donations and/or other sources that do not negatively impact the Parks and Recreation budget, staffing hours, and prioritized list of capital maintenance projects. Final approval for the design will be the responsibility of the Parks and Recreation Director. GUEST SPEAKERS: Aubry Bright, Senior Center Manager: Manager Bright gave an update to the Commission regarding the current state of the Senior Center. She discussed the observations she's made during her first five months, the projects that will occur during the next six months, and the importance of the Senior Center volunteers. She also discussed upcoming events and answered questions held by the commissioners. DIRECTOR'S REPORT: 1. Park Maintenance Shop- Delikat discussed the possibility of purchasing a new Parks Maintenance building from Platypus Marine. He will be taking a proposal to City Council in June. 2. Facility Use Agreement- Delikat announced a new, 5 -year renewable Facility Use Agreement with MACK Athletics, Inc. that he will be taking to City Council on May 21, 2019. 3. Generation II Dream Playground- The playground design unveiling will be held on June 5th at the Vern Burton Center. 4. Public Restrooms- Delikat announced his May 215' presentation to the Council regarding public restrooms plans and encouraged Commissioners to attend. S. Capital Facilities Plan- Delikat discussed the updated version of the CFP that will be discussed at an upcoming City Council Work Session. 6. Flag Pole- A flag poles at City Pier was recently hit by a vehicle. A new flag pole will be purchased to replace the removed pole. Page 1 of 2 June 18, 2019 L - 6 7. Board of Directors- Delikat mentioned that the Senior Center Board of Directors were recently recognized during Volunteer Appreciation Month during a City Council meeting for all of their efforts during the six month absence of a Senior Center Manager. 8. Ordinances- Delikat discussed ordinances to occur during summer hiatus, including the name change of West End to Pebble Beach Park and tobacco -free parks and facilities. 9. 2nd Annual Day of Play- Intern Hailey Lester discussed the changes and improvements made to this year's Day of Play event happening on July 23rd, including passports, prizes and new partners. Questions/Comments: None. ADJOURNMENT: Chairperson Winslow adjourned the meeting at 7:20 p.m. The next meeting is September 19, 2019, at 6:00 p.m. in 1he CityC uracil Chambers. k 0 NKAA Iris Winslow, Chairperson essi a Straits, Secretary June 18, 2019 L -=ffage 2of2 t2 � P ORTANGELES CITY COUNCIL WASH I N G T o N, u. s. MEMO Date: June 18, 2019 To: City Council From: Shailesh Shere, Acting Director of Public Works & Utilities on behalf of Thomas Hunter, Director ofPublic Works & Utilities Subject: Surplus 2009 Tar Heater Trailer, Equipment #940 Summary: Equipment #940 Cimline Tar Heater Trailer is no longer needed for future City operations; it has been replaced by newer equipment. Funding: N/A Recommendation: Declare Equipment #940 as surplus, and authorize the Public Works Director to dispose of it per established procedures. Background / Analysis: In 2009, Equipment #940 (Cimline Tar Heater Trailer) was purchased to seal the seams of new asphalt patches. The unit is a trailer -mounted, diesel -fired tar melting pot and is used by hand -pouring melted tar onto the seams of an asphalt patch. In 2013 the City purchased Equipment #1341 to promote the Street Departments new Asphalt Crack Sealing Program. This unit is also a trailer -mounted, diesel -fired tar melting pot. The new equipment incorporates additional features including heated hoses, a distribution nozzle and an air compressor for debris removal which provide improved sealing. By purchasing equipment #1341, the Cimline Tar Heater Trailer was rendered obsolete and is no longer needed by the City. Funding Overview: N/A June 18, 2019 L - 8 June 18, 2019 L - 9 2019 Building Report - Number of Permits Issued JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC Total NEW CONSTRUCTION 1 1 2 Comm. REPAIR AND ALTERATION 23 8 19 11 14 - - - - - - - 75 NEW CONST. - - - 2 - 2 Ind. REPAIR AND ALTERATION 1 1 2 1 1 6 NEW CONSTRUCTION - - - - 0 Public REPAIR AND ALTERATION 1 1 NEW MULTI FAMILY - - - - 0 NEW MANUFACTURED HOME - 1 1 - 2 4 Res. NEW SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENCE 5 1 3 2 1 12 NEW ACCESSORY STRUCTURE 1 2 1 - 2 6 REPAIR AND ALTERATION 62 37 48 56 60 263 DEMOLITION AND MOVING - 2 1 - 3 - - - - - - 6 Total: 92 53 75 74 83 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 377 CERTIFICATES OF OCCUPANCY 4 1 1 1 5 5 - - - - - - - 16 2019 Building Report - Permit Valuation JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC Total NEW CONSTRUCTION - $9,000.00 - $54,000.00 $ 63,000 Comm. REPAIR AND ALTERATION $1,401,903.00 $605,596.00 $1,105,779.00 $239,741.00 $4,483,127.00 $ 7,836,146 NEW CONST. - - $360,000.00 $ 360,000 Ind. REPAIR AND ALTERATION $3,000.00 $500.00 $350.00 $60,000.00 $75,000.00 $ 138,850 NEW CONSTRUCTION - - $ - Public REPAIR AND ALTERATION $7,000.00 $ 7,000 NEW MULTI FAMILY $ NEW MANUFACTURED HOME $209,425.001 $60,000.00 $455,098.00 $ 724,523 Res. NEW SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENCE $664,407.00 $135,130.001 $510,021.00 $505,000.00 $95,200.00 $ 1,909,758 NEW ACCESSORY STRUCTURE $29,317.00 $12,775.00 $23,000.00 - $62,000.00 $ 127,092 REPAIR AND ALTERATION $717,165.00 $250,059.00 $315,246.00 ' $519,982.00 $590,491.00 $ 2,392,943 DEMOLITION AND MOVING - $0.00 $7,000.00 - $26,000.00 $ 33,000 Total: $ 2,815,792 $1,222,485 $ 2,021,396 $1,745,723 $ 5,786,916 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $13,592,312 June 18, 2019 L - 9 ANNUAL REPORT YEAR 2018 CITY OF PORT ANGELES FIRE DEPARTMENT 102 EAST STH STREET PORT ANGELES. WA 98362 360.4 17,4 6 5 5 THE CITY OF -0� TNGELES -AW A S H I N G T O N City Council Sissi Bruch, Ph.D Mayor Kate Dexter Deputy Mayor Mike French Councilmember Cherie Kidd Councilmember Michael Merideth Councilmember Jim Moran, MA, CLU, ChFC Councilmember Lindsey Schromen-Wawrin Councilmember Nathan West City Manager ANNUAL REPORT YEAR 2018 Contents A Message from the Chief .................................................... 1 Public Safety Advisory Board .............................................. 2 2018 Organizational Chart .................................................. 3 StrategicGoals................................................................... 5 Fire Department Goals ........................................................ 6 Goal Supported Accomplishments ...................................... 8 Performance Measures....................................................... 9 Performance Indicators.................................................... 11 DivisionReports................................................................ 19 Personnel Highlights......................................................... 27 Department Highlights..................................................... 29 Paramedic Tyler Gage proudly takes a photo beside the flag he made for the Fire Hall. ANNUAL REPORT YEAR 2018 A Message From The Chief It is my pleasure to once again write a Fire Chief's message for the Port Angeles Fire Department Annual Report. I wear a Port Angeles Fire Department uniform every day. This is partly because I have no sense of style whatsoever. I have embarrassed my poor, long-suffering wife Teresa way too many times when I have attempted to leave the house in what I thought was a perfectly acceptable combination of clothing. Teresa's patience for me, and for the demands of the job, has been incredible and I will always be in debt for her support, but that is another story... Anyway, I wear the uniform every day and I am proud to do so. Mainly I am proud to wear it because on an almost daily basis I am stopped by someone who recognizes the uniform and cannot wait to tell me about some fantastic act of kindness or compassion that they either witnessed or received from a member of the Port Angeles Fire Department. I am not exaggerating when I say that this. It happens all the time. Hearing these stories is incredibly gratifying. I am humbled by the praise that the Department personnel receive, but to be honest, I am not terribly surprised. The citizens of Port Angeles are lucky to be served by some of the most professional, competent, compassionate and truly nice fire department personnel that I have ever had the pleasure to serve with. This has not happened by accident. We have set a standard for recruit personnel that is difficult to achieve. This has meant that all of our personnel have had to work with reduced staffing because we refuse to lower the bar and hire folks simply to fill empty positions. Everyone in the Department has pitched in and agreed that they would rather work harder and wait longer than hire the wrong person. We believe that this short term pain is worth the long term gain and I can tell you that the positive, unsolicited comments I receive from the public are an indication that we are headed in the correct direction. I am well aware that we are not in this alone. This Department would not be what it is without the support of our families and without the support of a very dedicated cadre of volunteers. I am not very good at showing my gratitude — I sincerely hope that all of our personnel, all of our family members and all of our volunteers know how very much I value and appreciate their dedication and support. So, please enjoy our 2018 Annual Report. There are many pages of information that illustrate just how much the Department accomplished during the year, but there are not nearly enough pages to accurately record the thousands of positive interactions that our personnel have had with our citizens. - Ken Dubuc PAGE 1 ANNUAL REPORT YEAR 2018 Public Safety Advisory Board It is clear I think to all of us that the mission and conduct of Public Safety changes over the years as society changes. It is, or course, critical that Police and Fire Departments be in touch with the nature these local, regional and national changes and adjust their operations accordingly overtime. As members of the Port Angeles Public Safety Advisory Board, we follow the evolution of both Police, Fire and Medical response as part of our citizen liaison function. As such we have a great deal confidence that the critical aspects of Public Safety in Port Angeles not only adjust to these changing trends, but are often ahead of the curve. The insight, dedication and professional expertise of all who serve our Police and Fire Departments protects our quality of life by protecting our safety to live in a free society. On the Fire and Medical side of Public Safety, it is noteworthy that the early emphasis on prevention over the years and the proactive and ongoing inspection programs have resulted in a drastically reduced instance of structure fires and shifted much of the emphasis to medical response. Commercial building safety is a large part of that emphasis as the close proximity of many commercial buildings, particularly in the downtown area, can create catastrophic fire dangers, something now extremely rare as a result of our diligent prevention programs. On the Police side of Public Safety, embracing the concept of "community policing" is also preemptive by anticipating issues and circumstances that can lead to criminal activity and addressing them in many cases before they become dangerous. Often this approach has been instrumental in reducing crime rates in general and creating a safer environment and quality of life for us all. While these and many other valuable and insightful changes over the years have added immeasurably to effectively reducing crime and injury to our citizens, the everyday hard work and diligence of our Police and Fires professionals goes on. There is no substitute for training and hard work. On behalf of the Public Safety Advisory Board, it is an honor to serve on this important Board and to support our local Public Safety professionals. Alan Barnard Chairman Port Angeles Public Safety Advisory Board PAGE 2 Ken Dubuc Fire Chief ' [' Catherine Dewey Administrative Assistant Michael Keith Bogues Sanders Assistant Chief/ Assistant Chief Operations J Fire Marshal Jamie Mason Kelly Ziegler Terry Reid Captain Captain Captain A Shift BS Shift C Shift » teremy ,FT Andrew Bryant Kroh •' Church Cooper Lieutenant Lieutenant Lieutenant Travis John Hall ToGerman McFarland Firefighter Firefighter firefighter f]] Pararnedic EMT Pararnedic Mark Doug Eaton Dayvid Karjalamen Firefighter Ryp!nski Firefighter Paramedic F, rcf iZh to r paramedic Paramedic Daniel Mike Bruce Montana Ingrah m 5yrrrjnds F�icfighter Firefighter Fc c ibhter Paramedic Pararnedic EMT Chase Laubach Tyier Gage Geese Firefighter Firefighter �nardata, Ga me.7ic Pararnedic ar, lite !EMT Ty4er iaeot»an Harry Hause Firefighter Frreflgh to r Paramedic EMT rpSeng iy!er VV,1dcman Rrefightcr Pararied+c Mike Adamich Volunteer Captain Mike Hansen Trevor Warren Volunteer Volunteer Lieutenant Lieutenant Scott Janes'� Shaunna Olson Firefighter/EMT EMT Patricia Reifenstahl Jillian Munger Firefighter/EMT Firefighter/EMT 11 Andrew Pittman IM Chase Adamich Firefighter/EMT Firefighter/EMT Tim Davis is Michael Wheeler Firefighter/EMT IN Firefighter/EMT Phillip VanKessel Andrew Lyon EMT Is EMT Jaisal White'� Sanad Olwan EMT EMT Anthony Quinones EMT ANNUAL REPORT YEAR 2018 Strategic Goals Public Safety • All calls for assistance are responded to in a timely manner by highly trained personnel with necessary resources that are properly deployed. • Appropriate disaster preparedness planning and training is provided for all levels of City Government. • Complete interoperability is achieved through the appropriate provision of equipment and technology that enhances agency effectiveness and employee safety. • Prevention and volunteer programs are an integral part of the public safety mission. • Public, private and intergovernmental partnerships are actively pursued to maximize the effectiveness of public safety resources. PAGE 5 ANNUAL REPORT YEAR 2018 Focus Area: Preserving and Protecting Our Assets Physical Infrastructure • Maintain facilities so that they are safe and close to original condition Financial Infrastructure • Continually explore potential grant funding opportunities • Participate in Ground Emergency Medical Transport (GEMT) Program Employee Infrastructure • Provide training to maintain certifications in EMS and fire prevention • Encourage and support firefighters to pursue college educations • Enable career and volunteer personnel to attain 100% of mandated training Focus Area: Strengthening Community Safety and Welfare Public Safety/Emergency Services • Respond to calls for service in a timely manner with highly trained and compassionate personnel • Provide responders with equipment and training to allow them to perform their mission effectively and safely • Disaster preparedness, planning and training is provided to City government • Participate in state and regional emergency management planning to allow for effective coordinated response to catastrophic events • Maintain City Emergency Operations Center PAGE 6 ANNUAL REPORT YEAR 2018 Economic Development • Continue to work with Planning and Economic Development to ensure that innovative, collaborative approaches are considered when dealing with proposed projects Partnerships • Public, private and inter -governmental partnerships are actively pursued in order to maximize the availability of public safety resources • Continue to explore cooperative service opportunities with the adjoining fire districts where operational, financial or organizational efficiencies can be achieved • Build and maintain partnerships with the business community and public agencies to assist with the Fire Department mission Sustainability • Continue to explore methods aimed at reducing unnecessary emergency responses - both medical and fire • Provide programs aimed at reducing the impact upon persons affected by emergency incidents • Expand possibilities for increased community interaction through venues such as the County fair and community safety day PAGE 7 ANNUAL REPORT YEAR 2018 The development and participation in regular training and exercises designed to test roles, responsibilities , capabilities and protocols is an essential component of the pre -planning process and provides opportunities for the development of an integrated response to natural and man-made emergency incidents. in June of this year the Port Angeles Fire Department participated in a National Guard exercise held at Fairchild Airport. Life Flight now has an office and operating services here in Port Angeles. The Port Angeles Fire Department is called on to assist them if needed in order to provide the best care to the citizens of our county. Their presence here on the peninsula has been a great addition to the EMS community. PAGE 8 ANNUAL REPORT YEAR 2018 Performance Measures Performance measures are used to gauge the Fire Department's program efficiency and effectiveness relative to a meaningful standard or baseline. These measures allow us to compare the department with other cities and other fire departments. In order to do this we group the measures into four categories: 1. GENERAL 2. SPENDING AND INFORMATION STAFFING (INPUTS) • Total number of calls for service • Staffing for all • Calls per day and programs calls per time of day • Spending for all • Activities by type Programs • Sources of funding • Fund allocation 3. WORK LOAD 4. RESULTS (OUTPUTS) (OUTCOME) • Average daily • Fires per 1,000 responses population • Average weekly • Fire casualties callback responses • Response times PAGE 9 ANNUAL REPORT YEAR 2018 Performance Measures Spending and Staffing - Staffing For All Programs 2 1.8 1.6 1.4 1.2 e O's 0.6 0.4 0.2 ED CAREER FIREFIGHTERS PER 1,000 POPULATION 2013 2014 2015 2016 2 017 2018 ■ F~A F'D ■ Cern parab les In 2018, In addition to a Fire Chief, Assistant Chief/Fire Marshal, Assistant Chief/Operations, and Administrative Assistant the Port Angeles Fire Department had 22 career firefighters. Assuming a population of 19,872, with 26 career personnel, the ratio is 1.34 per 1,000 population. Career firefighters per 1,000 Population utilizing comparable cities of Aberdeen, Mt. Vernon, Mukilteo and Tumwater. The average number of career firefighters per 1,000 population was 1.73 in 2016 and 1.74 in 2017. That average increased to 1.81 in 2018. *Populations reflects census.gov PAGE 10 ANNUAL REPORT YEAR 2018 Performance Indicators General Information: Calls For Service COST PER CAPITA ■PAFD ■Comparables 2018, the cost per capita for fire protection and emergency medical services in Port Angeles was $218.20. This is based upon a total Departmental budget of $4,336,045.00 and a population of 19,872. The cities used as comparable were: Aberdeen, Mt. Vernon, Mukilteo and Tumwater. In 2018, the average cost per capita for these cities to provide fire protection and emergency medical services was $223.64 PAGE 11 0 0 M C M � 01 N ry C cl M r M lf1 V? N rn N M N N '. M N ry N N b ry 2012 2013 2014 7015 2016 2017 2018 2018, the cost per capita for fire protection and emergency medical services in Port Angeles was $218.20. This is based upon a total Departmental budget of $4,336,045.00 and a population of 19,872. The cities used as comparable were: Aberdeen, Mt. Vernon, Mukilteo and Tumwater. In 2018, the average cost per capita for these cities to provide fire protection and emergency medical services was $223.64 PAGE 11 ANNUAL REPORT Performance Indicators General Information: Calls For Service 5,500 �-- 5,000 4,500 �— -- 4,000 3,635 3,500 3,000 TOTAL NUMBER OF CALLS FOR SERVICE _ .._ 3,552 YEAR 2018 5,076 4,944 4,79D — 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 5YO76calis in 2018 represents an average of 13.9 calls for service each day. 2018 was the single busiest year for call volume in the history of the Port Angeles Fire Departmetn. This equates to a 2.7% increase in number of calls over the previous year. ■Calls PAGE 12 ANNUAL REPORT YEAR 2018 Performance Indicators General Information: Calls Per Day and Per Time of Day e M., -- I I 5pp Sunday Monday CALLS PER DAY OF THE WEEK 350 300 250 200 150 100 s0 Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday INCIDENTS RESPONDED TO BY HOUR OF THE DAY ■ Cabs --*—# of incidents PAGE 13 ANNUAL REPORT YEAR 2018 Performance Indicators General Information: Activities by Type MAJOR INCIDENT TYPE # OF INCIDENTS % OF TOTAL Rescue & Emergency Medical Service Incident 3,952 77.86% Service Call 472 9.30% Good Intent Call 330 6.50% False Alarm & False Call 203 4.00% Fire 58 1.14% Hazardous Condition (No Fire) 48 .95% Special Incident Type 13 .26% % OF TOTAL ■ Rescue & Emergency Medical Service incident Service Call ■ Good intent Call ■ False Alarm & False Call Fires ■ Hazardous Condition (No Fire) ■ Special incident Type PAGE 14 ANNUAL REPORT YEAR 2018 Performance Indicators General Information: Funding Allocation HOW THE FUNDS ARE ALLOCATED ■ Emergent; Res�n,e 69'4 Managernen: and Tran ng 7.4 ■ Fre Pre;err, Fon 0-544 ■ VC; un?ec 5uDaort ;-5% Facurtes Maintenance 0-5% General Information - Sources of Funding The total budget for the Fire Department in 2018 was $4,336,045.00. The Fire Department contributed 63.58% of its own budget or $2,756,700.00. The City's General Fund contribution to the Fire Department, less revenue generated, was $1,740,600.00. Funds are allocated to one of five major functional areas: • Emergency Feadiness • Fire Suppression • Emergency Medical Services • Technical Rescue • Includes Emergency Management PAGE 15 9T 3!)Vd saagwnu STOZ pUe LTOZ aul ui paTaaIjaa se apew }uawliedaa ayj }eql sjaeqjjea jo Aagwnu ayj paseaaaap Alleailseap pue ssauani4aa}3a asuodsa.i paseaaaui ppow asuodsaa s,juauajaedaa ayj ui aSuep sigi -19pow 2uij}els wnwiuiw uosaad S e paldope juawliedaQ 3AIJ ayl `9TOZ ul 's}uap!DUI pa}aea}oid ao aa2ael Alleaaua2 aae asagj `sjuappui aai3 ao3 •delaano aainaas aol silex uaq m papaau Alleaaua2 aae s�aeqjjeu `sluapiaui SW3 ao3 -jauuosaad aaaaea Ajnp-jjo Ao aaa}un]on aainbaa jeyj sluapiaui asogl aae ,slaeqlleD,, -pad ui aae sasuodsad aai3 `an1q ui aae sasuodsad SW3 8TOZ LTOZ 9TOZ STOZ bTOZ £TOZ 0 3ald SW3 3211d'8 SW3 3SNOdS3?J Al)133M 8TOZ STOZ OTOZ SON OOOZ S66T 0 S 3N13 SW3 3HIJ18 SW3 3SNOdS3H Alldd 39V83AV Z b 9 8 OT ST PUoiK-10A& siolumpul aauu. ujoljad STOZ dV3A idOdRf ivnNNV ANNUAL REPORT YEAR 2018 Performance Indicators Results FIRES PER 12000 4 F 0 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 There were 2.91 fires per 1,000 population in 2018. PACE 1 ANNUAL REPORT YEAR 2018 Performance Indicators Results: Response Times For 2018, the average overall response time for calls, for initial dispatch to arrival was 5.69 minutes. Time Standard Met? Actual Turnout Time First Arriving Apparatus at Fire Full First Alarm Fire Response (14-15 people) EMS Response Hazardous Materials (Operations) Technical Rescue (Operations) Marine Response Wildland Fire - First Engine 2 min 90% Yes 1:16 min 8 min 90% No 8:27 min 18 min 90% N/A N/A 8 min 90% Yes 6:27 min 8 min 90% No 9:17 min 8 min 90% No 2:24 min 28 min 90% N/A N/A 8 min 90% Yes 7:12 min Firefighters respond to a wide variety of situations, including medical emergencies, fires, traumatic injuries, rescues and hazardous materials incidents. The incidents are never scheduled, and the response required is often urgent. The common factor in all of these incidents is the requirement for the rapid response of trained personnel with adequate resources and equipment. Measuring this response time is a key to judging the performance of the Department. Positive outcomes are maximized when response times are reduced. Legislation requires that career fire departments establish response time standards and report those outcomes annually. The table above illustrates the response time standards that were adopted by the Port Angeles City Council in 2008, and whether those standards were met in 2018. ANATOMY OF A 9-1-1 CALL CALL DISPATCH TURNOUT TRAVEL Citizen Calls 9-1-1 9-1-1 center processes From when units are From when the unit starts call and dispatches dispatched to when crews moving to arrival on - units are dressed in appropriate scene. protective gear and in the apparatus ready to go PAGE 18 ANNUAL REPORT YEAR 2018 Division Reports Training The Department is mandated to provide training, education and ongoing development for all personnel commensurate with their duties and functions that they are expected to perform. Both career and volunteer personnel receive training that includes emergency vehicle operations, firefighting, hazardous materials and emergency medical. Initial and on-going training is essential for the safe and effective provision of emergency services. Tasked with protecting emergency responders as they perform their duties, the general public, and the preservation of property and the environment; the demand and complexity of training has grown in response to an ever increasing expectation and responsibility to respond to natural and man-made incidents. To meet this need it is essential that personnel receive training that is current, relevant, reliable and available at the appropriate level for the various skill levels of our personnel. Volunteer Recruit Training Port Angeles relies upon a combination of career and volunteer personnel for the delivery of emergency services. Entry level volunteer members must successfully complete: 175 hours of Emergency Medical Technician training • 250 hours of basic firefighting skills training These training activities are provided in conjunction with our partner fire and EMS agencies through mutual assistance agreements. In addition to basic State recognized certifications, volunteer personnel also receive college credit for completing the Emergency Medical Technician program. PAGE 19 ANNUAL REPORT YEAR 2018 Division Reports Training Fire Training On-going fire training is provided through a combination of classroom and practical application, specific skills evaluations and web -based training courses. This combination approach provides approximately 90 hours of hands-on skills training annually. Web based training provides members the ability to complete course materials online, at their convenience 24/7. Historically, in -classroom instruction required multiple classroom sessions specific to a single topic to accommodate the multi shift and volunteer structure our members operate within. The Port Angeles Fire Department trains in many areas such as: • Incident management • Firefighter safety • Building construction • Forcible entry • Fire suppression • Hazardous materials • Emergency vehicle operations • Emergency medical • Vehicle extrication • Special operations • Confined space • Water rescue • Rope PAGED ANNUAL REPORT YEAR 2018 Division Reports Fire Prevention: Inspection Fire inspections are an integral part of an overall fire prevention program. Fire inspections are conducted by on duty fire suppression personnel and the Fire Marshal's office. When fire fighters visit a local business to conduct a fire inspection they accomplish several objectives: • The firefighters are meeting directly with the citizens who they serve. They provide a direct connection between the community and the Department, during a non -emergency event. These connections help foster a spirit of teamwork. • The firefighters are identifying items that could potentially start a fire, contribute to the spread of a fire or endanger occupants. The prevention of fires not only protects people, it keeps businesses in business. The fire Department recognizes that as part of the community, we are essentially "all in this together". We recognize that it is in our collective best interest to prevent fires and keep businesses operating safely. • The firefighters are familiarizing themselves with the structures in the community, taking note of the type of construction, the ingress and egress points, the locations of utilities and the contents inside. All of these pieces of information can come into play when a fire officer is developing a strategy for mitigating an incident in a building. •Assembly -certificate, of Occupancy •C.cr)plamt & ccurr y • Daycare -Fire Alarm Acceptance, Annual Test & Halon Sy;tem Tact -Hood & Duct Semi Annual v Acceptance • -Plan Reviews (auildine, =ire Alarm, =ire Sprinkler, Hoed and Duct; •Re`errls • -Gccupancy inspec7icn, •Spnnkiet nspect+cnr i -vdre =unai =1e:4 01„cernen; ArnuA Te_:f -Tier 2 Reporun -UST Abandcnment -Permit Apphc_tion Reviews • TOTAL INSPECTIONS PAGE 21 ANNUAL REPORT YEAR 2018 Division Reports Fire Prevention: Plan Review As a part of the overall prevention effort, the Fire Department conducts reviews of plans that are submitted for construction of various structures and systems. The plan review process ensures that the proposed project meets the requirements of the current edition of the International Building and Fire Codes, as well as applicable provisions within the City Municipal Code. The Department routinely reviews plans for structures, fire sprinkler systems, fire alarm systems and restaurant hood and duct suppression systems. In addition, the Department will assist the Planning Department by conducting reviews of proposed variances, subdivisions, parcel changes, street vacations and special event plans Community Outreach The Department enjoys interacting with the community and keeps its doors open for community events and opportunities to engage with the public. In 2018 the Port Angeles Fire Department taught 4 Fire Extinguisher Classes, monthly First Aid and CPR courses and gave many educational Station Tours. The Department was also able to participate in the Port Angeles High School Career Day as well as the Peninsula College Safety Fair. In July of 2018 we hosted the North Olympic Library System for their Summer Reading program for the second year in a row, we had such a great time reading and interacting with all of the children and their parents. We look forward to hosting NOLS again in 2019. PAGE 22 ANNUAL REPORT YEAR 2018 Division Reports Fire Prevention: Public Education Public Education is a critical element in any successful fire prevention program. Surely "an ounce of prevention is always better than a pound of cure" and this is especially true when it comes to the cost effectiveness of fire prevention efforts. Public education about the causes and effects of fire is important for both young persons and adults, and it is a message that needs to be spread whenever possible. Firefighters are essentially doing fire prevention education every time they point out issues during fire inspections. The fire prevention message is also provided during tours of the fire station and at various community events throughout the year. Perhaps the single largest public education event we sponsor every year is Sparky Week. In 2018, we sponsored the 66th Annual Sparky Week, an event where we travel to every elementary school in the City and collect all of the second -graders to bring them to the fire station for a fun and informative fire safety presentation. This year we had 332 second -graders plus teachers and parents visit the Station. PAGE 23 ANNUAL REPORT YEAR 2018 Division Reports Fire Prevention: Fire Investigations The Fire Department investigates all significant fires in order to determine where the fire originated, and when possible, what caused it. Fire investigations can be very labor intensive and, considering most investigations are taking place inside burned structures; they can be hazardous as well. It is important to investigate significant fires so that we can determine whether or not a crime may have occurred, but perhaps more importantly, once we know what caused a fire, we want to be able to take steps to prevent it from happening again. In 2018 the Port Angeles Fire Department responded to 58 fire incidents and conducted 8 extensive origin and cause investigations. All of the 8 investigated fires occurred in residential occupancies. With exception to one incident involving a fatality, each of these fires were limited to property damage only. In large part due to the presence of heating, cooking, and smoking, a majority of structure fires occur in residential occupancies. Unfortunately, residential occupancies also account for the greatest occurrence of fire fatalities. Through continued fire code enforcement, including smoke detectors, residential fire sprinkler systems, and public education we continue to work toward making our community and residents safer. PAGE 24 SZ 30Vd uoi}eanp3-aiignd/�ao•ed}u•nnmm//:sdITg :aIisgann 2uinnollo} ay} le puno} aq uea uoileuaaojui Atales pue uoiJuanaad axil jo A aiaen y •pazisegduaa aano aq jouuea sw@IsAs aallulads leiluapisaa se Bans saanjeaj Ajales pappe pue `ueld adeasa A:)ua2aauaa ue `saopajap a�ouas 2ui�aonn 2uineg jo aauejaodwi agl 'SUIUana 1egj sjuaw4mde Aiag} of uanjaa ol pannolle aaann sivapisaa lie `aail agj Sulnnollol, aaeld ui ind sainseaw aaueuajuieuA pue anQaajoad awos gjiM •nnolaq A IID@Aip auo ay} pue }uawliede leuiSuo ay} of pauie}uoa AlaniTelaa seen a2ewep A@Ienn pue aall, pue juaplaui sigj o} anp paaeldsip a.iann sivapisaa agl jo auou `WaISAS aalIuiads agl jo asuodsaa �ainb pue uoi}enijae a14ewolne agj o} ana •juapiaui siyj uo saapuodsaa ADua2.lawa Aou s}uapisaa of saianfui ou aaann aaagl `Ailnj� uegl *spaezeg Ouiuiewaa Aue aje2p!w pue aniaae o} lauuosiad 2uipuodsaa pue adeasa of sjuednaao Molle o} aaij agj pauieluoa pue pajenljae Alpinb walsAs aaijuiAs agj `uoilaaIoad Ajal.es alit pue asuodsaa isel aoj pau2isaa -wa}sAs aal�uiads axil leijuapisaa aiTewolne ue glint\ 11inq pue pau2isap seen xaldwoa juawliede sig} `Alajeunjao3 -Aial.es ajil luednaao of Asia pue anasaa aol lequalod snoiaas agj paziuSoaaa Alaleip@wwi snnaaa asuodsaa GJVd `suoijejluail Al!ligow gjinn sluapisaa awos of awoq si 1eg} xaldwoa juawlAede Al!wel -i}lnw e si ainlanals sigj sy -uagali71 agj jo slauigea Aaddn agj o4 peaads Alpidea pue pallu2i q:)Igm aauanq agj oluo palilds ued dol anoIs e ui llo jog `}uapiaui Bans auo up u@gDi! l agj ui 2uileui2iao saiij lepuapisaa leaanas of papuodsaa snnaaa Aaua2aauaa `gTOZ ui suoTjLI2T SaAUj aai3 :UOIIUaAa.ld a-IIJ slaodag uoisinrQ0 8TOZ ?JV3A idod3a IVnNNV ANNUAL REPORT Division Reports YEAR 2018 Support Officers The Port Angeles Fire Department is extremely fortunate to have a Support Officer Program. Support Officers are individuals who volunteer their time to the community in order to provide much needed support to citizens who are experiencing significantly difficult times in their lives. Working as Fire Department volunteers, Support Officers provide assistance to friends and family members who are in the midst of tragic circumstances. Drawing upon their backgrounds in crisis management and counseling, Support Officers tend to folks who might otherwise be overlooked in the confusion of a chaotic event. Imagine the helpless feeling that a spouse must have as they watch emergency personnel work to care for a long-time companion who may be seriously ill or injured. There are countless questions, never -imagined issues and often horrible uncertainties. Support Officers provide a caring, compassionate position from which they can assist. During 2018, Support Officers were called to 5 scenes. The Port Angeles Fire Department initiated 4 of those requests, Clallam County Fire District 2 utilized our Support Officer services once during the year. The Support Officers give freely of their time - They are volunteers in the truest sense of the word - and their services are incredibly appreciated. Jerry Dean Tim Hughes Patrick Lovejoy Gail Wheatle �x PAGE 26 ANNUAL REPORT YEAR 2018 Personnel Highlights In 2018 the Department said good bye to two retiring firefighters. Paramedic Rob Gunn served 22 years with the Port Angeles Fire Department , while Lieutenant Kevin Denton served 19 years. PAFD thanks them for their dedication to our community, they will be missed. The Department was busy hiring in 2018. Chief Dubuc has always stressed the importance of taking the time to find the right people rather than rushing to fill a position. Nearly half of the entire Department has been here a year or less, there is definitely a new energy in the station and we are proud of the new hires that have been made. We hired three new Firefighters in 2018. Harry Hause joined us as an EMT from North Kitsap Fire and Rescue where he spent the last 2 years. He was born and raised in the Seattle area. In his free time Harry enjoys fishing, hiking, and playing with the family dog. PAGE 27 ANNUAL REPORT YEAR 2018 Personnel Highlights George Kourdahi come to us as an EMT from North Kitsap Fire and Rescue. George was raised in Edmonds, he is American -Lebanese and speaks Lebanese fluently. George is currently completing , his AA in Fire Science at Everett Community College. In his free time he enjoys playing basketball, reading, traveling and spending time with his family Tyler Wildeman is not only new to the Department but also new to Washington State, in October he made the long drive here from Denver, CO to accept the position. Tyler served in the Marines for 7.5 years, he loves snowboarding, hiking, hunting and spending time outdoors with his dog. PAGE 28 ANNUAL REPORT YEAR 2018 Department Highlights In December of this year a severe windstorm struck the Peninsula and had a huge impact on the Department. The Emergency Operations Center was initiated and staffed. There was some significant damage in our area, with the help of Clallam County Emergency Management and the State we were able to work together to ensure the safety and well- being of our community. The Port Angeles Fire Department Auxiliary hosted the Annual Pancake Breakfast with proceeds to benefit PAFD Auxiliary scholarships, fire relief baskets and community outreach. Operation Candy Cane was such a success this year, these events wouldn't be possible without our Volunteer and Career personnel who donate their evenings to run through the streets of Port Angeles collecting food and money donations to help the local food banks. I his is such a fun community event and people truly look forward to attending each year. v r fl f Rs OPERATION q CANDY L CANE A mss. -401s '�'A % .�. PAGE 29